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If l=0, the only possible value for ml would also be 0, right?

I have a question asking the number of electrons in an atom with the following quantum numbers:
 
n=2 
l=0
ml=+1
ms= -1/2
 
since l=0 the only possible value for ml would also be 0, wouldn't it? Considering the restriction that ml can only be -l to +l?
Is this a trick question..?

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J.R. S. | Ph.D. in Biochemistry--University Professor--Chemistry TutorPh.D. in Biochemistry--University Profes...
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It may be a trick question, but you are correct.  ml goes from -l to +l so if l = 0, ml can only be 0.  The number of orbitals will be 1, but the value of ml will be 0.