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What is the difference between a simile and a metaphor?

Trying to finish a worksheet

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A metaphor can be used to replace one idea with another.  For example, a tsunami can be described as a "wave of destruction" for the damage that it causes.  It implies a comparison.  A simile establishes the comparison of ideas.  An endless torrent of rain flooded the valley like a tsunami.

It is easy to remember that a SIMILE is a STATED comparison, that is, the similarity is STATED. Both "simile" and "stated' begin with an "s". A metaphor does not state a comparison.
 
metaphor directly states the similarity as though the two things being compared are one and the same; ex. life is but a dream
simile uses the word like to show similarity; ex. life is like a dream
 

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Jonathan E. | Princeton Advantage: Test Prep/Social Studies/English/Chinese TutorPrinceton Advantage: Test Prep/Social St...
5.0 5.0 (7 lesson ratings) (7)
5

A simile is a figurative comparison between two things using "like" or "as" - ex. Life is like a box of chocolates.

A metaphor is also a figurative comparison between two things, but does not use "like" or "as" - ex. All the world's a stage.

Keep in mind that a simile is a type of metaphor, so all similes are technically metaphors.

Good luck with your worksheet!

Crystal K. | Patient Math, Writing, SAT TutorPatient Math, Writing, SAT Tutor
4.9 4.9 (65 lesson ratings) (65)
3

Both simile and metaphor are figurative comparisons.

When using a simile, you compare two things using the words like or as.

ex:You're like a firework.

When using a metaphor, you compare two things directly. No need to use like or as.

ex: You're a firework.

With a simile, you are like something. With a metaphor, you are something.

 

Jessica V. | English TeacherEnglish Teacher
1

Metaphors and simlies can be confusing sometimes, because they are very similar. Both are forms of figurative language. Similies use 'like' or 'as' in them: The sunset was like a blazing fire. OR, The sunset was as intense as a blazing fire. Helpful hint: similie has an 'L' in it, so think 'L': 'like' or 'as'. Metaphors compare two items without such buffer words: The sunset was a blazing fire.

Natalia E. | Experienced K-12 educator in your journey toward academic success!Experienced K-12 educator in your journ...
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A simile is comparing to things using the words "like" or "as"

A metaphore compares things WITHOUT using the words "like" or "as"

For example:

(using a simile) The girl is as pretty as a rose.

(using a metaphore) The girl is a pretty rose.

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Donna B. | Let Me Be Your TutorLet Me Be Your Tutor
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Both a simile and a metaphor are literary techniques to compare two things with a descriptive phrase. Yes, a Simile is easier to spot because it is a STATED comparison using "like" or "as". The difference with a metaphor is the comparison is implied directly. Example: My cat is like a dog following me on a path. This is a simile. My cat is a dog following me on my path. That is a metaphor.

The phrase "I am as hungry as a horse", does not mean I will eat hay or really eat that much food but it is Not a Simile because it is not comparing two things. It describes the degree of the horse's hunger but does not equate the horse with the hunger.

Suzanne M. | English Tutor: Literature, Reading, Grammar, Writing, VocabularyEnglish Tutor: Literature, Reading, Gram...
4.0 4.0 (2 lesson ratings) (2)
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Both similes and metaphors are literary techniques used to compare two different things; however, they do so differently. A simile is a comparison that uses "like" or "as" in the comparison. A metaphor is a comparison that says something is something else. Examples: A simile--"He was like a lion in battle." A Metaphor--"Her smile was a bright light in a dark, dark tunnel."

Beverly C. | English Tutor: Helping you say what you want to say!English Tutor: Helping you say what you ...
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Both are examples of figurative language.

With a simile, you are comparing two things using "like" or "as."

For example: His smile was as big as the Grand Canyon.

This comparison illustrates that this mans smile was huge, comparing it to the Grand Canyon.

I like to think of a metaphor as a stronger simile. With a metaphor, the two things being compared are so much alike that they no longer are "like" something but they are something.

For example: His smile was the Grand Canyon.

This is still a comparison only now it no longer uses "like" or "as." The mans smile was so big, it WAS the Grand Canyon.

Rachel R. | NCLEX-R, NCLEX-PN, TEAS, HESI, NursingNCLEX-R, NCLEX-PN, TEAS, HESI, Nursing
4.8 4.8 (184 lesson ratings) (184)
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The easiest way to rememer this is: "S" A Simile is a Stated comparison. (A metaphor is not stated.) Metaphor: The new student was a little tornado gathering strength. Simile: The new student was like a volcano overflowing with angry lava. If the sentence has the word "like" in it, comparing two things, it is a simile because the comparison is stated.

Kevin S. | DePaul English Major offering expertise in writingDePaul English Major offering expertise ...
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Everyone here has listed fantastic definitions and examples. I find simile and metaphor to be some of the most fun and easy comparison tools in a writer's tool box. Simile uses like and as to create a comparison and metaphor does not. 

Liam M. | British Qualified Elementary School TeacherBritish Qualified Elementary School Teac...
5.0 5.0 (50 lesson ratings) (50)
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Similes use 'as' or 'like' to describe something by relating it to something similar (Hence Simile) For example He was as quick as a fox and metaphors do the same but do not use 'as' or 'like' and the two things mentioned are usually completely unrelated. For example the curtain of night.