Asked • 04/11/19

What is the deeper meaning of "The Tyger"?

William Blake's poem ["The Tyger"](https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems/43687/the-tyger) is part of his collection [*Songs of Innocence and of Experience*](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Songs_of_Innocence_and_of_Experience), an extraordinary set of poems which explores ideas such as spirituality, love, poverty, repression, all expressed and contrasted in beautiful language often involving children or animals. "The Tyger", however, doesn't have any immediately obvious (to me) deeper meaning. It seems to be mostly a banal and repetitive, albeit poetically written, description of a tiger and its creation. Usually in a Song of Experience one would expect to see either more pessimism and cynicism or a depiction of the cruelty of society. I think I'm not really grasping the *point* of this poem, but since it's Blake, I'm sure there is one hiding somewhere in the subtext. **What is the deeper meaning of "The Tyger"?**

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