John R.

asked • 11/19/12

infinite limits and e^x

I understand that as x approaches (+) infinity, e^x = infinity.

I also understand that as x approaches (-) infinity, e^x = 0.  The graph makes sense.

So, as x approaches (-) infinity, -e^x = infinity...  Is this true?

1 Expert Answer

By:

Taylor C. answered • 11/19/12

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4.7 (16)

Physics graduate tutoring in math and sciences.

Daniel O.

You could add that, as x approaches -infinity, e^x approaches 0+ (zero from the positive side of the y-axis) and -e^x approaches 0- (zero from the negative side of the y-axis).

More simply, ie from a graph, as x approaches negative infinity, e^x approaches zero from above, and -e^x approaches zero from below.

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11/19/12

John R.

OK...  thanks!   That's what I suspected.  I think my solutions guide is wrong...

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11/19/12

Daniel O.

What does your solutions guide say? e^(-x) would approach infinity as x approaches negative infinity.

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11/19/12

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