20 Answered Questions for the topic traducción

06/26/19

Can Spanish distinguish between "lonely" and "alone"?

I learned that *solo* in Spanish means both "alone" (the simple fact of not having anyone else around) and "lonely" (feeling sad because of being alone). Is there any way of distinguishing between... more

06/26/19

Armpit: sobaco vs. axila?

Armpit in English can be translated as either *sobaco* or *axila* in Spanish. Is each term used in different regions, or are they both used across the Spanish-speaking world? What is the... more

06/25/19

How do you say "I'm gonna get you!"?

When I'm chasing my baby around the room, I frequently tell him, "I'm gonna get you!" and catch him and tickle him. Is there a similar expression in Spanish? I'd love to find something that can... more

06/25/19

How to say "because!" in Spanish?

In English when you don't want to give answer or when you don't have answer and a person asks you "why?" some people then answer: "because!". What is corresponding word in Spanish?I've checked the... more

06/25/19

How do you differentiate between walnuts and pecans in Spanish?

It recently occurred to me that the Spanish *nuez* can be translated to English as both "walnut" and "pecan." Is the same word really used for both types of nuts? How would you specify which nut... more

06/25/19

Why is "Santiago" the equivalent of "James"?

Most Spanish names are quite similar to the equivalent in English, such as:- Juan → John- Pedro → Peter- Maria → MaryBut what's up with this one?- Santiago → JamesWhat's the connection? How do the... more

06/25/19

Translation of "bug" to Spanish?

What is the best way to translate "bug", as in a misfeature of a computer program or device?Google translate offers a few options, none of which quite seem to fit, except the term itself:- bug ... more

06/24/19

How can I say "to take the derivative" (mathematics) in spanish?

In English, we generally use phrases like "take the derivative", "find the derivative", "evaluate the derivative", but we also use verbs such as "derivate", "derive", "differentiate", etc. What... more

06/23/19

Translation of "Welcome back!"?

In English, if someone has been gone for a while and has recently returned, it's common to greet them by saying, "Welcome back!" (or "Welcome back from your trip!", etc). What is the most natural... more

06/23/19

How to translate the idiom: "missing the point"?

What would be the correct way to translate into Spanish the idiom: "to miss the point"?I'm often tempted to write "perder el punto", but it doesn't sound quite right.For example: "To bring... more

06/23/19

Vegetable: verdura vs. vegetal?

What is the difference between *verduras* and *vegetales*? In what situations can one be used as a translation for "vegetables" and the other cannot?

06/21/19

Equivalent expression for "straw that broke the camel's back"?

Is there an equivalent phrase in Spanish for "the straw that broke the camel's back"? The phrase usually refers to to the final thing that is added to a bunch of things to cause a large reaction... more

06/21/19

How should I translate "table" (as in a data table)?

What should be the correct word in Spanish to translate "table" (as in an arrangement of text or data in rows and columns)?Somewhere I've read that "cuadro" should be preferred to "tabla", but... more

06/20/19

How does one say "It's not nothing."?

In English, we can express the idea that something is not negative, such as:> A: What's in the box?> B: Oh, nothing.> A: **It's not nothing!**In English, the double negative (*not* and... more

06/20/19

How might you say a child is "cute" in Spanish?

Suppose you see a mother with a laughing little 2-year-old. In English, we might exclaim, "how cute!"I've had trouble saying this in Spanish. The word "cute" means something like "beautiful", but... more

06/19/19

Is there a Spanish equivalent for "OP"?

The English abbreviation *OP* for the term *Original Poster* is widely used over the internet. Do the abbreviation and/or the term have widely used equivalents in Spanish?

06/18/19

Where did "pico de gallo" get its name?

Does *pico de gallo* (the type of salsa) literally translate as "rooster's beak"? If so, where did it get that name, and how does that describe the salsa?

06/17/19

a propósito vs "de paso" to say "by the way"?

How do you say "by the way" in Spanish, as in:> By the way, what's your name?> By the way, where do you live now?> By the way, I met Javier the other day ...Google Translate shows  **a... more

06/17/19

What is the difference between "De nada" and "No hay de qué"?

I am learning Spanish and ran across "De nada" and "No hay de qué". Both mean "You're welcome". What's the difference?

06/17/19

How do you say "I got you!" in Spanish?

If I threw a snowball (or dodgeball) at someone and it hit them, how would I say :> I got you!in Spanish?

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