233 Answered Questions for the topic Italian

03/28/19

Pluralization of Latin words?

Is the pluralization of Latin words accepted or even correct, unlike the pluralization of those coming from other languages?For example, "_sono stato in due bars_" would sound odd in Italian, but... more

03/28/19

How can I translate these conditional sentences?

- If I weren't going on my business trip next week, I would have accepted that new assignment at work.(I'm wondering especially about how to translate "weren't going", because in English we're... more

03/28/19

What is the rule for adjective order?

Some adjectives seem to change meaning depending on the position (before of after the noun), e.g.> un bambino piccolo - *a young child*> un piccolo bambino - *a small child*Other simply don't... more

03/27/19

How can I say "How are you?" in Italian?

In English, it is usual to ask "How are you?" as a salutation. How can I say a similar thing in Italian?
Italian Translation

03/27/19

Come posso dire a una persona "take your time" in italiano?

Come posso dire a una persona "take your time" oppure "make yourself at home" in italiano?Grazie.
Italian Grammar Plural

03/27/19

Plural of compound names?

In Italian, like in many other languages, many words are obtained by putting two other words toghether (noun, adjectives, verbs). For example, "capostazione" (stationmaster) is the person who is... more
Italian Grammar

03/27/19

Why do Italians respond to 'grazie' with 'di niente'?

Why do Italians respond to 'grazie' with 'di niente'?
Italian Grammar

03/27/19

Grammatical analysis of the construction "Se l'è mangiato il cane"?

My/The dog ate it is a common joke response in English for what a student can give as an excuse when he didn't do his homework. I found the following phrase while looking for the equivalent in... more

C'è with multiple conjoined nouns?

I came across this piece of lyrics from a song called "Laura non c'è", and could not decipher it:> Non vorrei che tu fossi un'emergenza > Ma tra bene ed amore c'è > Solo Laura e la mia... more
Italian Verbs

03/27/19

How and why did avere get the 'h' in some present tense forms?

Why do the *ho, hai, ha, hanno* forms of the present tense conjugation of *avere* begin with 'h'?In researching the issue, I have seen that many think that the 'h' is employed to differentiate from... more

Preposition "a" or "al"?

I know all the rules about how to form the articulated prepositions in Italian, so I don't have to understand how to construct them, but rather I have a doubt on when to use the simple and when to... more

Using a comma before 'ma'?

English uses a comma before _but_ if, and only if, it introduces an independent sentence. Is it the same in Italian?> - Essere sinceri è importante ma non troppo.> - Andrei in vacanza il... more

03/27/19

What is the difference between albergo and hotel?

Since I'm not a native Italian speaker, I don't exactly know what the difference between *hotel* and *albergo* is. Would you mind telling me the difference, please?

03/26/19

How do we say "right back at you"?

When someone is wishing us something, how do we say "right back at you"?Is "lo stesso vale per te" the right and only response?

Is there an idiomatic term for Shopaholic?

I write a diary entry in Italian each day to practice my vocabulary and sentence structure. Currently, my theme is 'Chi sono?' so I am looking for words that describe me. Today, I want to write... more

03/26/19

How do English words change when plural in Italian?

When an English word is used as a singular term in Italian, it is normal to use the English singular form, for example:* un film* un computer* un marine spaziale* un cowboyWhen the words are used... more
Italian Translation Sound

03/26/19

Onomatopoeia in Italian?

What's the Italian equivalent for words such as, "**crash**", "**bang**", "**snap**", "**woosh**", "**wallop**" etc? Are there any onomatopoeia references out there that consolidate these... more

03/26/19

When to use "andare a" vs "andare al, allo, alla, ai, agli, alle" vs "andare in"?

I'm trying to understand the rules but I don't seem to find a proper pattern.The main problem is my Spanish and French conflict with Italian...Io voglio andare a USA?Io voglio andare ai USA?Io... more

03/26/19

Elephant in the room. What is the Italian equivalent?

“Elephant in the room” or “Elephant in the living room” This idiom is used when we are referring to a big issue, an obvious truth, or an obvious problem that... more

03/26/19

Can native Italian speakers read The Divine Comedy?

I'm interested to know how hard it is for native Italian speakers to read The Divine Comedy in Dante's original language. The work was composed in the 14th century, so I imagine that there would be... more
Italian Grammar Resources

03/25/19

Textbooks for CELI exams?

Is there any good textbook for:- grammar revision for the CELI exam (from level A1 to C2)- writing part (for text writing) preparation with tips etc. (exams CELI 4 and CELI 5)- general preparation... more
Italian Grammar

03/25/19

When is it appropriate to move "sono" and other verbs to the end?

I've noticed in some Italian TV shows that, especially when the characters announce themselves, they don't say:**io sono [Title] [Name]**but rather**[Title] [Name] sono**I've seen this kind of... more

03/25/19

Using vicino or vicina?

Can someone explain if there is a difference in meaning or usage between vicino and vicina. As far as I can tell, they seem to be interchangeable, yet I've seen both used.
Italian Verbs

03/25/19

Dropping the last letter of a verb in some cases?

I have been listening to some Italian songs lately and I have noticed a fact that I don't know if it's a rule or it's done only in the spoken language of the song to improve the flow of the... more
Italian Grammar Verbs

03/25/19

Can "si passivante" be constructed with null subject in certain contexts?

Consider the following exchange in which si passivante appears:> A scuola, si leggono i libri?Surely a grammatical answer would be> Sì, si leggono i libri.If I wanted to not mention "i libri"... more

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