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Generally, the representatives (compose) a legislature are constitutionally elected by a broad spectrum of the population.

i have no idea!! what goes in the blank?? 

Generally, the representatives which compose to? 

Comments

Compose and comprise are synonyms, both being verbs forms, meaning consisting of. Being present tense, as represented by the word are, the "ing" needs to be added in the example sentence. Comprising is the favored word, since composing often refers to words, rather than people.

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Cullen S. | Portuguese, Spanish, and English tutorPortuguese, Spanish, and English tutor
3.0 3.0 (1 lesson ratings) (1)
5

I would use "composing", being that the question is looking for a form of "compose".  There is no indication that other words should be added.

Comments

Cullen has it. What we need is a way of rendering a relative clause (who/which/that compose) which, presumably, only modifies the word in the parentheses. The participle 'composing' does that: those composing a legislature are those who compose a legislature.

Compose and comprise are synonyms, both being verbs forms, meaning consisting of. Being present tense, as represented by the word are, the "ing" needs to be added in the example sentence. Comprising is the favored word, since composing often refers to words, rather than people.

Penny K. | Learn Word Wizardry from Ivy League Grad / Draw, paint - communicate!Learn Word Wizardry from Ivy League Grad...
4.6 4.6 (13 lesson ratings) (13)
4

"Which" can be used when writing about things. "Who make up" is an acceptable choice; however, "composing" or "comprising" will provide a more concise, active voice.

Comments

Compose and comprise are synonyms, both being verbs forms, meaning consisting of. Being present tense, as represented by the word are, the "ing" needs to be added in the example sentence. Comprising is the favored word, since composing often refers to words, rather than people.    

Chhavi P. | Master the English Language - It's not as Hard as it Looks!Master the English Language - It's not a...
4.9 4.9 (138 lesson ratings) (138)
1

Either the answer should be: the representatives who compose the legislature, or the representatives comprising the legislature.

Compose would mean- construct

comprise would mean- to consist of, to make up.

Laura S. | Results-Driven Language Arts CoachResults-Driven Language Arts Coach
4.9 4.9 (191 lesson ratings) (191)
1

It seems that "comprised" is the better word choice here as it refers to a group which is organized together.  It might flow well to follow with the preposition "in" to show the location of this group and that it is a group.  "Compose" more refers to the definition of "create something".

Trisha B. | Experienced ESL, TOEFL, Pronunciation, Business English ProfessorExperienced ESL, TOEFL, Pronunciation, B...
0

Hi Alvaro,

Great Question.  This is an example of a subject adjective clause.  You could use "who compose" or you can reduce the subject adjective clause to a modifying adjective phrase by dropping the relative pronoun "who" and just using the verb in the "ing" form.  Therefore, the answer would be "Generally, the representatives composing a legislature are constitutionally elected by a broad spectrum of the population.  

Are you studying for the TOEFL?  This seems like a TOEFL question.  I am an experienced TOEFL/ESL professor and live in the San Francisco area.  I would be happy to help you.  

Gregory W. | Certified and Experienced Teacher, Proficient in Many AreasCertified and Experienced Teacher, Profi...
5.0 5.0 (9 lesson ratings) (9)
0

perhaps it could be "comprising"

Comments

Yes, that makes the most sense, Gregory. I agree with you.
Sandy W. | Resourceful and Passionate Multi -Subject TutorResourceful and Passionate Multi -Subjec...
5.0 5.0 (46 lesson ratings) (46)
0

I believe the answer is,

Generally the representatives who compose a legislature are constitutionally elected by a broad spectrum of the population.

Jennifer C. | English/ Reading, Writing, Research (Analysis Strength)English/ Reading, Writing, Research (Ana...
-1

"representatives composing a legislative branch" sounds best to me. But I agree a concise form of compose is the best option.

Jason P. | English/Spanish Tutor (CRLA Certified)English/Spanish Tutor (CRLA Certified)
-1

Who compose sounds good to me. Who composes? The respresentatives compose the legislature.

Chhuong S. | Considerate, Understanding, Patient, Considerate, Understanding, Patient,
-1

This building is comprised of East, West and South. He composes this piece of music. Certainly use the word compose, which sounds better. The representatives compose a legislature branch.

Rachel Kay K. | Creative Teaching Techniques for Students Who Learn DifferentlyCreative Teaching Techniques for Student...
4.9 4.9 (34 lesson ratings) (34)
-1

If you want to use an active verb, then "composing" is the correct choice. You can also say "who compose", but it is less concise.

Merry W. | Motivating Students to Learn: K - Adult!Motivating Students to Learn: K - Adult...
5.0 5.0 (8 lesson ratings) (8)
-2

Compose and comprise are synonyms, both being verbs forms, meaning consisting of. Being present tense, as represented by the word are, the "ing" needs to be added in the example sentence. Comprising is the favored word, since composing often refers to words, rather than to people.

James J. | "Professor J" Tutoring New Students at Every Level; Writing Specialist"Professor J" Tutoring New Students at E...
-2

Compose would be the more appropriate answer (if one is referrring to the inclusion of persons). Comprise is considered correct for scientific elements (i.e., "The experiment was comprised of a ....")

Josiah L. | English Teacher Knowledgeable in Academic Writing and ReadingEnglish Teacher Knowledgeable in Academi...
4.6 4.6 (10 lesson ratings) (10)
-2

We could use 'who compose' if we mean 'the representatives' -- which ones? --> the ones who compose legislature.

Also possible would be 'composing' which suggests the ongoing nature of their participation.

 

The representatives are, we assume, people or agents so we should use the active form rather than are composing while the simple form, compose, shouldn't be used without a relative clause -- which requires who.

Amanda A. | Experienced Teacher and Education Professional w/ Test-Prep ExperienceExperienced Teacher and Education Profes...
4.9 4.9 (8 lesson ratings) (8)
-2

Many things could work - "who compose" or even simply "in" could be fine.