Ephraim N.

asked • 08/23/19

Is there any hard and fast rule for placing a coordinate adjective that is modified by an adverb first in a set or series of such adjectives?

For example, I want to describe a special type of fire. I could say, "Extremely hot, flowing yellowish-green flames began to come off of the wood," or I could say, "Flowing, extremely hot yellowish-green flames began to come off of the wood." The former obviously sounds much better due to the adverb hanging in between in the latter, and I am aware that "flowing," in this case, could serve as a cumulative adjective; however, in this special instance, I am describing the flames as "extremely hot and flowing" or "so extremely hot that it flows like liquid." The flowing nature of the flames is due to the high amount of pure heat, so I am NOT describing "flowing flames that are extremely hot." I am describing "extremely hot, FLOWING flames."

3 Answers By Expert Tutors

By:

Ephraim N.

Marvelous! (I see what you did there!) That was astoundingly clever. Took me a bit to catch on to it. Thanks a bunch for your time and for letting me know that it's okay to have a coordinate adjective modified by an adverb after a preceding coordinate adjective. Just you using it alone is word enough for me.
Report

08/24/19

Brent W. answered • 08/23/19

Tutor
New to Wyzant

Teacher of English Literature and Writing

Ephraim N.

Ah, I see. I shall certainly consider what you have taught me this day. Thank you for your input. It is much appreciated. Oh, and thanks a bunch for confirming the grammatical correctness of it.
Report

08/24/19

Joel K. answered • 09/01/19

Tutor
New to Wyzant

M.A. in English with 7+ Years of Tutoring Experience

Still looking for help? Get the right answer, fast.

Ask a question for free

Get a free answer to a quick problem.
Most questions answered within 4 hours.

OR

Find an Online Tutor Now

Choose an expert and meet online. No packages or subscriptions, pay only for the time you need.