Wai L.

asked • 02/13/20

How do you use the words 'For Which' in an English sentence?

I am trying to learn about on which, at which, on which, etc"


But I'm stuck with "for which" mostly 


 A. The shaded region to the right of the break-even point represents quantities for which the company makes a profit. 


B. The shaded region to the right of the break-even point which represents quantities for the company makes a profit.


Is sentence B same as sentence A?


2nd example of for which:


A. the luncheon for which we bought the food will take place outside.


B. the luncheon which we bought the food for will take place outside. 


Is sentence B same as sentence A and are they both grammatically correct?


Thank you,






3 Answers By Expert Tutors

By:

Alexa T. answered • 02/13/20

Tutor
New to Wyzant

Trained & Experienced Writing Tutor

Wai L.

Just one more follow up question: we were taught not to end sentences in preposition. So is it possible to rearrange the first example B without have the sentence end in "for"?
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02/13/20

Alexa T.

Yes, that would be sentence A in the first example, where you use "for which" and end on the word "profit." Ending on a preposition isn't necessarily grammatically incorrect, but it may be less formal. In academic writing, you'd want to go with the more formal sentence A.
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02/14/20

Wai L.

excellent answer. Thank you!
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02/14/20

Katherine W.

tutor
Hello. Here is a bonus comment from me: The two examples given above about "the shaded region..." are both a bit awkward and wordy. The idea might be expressible like this, alternatively: The shaded region...represents quantities profitable to the company. Thank you
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02/20/20

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