Amy B.

asked • 03/19/21

Latin translation: strength and love

Is there a Latin scholar who would kindly translate the phrases below?


”strength and love”


”find love”


”everything from love”

1 Expert Answer

By:

Amy B.

thank you - so interesting and helpful! it is for an engraving. I was curious about Aeneid and found this: “Arma virumque canō, Trōiae quī prīmus ab ōrīs Ītaliam, fātō profugus, Lāvīniaque vēnit lītora, multum ille et terrīs iactātus et altō vī superum saevae memorem Iūnōnis ob īram; multa quoque et bellō passūs, dum conderet urbem, inferretque deōs Latiō, genus unde Latīnum, Albānīque patrēs, atque altae moenia Rōmae.” You are referring to “Arma virumque..”?
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03/19/21

Russell B.

tutor
Yes! It means "arms [= weapons] and the man" and refers to the hero Aeneas and the fighting he must do to establish what would become Rome. These first two words recall Virgil's predecessor Homer and his two great (Greek) epics: the Iliad (about arms) and the Odyssey (about a man). Of course, the phrase "love and strength" doesn't really have anything to do with this ... but it sounds almost like a swapping of the first two words (the "-que" at the end is the part that means "and", at it actually comes AFTER the word ... how cool is that?). Also, I should say: "vires" has more the connotations of physical strength (maybe even "manliness'!). If you want something that means something more like mental or emotional strength, then "fortitudo" might be a bit better; so: "fortitudo et amor".
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03/19/21

Amy B.

wow, so cool, I love it! Makes me want to study Latin! thank you!
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03/19/21

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