Asked • 03/25/19

Is the following example a case of double negatives in Spanish?

I'm reading a book titled, "El Quijote: Para estudiantes de espanol" The construction of the following sentence confuses me: > Segun las leyes de caballeros; no podia luchar con nadie hasta que **no > fuese armado caballero**. > > According to the laws of chivalry he could not fight anyone until he > **was not knighted.** If 'hasta que' can be translated to 'if', then this sentence makes sense to me. > According to the laws of chivalry he could not fight anyone if he > **was not knighted.** However, I've never seen 'hasta que' translated to mean 'if'. Can someone explain to me the construction of this sentence? Is this just a case of where double negatives are acceptable in Spanish, unlike en English?

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