Asked • 08/06/19

Filling' up a school setting without making a bunch of new characters?

In a school setting, what is a way to allude that a school is full of students, without making new characters or overusing pre-existing ones?A school is the main setting of a book. The main and secondary characters majorly consist of students. In classes and school gatherings, I assume it would be overwhelming to always refer to a new character, or monotonous when referring to a pre-existing character, when commenting on the buzz of the environment or the reactions of students in the same room/area. In this sense, is it better to be general?For example, a school assembly is occurring. The main character walks in, examining the scene. The aim of the text at this point is to comment on the various behaviours of the students in that environment, in order to discuss the variety and buzz of the students in the school. At this point, new characters will have to be introduced. It would be repetitive to talk about other main/secondary characters who are in the assembly hall as mentioning them would show no variety at all. Of course, when the main character decides to go sit with their friends (who are other main/secondary characters), it would be appropriate to mention them again.It could look something like this:> Suzy, who was drawn in by the bustle of her chattering peers, timidly walked through the entrance passage of the assembly hall and into the large room. Behind her wisp of hair, she inspected her surroundings. Among the crowd of students was Rob, a red-head with a troubled uniform, who rest his feet atop the empty chair in front of him. Though the room was full of astir teenagers his voice was distinct and high, squawking louder than the rest about cars and rocket fuel. To the right of the room sat piercingly-blonde Georgia among her flock of clone-like friends. She, though very opinionated, was abnormally quiet for such a lively space.An alternative to this would be just to sketch, in general terms, the busyness of the room. This could be done by referring to students without providing them a name, or talking about the group of students in a broad manner.Take the previous scene, for example:> Suzy, who was drawn in by the bustle of her chattering peers, timidly walked through the entrance passage of the assembly hall and into the large room. Behind her wisp of hair, she inspected her surroundings. Among the crowd of students a red-head with a troubled uniform rest his feet atop the empty chair in front of him. Though the room was full of astir teenagers his voice was distinct and high, squawking louder than the rest about cars and rocket fuel. To the right of the room sat a piercing blonde among her flock of clone-like friends. She looked abnormally quiet for such a lively space.And further:> Suzy, who was drawn in by the bustle of her chattering peers, timidly walked through the entrance passage of the assembly hall and into the large room. Behind her wisp of hair, she inspected her surroundings. Among the crowd, students talked in a lively manner, some about their weekends and others about rocket fuel. A distinct amount sat silently, back sunken into their red seats, awaiting the teachers to commence the assembly. Suzy couldn't help but believe these students thought such an event was a waste of time.The last example does change the scene quite a bit, but it allows for the reader to see the whole room, rather than a few students in the room. However, this method does remove the authenticity of the school, especially since such a setting has many situations where many students will be in the same room at once (eg. classes, assemblies, sports days, etc).I'm worried about creating new characters in such scenes as there is a high chance they will probably not be mentioned again, which can confuse the reader as to why they were included in the first place. **TL;DR** – What would be the best way to continue to refer to students, who aren't main/secondary characters, in order to authenticate the 'size' of the school? Would it be best, in some cases to create new characters? Or would it be better to be general about these students and focus more on the main characters in that environment?Thanks!

2 Answers By Expert Tutors

By:

John G. answered • 08/09/19

Specialist in Research Projects, Story Continuity

Michael C. answered • 08/07/19

Financial, investment, and business professional

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