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can someone help me come up with 5 class discussion questions please? (read the description)

can someone help me come up with 5 class discussion questions?
The book we are reading in class is the little prince, and we have a class discussion coming up. the themes that I picked are imagination, royalty and leadership.

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Hi Michael,
The following is a write-up of a tour of The Maine Historical Society and maybe this can give some clues on getting questions for themes such as imagination, royalty and leadership.

Before touring the birthplace of American poet Henry Longfellow, a visitor can see an exhibition showing the development of Acadia National Park located on Mt. Desert Island. The Wabanakis were the original natives of the island which was explored and named by French explorer Samuel Champlain. Because the summits of the island were bare, as recorded by Champlain, the island's name was derived from such scenery. Acadia National Park was a tourist spot for the middle and upper classes who were known as "rusticators." Maine politicians such as James Blaine and President Benjamin Harrison visited there in 1889. Women wore cotton dresses and/or dusters which are on display near the exhibit's front entrance. People would rain a small train to Green Mountain what is now called Cadillac Mountain. Roads for cars were idealized by John D. Rockefeller but the actualization of the roads was done by landscape architect Frederick Olmsted. A Ford 1927 Model T was a car driven on the roads which is on display too. Rockefeller did construct carriage roads though. There's a design for a direction sign on a wall used then...In an adjacent room, lies artifacts and pictures taken from the custom house of the great fire of 1866. The badly burned buildings show the devastation and direction of the conflagration such as at Congress and Franklin sts. One of the artifacts, is a stereoview used to create 3-D optical illusions and a tall clock dating back to about 1810 that was owned by a settler in Yarmouth.

The tour guide for the Henry Longfellow House tour let visitors know when picture- taking was permitted and started the tour by saying that Longfellow's grandparents built the house during the 1700's and they lived there before Henry's parents moved in and that the original house was only 2 stories tall and that the third floor was added later. The bricks used for the first 2 floors came from Philadelphia whereas the bricks used for the third floor came from Maine. The back view from the house allowed them to see as far as the White Mountains of New Hampshire, a side view as far as the Portland Observatory and the front view as far as the bay. The original name of Congress street was Back street because it was literally the back street of Portland at that time. Subsequently, after Back street came Middle st then Fore st which is near the bay. Ann, Henry's sister, was the last Longfellow to live in the that house until her death in 1901. Even though in-door plumbing was started in the 1860's, she only had a spigot for cold water installed a few years before her death and she continued to use the outhouse in the backyard. As a young woman, she got married to George Pierce and lived with him. During her marriage, she became a widow in about 3 years because a typhoid fever epidemic killed George and she eventually returned to her parent's house. She had no children. On the first floor of the tour, there's a fireplace, stove, pots, table and a niche in the kitchen's wall for preparing bath water. There's an open metal container about knee high there with evenly spaced shelves near the fireplace which allowed for meals to be kept warm. As a child, Henry and his siblings would usually play in the kitchen during the winter because it the warmest room in the house. A rocking horse, paddles and a board with pegs were toys they played with. They played instruments too such as Henry's flute and Mary on the piano in a room with an engraving of George Washington hanging on the wall since 1805. The portraits of Henry, Ann and Stephen are flawless. Zilpah's, Henry's mother, father had served under Washington during the war. She slept in a bedroom with canopy on top arranged in its original 19th century setting. The wallpaper in her bedroom has a pattern of trellis because they gardened and farmed. Zilpah had 8 children. His father, Stephen, was a lawyer and his law books and those of his family are on exhibit too. Henry wrote his first poem at age 13. He graduated from Bowdoin College and later taught modern languages there. After graduating, his father arranged for his voyage to Europe. In order to board the ship to Europe, he was allowed to bring only 2 pieces of luggage. One of them was his portable desk. Both pieces are in an upper floor room next to each other. There's a map hanging on the wall up there. The docent passed around a duplicate of that map on the wall for visitors to see. The map on the wall is scheduled to be treated to bring back its original appearance. The wooden escritoire on which Henry wrote The Rainy Day seemingly transports a visitor back to his time period. Tens of thousands of his poems sold in England as well and thus he lived a lucrative life. When Henry died, Queen Victoria of England formed a committee and had a bust of him put in Westminster Abbey even though she made it clear that she didn't want to be outwardly associated with him. Henry Longfellow died in 1882 at the age of 75. He had 6 children. In his poem "The Children's Hour", the eldest surviving daughter, Alice Mary Longfellow, is mentioned as "grave Alice." The tour lasted approximately 40 minutes.
Hi Michael,
I wrote earlier and one or two of the sentences pertaining to Mt. Desert Island could be written better. Best of luck on the paper!
 


Before touring the birthplace of American poet Henry Longfellow, a visitor can see an exhibition showing the development of Acadia National Park located on Mt. Desert Island. The Wabanakis were the original natives of the island which was explored and named by French explorer Samuel Champlain. Because the summits of the island were bare, as recorded by Champlain, the island's name was derived from such scenery. Acadia National Park was a tourist spot for the middle and upper classes who were known as "Rusticators." Maine politicians such as James Blaine and President Benjamin Harrison visited there in 1889. Women wore cotton dresses and/or dusters which are on display near the exhibit's front entrance. Visitors rode a small train to Green Mountain what is now called Cadillac Mountain. Roads for cars were idealized by John D. Rockefeller but the actualization of the roads was done by landscape architect Frederick Olmsted. A Ford 1927 Model T was a car driven on the roads which is on display too. Rockefeller did construct carriage roads though. There's a design for a direction sign on a wall used then...In an adjacent room, lies artifacts and pictures taken from the custom house of the great fire of 1866. The badly burned buildings show the devastation and direction of the conflagration such as at Congress and Franklin sts. One of the artifacts, is a stereoview used to create 3-D optical illusions and a tall clock dating back to about 1810 that was owned by a settler in Yarmouth.

The tour guide for the Henry Longfellow House tour let visitors know when picture- taking was permitted and started the tour by saying that Longfellow's grandparents built the house during the 1700's and they lived there before Henry's parents moved in and that the original house was only 2 stories tall and that the third floor was added later. The bricks used for the first 2 floors came from Philadelphia whereas the bricks used for the third floor came from Maine. The back view from the house allowed them to see as far as the White Mountains of New Hampshire, a side view as far as the Portland Observatory and the front view as far as the bay. The original name of Congress street was Back street because it was literally the back street of Portland at that time. Subsequently, after Back street came Middle st then Fore st which is near the bay. Ann, Henry's sister, was the last Longfellow to live in the that house until her death in 1901. Even though in-door plumbing was started in the 1860's, she only had a spigot for cold water installed a few years before her death and she continued to use the outhouse in the backyard. As a young woman, she got married to George Pierce and lived with him. During her marriage, she became a widow in about 3 years because a typhoid fever epidemic killed George and she eventually returned to her parent's house. She had no children. On the first floor of the tour, there's a fireplace, stove, pots, table and a niche in the kitchen's wall for preparing bath water. There's an open metal container about knee high there with evenly spaced shelves near the fireplace which allowed for meals to be kept warm. As a child, Henry and his siblings would usually play in the kitchen during the winter because it the warmest room in the house. A rocking horse, paddles and a board with pegs were toys they played with. They played instruments too such as Henry's flute and Mary on the piano in a room with an engraving of George Washington hanging on the wall since 1805. The portraits of Henry, Ann and Stephen are flawless. Zilpah's, Henry's mother, father had served under Washington during the war. She slept in a bedroom with canopy on top arranged in its original 19th century setting. The wallpaper in her bedroom has a pattern of trellis because they gardened and farmed. Zilpah had 8 children. His father, Stephen, was a lawyer and his law books and those of his family are on exhibit too. Henry wrote his first poem at age 13. He graduated from Bowdoin College and later taught modern languages there and at Harvard. After graduation, his father arranged for his voyage to Europe. In order to board the ship to Europe, he was allowed to bring only 2 pieces of luggage. One of them was his portable desk. Both pieces are in an upper floor room next to each other. There's a map hanging on the wall up there. The docent passed around a duplicate of that map on the wall for visitors to see. The map on the wall is scheduled to be treated to bring back its original appearance. The wooden escritoire on which Henry wrote The Rainy Day seemingly transports a visitor back to his time period. Tens of thousands of his poems sold in England as well and thus he lived a lucrative life. When Henry died, Queen Victoria of England formed a committee and had a bust of him put in Westminster Abbey even though she made it clear that she didn't want to be outwardly associated with him. Henry Longfellow died in 1882 at the age of 75. It's written that he had 6 children. But, I think the tour guide may have said he had 5 children. In his poem "The Children's Hour", the eldest surviving daughter, Alice Mary Longfellow, is mentioned as "grave Alice." The fantastic, quaint historical tour of the house lasted approximately 40 minutes.
Before touring the birthplace of American poet Henry Longfellow, a visitor can see an exhibition showing the development of Acadia National Park located on Mt. Desert Island. The Wabanakis were the original natives of the island which was explored and named by French explorer Samuel Champlain. Because the summits of the island were bare, as recorded by Champlain, the island's name was derived from such scenery. Acadia National Park was a tourist spot for the middle and upper classes who were known as "rusticators." Maine politicians such as James Blaine and President Benjamin Harrison visited there in 1889. That's the same year North Dakota was made a state. Women wore cotton dresses and/or dusters which are on display near the exhibit's front entrance. People rode a small train to Green Mountain to what is now called Cadillac Mountain. Roads for cars were idealized by John D. Rockefeller but the actualization of the roads was done by landscape architect Frederick Olmsted. A Ford 1927 Model T was a car driven on the roads which is on display too. Rockefeller did construct carriage roads though. There's a design for a direction sign used then on a wall...In an adjacent room, lies artifacts and pictures taken from the custom house during the great fire of 1866. The badly burned buildings show the devastation and direction of the conflagration such as at Congress and Franklin sts. One of the artifacts, is a stereoview used to create 3-D optical illusions and a tall clock dating back to about 1810 that was owned by a settler in Yarmouth.

The tour guide for the Henry Longfellow House tour lets visitors know when picture taking is permitted and started the tour by saying that Longfellow's grandparents built the house during the 1700's and they lived there before Henry's parents moved in and that the original house was only 2 stories tall and that the third floor was added later. The bricks used for the first 2 floors came from Philadelphia whereas the bricks used for the third floor came from Maine. The back view from the house allowed them to see as far as the White Mountains of New Hampshire, a side view as far as the Portland Observatory and the front view as far as the bay. The original name of Congress street was Back street because it was literally the back street of Portland at that time. Subsequently, after Back street came Middle st then Fore st which is near the bay. Ann, Henry's sister, was the last Longfellow to live in the that house until her death in 1901. Even though in-door plumbing was started in the 1860's, she only had a spigot for cold water installed a few years before her death and she continued to use the outhouse in the backyard. As a young woman, she got married to George Pierce and lived with him. During her marriage, she became a widow in about 3 years because a typhoid fever epidemic killed George and she eventually returned to her parent's house. She had no children. On the first floor of the tour, there's a fireplace, stove, pots, table and a niche in the kitchen's wall for preparing bath water. There's an open metal container about knee high there with evenly spaced shelves near the fireplace which allowed for meals to be kept warm. As a child, Henry and his siblings would usually play in the kitchen during the winter because it the warmest room in the house. A rocking horse, paddles and a board with pegs were toys they played with. They played instruments too such as Henry's flute and Mary on the piano in a room with an engraving of George Washington hanging on the wall since 1805. The portraits of Henry, Ann and Stephen are flawless. Zilpah's, Henry's mother, father had served under Washington during the war. She slept in a bedroom with canopy on top arranged in its original 19th century setting. The wallpaper in her bedroom has a pattern of trellis because they gardened and farmed. Zilpah had 8 children. His father, Stephen, was a lawyer and his law books and those of his family are on exhibit too. Henry wrote his first poem at age 13. He graduated from Bowdoin College and later taught modern languages there. After graduating, his father arranged for his voyage to Europe. In order to board the ship to Europe, he was allowed to bring only 2 pieces of luggage. One of them was his portable desk. Both pieces are in an upper floor room next to each other. There's a map hanging on the wall up there. The docent passed around a duplicate of that map on the wall for visitors to see. The map on the wall is scheduled to be treated to bring back its original appearance. The wooden escritoire on which Henry wrote The Rainy Day seemingly transports a visitor back to his time period. Tens of thousands of his poems sold in England as well and thus he lived a lucrative life. When Henry died, Queen Victoria of England formed a committee and had a bust of him put in Westminster Abbey even though she made it clear that she didn't want to be outwardly associated with him. Henry Longfellow died in 1882 at the age of 75. The tour lasts approximately 40 minutes.
Before touring the birthplace of American poet Henry Longfellow, a visitor can see an exhibition showing the development of Acadia National Park located on Mt. Desert Island. The Wabanakis were the original natives of the island which was explored and named by French explorer Samuel Champlain. Because the summits of the island were bare, as recorded by Champlain, the island's name was derived from such scenery. Acadia National Park was a tourist spot for the middle and upper classes who were known as "Rusticators." Maine politicians such as James Blaine and President Benjamin Harrison visited there in 1889. That same year North Dakota was made a state. Women wore cotton dresses and/or dusters which are on display near the exhibit's front entrance. People rode a small train to Green Mountain to what is now called Cadillac Mountain. Roads for cars were idealized by John D. Rockefeller but the actualization of the roads was done by landscape architect Frederick Olmsted. A Ford 1927 Model T was a car driven on those roads which is on display too. Rockefeller did construct carriage roads though. There's a design for a direction sign used then on a wall...In an adjacent room, lies artifacts and pictures taken from the custom house during the great fire of 1866. The badly burned buildings show the devastation and direction of the conflagration such as at Congress and Franklin sts. One of the artifacts, is a stereoview used to create 3-D optical illusions and a tall clock dating back to about 1810 that was owned by a settler in Yarmouth.

The tour guide for the Henry Longfellow House tour lets visitors know when picture taking is permitted and started the tour by saying that Longfellow's grandparents built the house during the 1700's and they lived there before Henry's parents moved in and that the original house was only 2 stories tall and that the third floor was added later. The bricks used for the first 2 floors came from Philadelphia whereas the bricks used for the third floor came from Maine. The back view from the house allowed them to see as far as the White Mountains of New Hampshire, a side view as far as the Portland Observatory and the front view as far as the bay. The original name of Congress street was Back street because it was literally the back street of Portland at that time. Subsequently, after Back street came Middle st then Fore st which is near the bay. Ann, Henry's sister, was the last Longfellow to live in the that house until her death in 1901. Even though in-door plumbing was started in the 1860's, she only had a spigot for cold water installed a few years before her death and she continued to use the outhouse in the backyard. As a young woman, she got married to George Pierce and lived with him. During her marriage, she became a widow in about 3 years because a typhoid fever epidemic killed George and she eventually returned to her parent's house. She had no children. On the first floor of the tour, there's a fireplace, stove, pots, table and a niche in the kitchen's wall for preparing bath water. There's an open metal container about knee high there with evenly spaced shelves near the fireplace which allowed for meals to be kept warm. As a child, Henry and his siblings would usually play in the kitchen during the winter because it the warmest room in the house. A rocking horse, paddles and a board with pegs were toys they played with. They played instruments too such as Henry's flute and Mary on the piano in a room with an engraving of George Washington hanging on the wall since 1805. The portraits of Henry, Ann and Stephen are flawless. Zilpah's, Henry's mother, father had served under Washington during the war. She slept in a bedroom with canopy on top arranged in its original 19th century setting. The wallpaper in her bedroom has a pattern of trellis because they gardened and farmed. Zilpah had 8 children. His father, Stephen, was a lawyer and his law books and those of his family are on exhibit too. Henry wrote his first poem at age 13. He graduated from Bowdoin College and later taught modern languages there. After graduating, his father arranged for his voyage to Europe. In order to board the ship to Europe, he was allowed to bring only 2 pieces of luggage. One of them was his portable desk. Both pieces are in an upper floor room next to each other. There's a map hanging on the wall up there. The tour guide passed around a duplicate of that map on the wall for visitors to see. The map on the wall is scheduled to be treated to bring back its original appearance. The wooden escritoire on which Henry wrote The Rainy Day seemingly mentally transports a visitor back to his time period. Tens of thousands of his poems sold in England as well and thus he lived a lucrative life. When Henry died, Queen Victoria of England formed a committee and had a bust of him put in Westminster Abbey even though she made it clear that she didn't want to be publicly associated with him. Henry Longfellow died in 1882 at the age of 75. The tour lasts approximately 40 minutes.
Before touring the birthplace of American poet Henry Longfellow, a visitor can see an exhibition showing the development of Acadia National Park located on Mt. Desert Island. The Wabanakis were the original natives of the island which was explored and named by French explorer Samuel Champlain. Because the summits of the island were bare, as recorded by Champlain, the island's name was derived from such scenery. Acadia National Park was a tourist spot for the middle and upper classes who were known as "Rusticators." Maine politicians such as James Blaine and President Benjamin Harrison visited there in 1889. That same year North Dakota was made a state. Women wore cotton dresses and/or dusters which are on display near the exhibit's front entrance. People rode a small train to Green Mountain to what is now called Cadillac Mountain. Roads for cars were idealized by John D. Rockefeller but the actualization of the roads was done by landscape architect Frederick Olmsted. A Ford 1927 Model T was a car driven on those roads which is on display too. Rockefeller did construct carriage roads though. There's a design for a direction sign used then on a wall...In an adjacent room, lies artifacts and pictures taken from the custom house during the great fire of 1866. The badly burned buildings show the devastation and direction of the conflagration such as at Congress and Franklin sts. One of the artifacts, is a stereoview used to create 3-D optical illusions and a tall clock dating back to about 1810 that was owned by a settler in Yarmouth.

The tour guide for the Henry Longfellow House tour lets visitors know when picture taking is permitted and started the tour by saying that Longfellow's grandparents built the house during the 1700's and they lived there before Henry's parents moved in and that the original house was only 2 stories tall and that the third floor was added later. The bricks used for the first 2 floors came from Philadelphia whereas the bricks used for the third floor came from Maine. The back view from the house allowed them to see as far as the White Mountains of New Hampshire, a side view as far as the Portland Observatory and the front view as far as the bay. The original name of Congress street was Back street because it was literally the back street of Portland at that time. Subsequently, after Back street came Middle st then Fore st which is near the bay. Ann, Henry's sister, was the last Longfellow to live in the that house until her death in 1901. Even though in-door plumbing was started in the 1860's, she only had a spigot for cold water installed a few years before her death and she continued to use the outhouse in the backyard. As a young woman, she got married to George Pierce and lived with him. During her marriage, she became a widow in about 3 years because a typhoid fever epidemic killed George and she eventually returned to her parent's house. She had no children. On the first floor of the tour, there's a fireplace, stove, pots, table and a niche in the kitchen's wall for preparing bath water. There's an open metal container about knee high there with evenly spaced shelves near the fireplace which allowed for meals to be kept warm. As a child, Henry and his siblings would usually play in the kitchen during the winter because it the warmest room in the house. A rocking horse, paddles and a board with pegs were toys they played with. They played instruments too such as Henry's flute and Mary on the piano in a room with an engraving of George Washington hanging on the wall since 1805. The portraits of Henry, Ann and Stephen are flawless. Zilpah's, Henry's mother, father had served under Washington during the war. She slept in a bedroom with canopy on top arranged in its original 19th century setting. The wallpaper in her bedroom has a pattern of trellis because they gardened and farmed. Zilpah had 8 children. His father, Stephen, was a lawyer and his law books and those of his family are on exhibit too. Henry wrote his first poem at age 13. He graduated from Bowdoin College and later taught modern languages there and at Harvard. After graduating, his father arranged for his voyage to Europe. In order to board the ship to Europe, he was allowed to bring only 2 pieces of luggage. One of them was his portable desk. Both pieces are in an upper floor room next to each other. There's a map hanging on the wall up there. The tour guide passed around a duplicate of that map on the wall for visitors to see. The map on the wall is scheduled to be treated to bring back its original appearance. The wooden escritoire on which Henry wrote The Rainy Day seemingly mentally transports a visitor back to his time period. Tens of thousands of his poems sold in England as well and thus he lived a lucrative life. When Henry died, Queen Victoria of England formed a committee and had a bust of him put in Westminster Abbey even though she made it clear that she didn't want to be publicly associated with him. Henry Longfellow died in 1882 at the age of 75. The tour lasts approximately 40 minutes.

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