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CAN SOMEONE PLEASE CHECK MY ENGLISH ANSWERS PLEASE?

 
 
1.A literary device that compares two things using "like" or "as" is a (
  
metaphor
  
simile
  
paradox
  
hyperbole
   
Question 2
 
"I wandered lonely as a cloud/That floats on high o'er vales and hills" is an example of a: (10 points)
  
paradox
  
hyperbole
  
metaphor
  
simile
   
Question 3
 
"You are the smell of summers" is an example of (10 points)
  
paradox
  
hyperbole
  
metaphor
  
simile
  
Question 4
 
"An hundred years should go to prase/Thine eyes, and on thy forehead gaze" is an example of (10 points)
  
hyperbole
  
simile
  
paradox
  
metaphor
 
Question 5
 
"Parting is such sweet sorrow" is an example of (10 points)
  
simile
  
hyperbole
  
oxymoron
  
metaphor
 
MY ASWERS
QUESTION 1
1.METHAPHOR
 
QUESTION 2
2.SIMILE
 
QUESTION 3
3.HYPERBOLE
 
QUESTION 4
4.HYPERBOLEHYPERBOLE
 
QUESTION 5
5.OXYMORON
 
 
 
PLEASE CHECK MY ANSWERS I REALLY CAN NOT GET A BAD GRADE 
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3 Answers

Hello Daisy,
A good place to quiz yourself is quizlet.com. They have games, flashcards, and you can create your own vocabulary lists. here is a good set for your assignment: http://quizlet.com/35145971/literary-terms-flash-cards/ Also, once you learn a new term try using it in your own writing. To better learn vocabulary, I teach the following steps:
1. Look up the word
2. Rewrite the definition by hand using your own language that makes sense to you.
3. Use the word in a sentence that shows you understand it. If the word was metamorphisis, for example, you could write, “In Cinderella, the girl undergoes a metaphorphisis as she changes from a maid to a princess.” A sentence that would show that you understand the word would be, “Metamorphisis happens often.” By writing all of this down, you create physical connections in your brain that make it easier to remember.
4. Think of a story or an image that will help you to remember the word. Let’s use metamorphisis again. You could think of Cinderella or a caterpillar turning into a butterfly.
Now to your answers:

Hyperbole is when the author uses an extreme statement to make a point. “I am in love with this cake; it is the best thing ever created!” Is a bit of an overstatement and a hyperbole. “You are the worst person in all of history!” would also be a hyperbole.

Paradox is when a statement seems like it would not make sense, but the fact that it does not make sense it what makes it correct. (I know, this is a bit tricky.) Some examples of a paradox would be: bittersweet memories, idiot savant, criminal genius, I am nobody, and so on.

Similie or Metaphor: A good way to figure out if something is a simile or a metaphor is to see how the two things are being compared. If something is like something else, chances are it is a simile. If something IS something else, however, you are looking at a metaphor. For example, "he is as nervous as a cat in a room of rocking chairs," would be a simile. In this example, "He" is directly compared to a cat through the use of the word as. A metaphor is usually used throughout a novel or poem. "He was a shark in the boardroom," or, "The green light was hope itself." One thing is equated with the other rather than compared.
1. simile something is like something else
2. similie something is again like something else
3. metaphor something just is something
4. Hyperbole. This is really going overboard on the flattery
5. Oxymoron: the author sets two things next to each other that do not make immediate sense

Good luck.
Katherine
Hi Daisy,

Let's first define the terms:

A metaphor is a figure of speech that suggests a resemblance between two things by applying a term or phrase to something to which it is not literally applicable. As opposed to hyperbole, metaphors operate on appropriate analogy. E.g., "My love is a red red rose."

A simile is a figure of speech in which two unlike things are explicitly compared. Often, the comparative terms "like" and "as" are used. E.g. "She is like a rose."

Hyperbole is obvious and intentional exaggeration. It involves inappropriate analogy or magnitude. E.g., "I've been waiting in line for an eternity!"

A paradox is a statement or proposition that, on the surface, is self-contradictory or absurd but that in actuality expresses a possible truth. E.g., "A rich man is no richer than a poor man."

An oxymoron is a juxtaposition (placing two things right next to each other) or combination of apparently contradictory words. E.g., "living dead", "black light."

 
Now let's look at the quiz/test -- with the underlined answers below being your chosen answers and the portions of the text that are key to answering correctly in bold type.

Review the definitions above to help you choose the correct answers (when your answers are incorrect, of course).

Question 1:

1.A literary device that compares two things using "like" or "as" is a

metaphor

simile

paradox

hyperbole
 
... Your answer is not correct. (Look at the words in bold type above.)


Question 2:

"I wandered lonely as a cloud/That floats on high o'er vales and hills" is an example of a: (10 points)

paradox

hyperbole

metaphor

simile   
 
... Your answer is correct.


Question 3:

"You are the smell of summers" is an example of (10 points)

paradox

hyperbole

metaphor

simile      
 
... This could be an example of a both hyperbole and metaphor. However, hyperbole involves extremeness or comparisons of inappropriate magnitude. So it is a question of degree. Is “smell of summers” extreme? It’s hard to say. If you have to choose just one answer, I would choose metaphor over hyperbole, in which case your answer is (probably) incorrect. See, e.g., http://sesquiotic.wordpress.com/2011/02/02/can-a-metaphor-be-hyperbole-too/ ;


Question 4:

"An hundred years should go to prase/Thine eyes, and on thy forehead gaze" is an example of (10 points)

hyperbole

simile

paradox

metaphor
 
… Your answer is correct because “one hundred years” is extreme.


Question 5:

"Parting is such sweet sorrow" is an example of (10 points)

simile

hyperbole

oxymoron

metaphor      
 
… Your answer is correct. “Sweet” and “sorrow” are contradictory and they are placed right next to each other (are juxtaposed).
 
I hope this helps.
 
Chris
Hi, Daisy.
 
Your first two answers are reversed. A simile uses "like" or "as;" a metaphor is an implied comparison. Question 4 and 5 are correct. I am not sure about number 3; it could also be a metaphor.
 
 

Comments

Hi Kathye,
 
I agree with you about number 3 (please read my [lengthy] post.)
 
However, the term "as" in number 2 qualifies it as a simile, rather than a metaphor. "As" and "like" are comparative terms, both of which are used to convey similes. See, e.g., http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/simile ;
 
Chris
I now see, Kathye, that you did use the term "as" in your definition; apparently, you merely read the question too quickly. It happens to all of us :).