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Carmilla F.

asked • 05/09/20

Need help on Grammar Homework

What is the adverb? What is the adjective that is modified by the adverb?

Carefully planted decoys attracted ducks to the pond. 

(This one confuses me because they got "planted" and "attracted." I don't know which one should be the adjective that is modified by the adverb...I mean they both are verbs? I don't know which one works as an adjective...)


Pick the correct word.

This works the (best, better) of the two shampoos. 

(This one confuses me a lot because it would sound bad if I pick "better", but there is only two things that are being compared; in my textbook, it says use the superlative when comparing three or more persons or things...the textbook also gave me an example: "Of the two blenders, this one works better"....so I have no idea, very confuse.)


The teacher needed (this/that) type of stencil.


(This/That) was the funniest skit I had ever seen.


Identify the parts of speech of the underlined words. (Write noun, pronoun, adjective, adverb, preposition, conjunction, or interjection)

...obey your parents in all things....


And it came to pass on a certain day, as he was teaching, that there were Pharisees and doctors....


Parents have learned what is right, and what is wrong...


And as children pass the first years of their life with their parents, they may be continually learning...

(The word “as” have a lot of functions. It can be in many parts of the speech...so confusing, please help)


But the reasonableness of this command to obey parents is clear and easily understood by children, even when quite young. 

(The word “But” is a start of the sentence according to the sentence above, so that is why I capitalized it)


Parents therefore are bound by duty and by right to govern their children; but the exercise for this right is to be regulated by affection.

(The word "but" for both sentences confuses me a lot because it could be preposition or conjunction...I don't know.)


And it came to pass on a certain day, as He was teaching, that...


He hath made Him to be sin for us, who knew no sin; that we might….

(This one confuses me a lot because the word "for" can also be preposition...or conjunction.)


What is the part of the speech of the word "whereon"?

And immediately he rose up before them, and took up that where on he lay, departed to his own house....


What is the part of the speech of the word "But"?

He said unto him, Man, thy sins are forgiven thee....But that ye know that the Son of Man hath power upon earth to forgive sins. 

(The way of the sentence is exactly like that. There is “....” between “thee” and “But” in the text - just in case you think I skipped some words)

2 Answers By Expert Tutors

By:

Mary S. answered • 05/09/20

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4.6 (11)

Experienced and Flexible Math and Spanish Tutor for All Levels

Mary S.

Continued from above: Identify the parts of speech of the underlined words. (Write noun, pronoun, adjective, adverb, preposition, conjunction, or interjection) **For all of these parts of speech, consider what the function of the word is. Is it describing something? If so, what does it describe? Is it an action or state of being? Is it a person/place/thing/idea? Those questions will help you figure out what part of speech it is** ...obey your parents in all things.... -"all" is describing 'things' so it is an adjective And it came to pass on a certain day, as he was teaching, that there were Pharisees and doctors.... -"there" is replacing people (Pharisees, doctors) so it is a pronoun Parents have learned what is right, and what is wrong... -"what" is replacing an idea (the idea that they learned) so it is a pronoun And as children pass the first years of their life with their parents, they may be continually learning... -How is "as" functioning in this sentence? "As" is connecting two clauses "children pass," and "they may be learning" so it's a conjunction (it would be a subordinating conjunction because the clause "as children pass" doesn't stand alone) But the reasonableness of this command to obey parents is clear and easily understood by children, even when quite young.  -"But" is connecting the two clauses "but the reasonableness is clear..." and "even when," so it is a conjunction. This is slightly confusing because "even when quite young" might not seem like a complete clause. The implied meaning is "even when they are quite young" which looks more like a complete clause. Parents therefore are bound by duty and by right to govern their children; but the exercise for this right is to be regulated by affection. -Again, "but" is functioning as a connector of two clauses "parents are.." and "the exercise is..." so it is a conjunction. But is rarely a preposition. It would only be a preposition if you're using it like 'except for,' e.g. "I like every animal but snakes" And it came to pass on a certain day, as He was teaching, that... -"as" is introducing a clause "he was teacher" so it's a conjunction. One way to know the difference is what word could replace 'as'. If "while" is the replacement, it's a conjunction (while is also a conjunction). He hath made Him to be sin for us, who knew no sin; that we might…. -"for" is relating 'us' and 'made' so it is a preposition. Since it's not starting a new clause ("us" isn't a complete clause), it isn't a conjunction. What is the part of the speech of the word "whereon"? And immediately he rose up before them, and took up that where on he lay, departed to his own house.... -"whereon" is describing where he lay so it is an adverb (describing the verb lay) What is the part of the speech of the word "But"? He said unto him, Man, thy sins are forgiven thee....But that ye know that the Son of Man hath power upon earth to forgive sins.  -If I'm reading the sentence correctly, "but" is connecting the clauses "sins are forgiven" and "ye know" so it is a conjunction. The meaning is more like "so that" but it's still functioning as a connector between two clauses.
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05/09/20

Mary S.

Sorry it's hard to read. I couldn't include the entire response in one post.
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05/09/20

Barbara K.

tutor
I won’t go through Mary’s full answer, but she’s wrong on the second question. As your textbook says, use superlatives only when you’re comparing more than two things (though this isn’t usually attended to in informal writing or speech). “Better” works just as well with “the” as “best.” “The better choice,” “the faster runner,” “the better half” are all familiar uses of comparisons of just two things.
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05/09/20

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