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can you have the asvab test read to you?

I want to no if you can have the asvab test read to you if u don't no how to reed that well.
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5 Answers

How to improve one's reading skills, or learn to read
 
I have a suggestion for a method that I have not tested or looked in reports about  reading instruction to learn if it is valid.
 
       Information about reading instruction
 
A source of free public access literature that every taxpayer has paid for is the ERIC database  http://eric.ed.gov   .  The Thesaurus used for indexing uses the term " Reading Instruction " with one broader term " Instruction" above, " Reading Instruction" , 7 narrower terms below it, and 32 related terms
 
An untested method
 
My untested method, which I have suggested to students, is to go to a library and find the audio book section.  Public libraries usually use the Dewey Decimal classification; I will suggest some classification numbers soon.  Audio books may be separated into sections such as Biography , Fiction, Mystery, Crime, Science Fiction, and other categories.  Some authors may have several books available in audio book .   Take several audiobook boxes from the same author and go to the printed book section
 
Look for print copy books that match an audio book.  Check out the print book copy AND the audio book copy of a title to bring home.  CDs will play in a computer if you do not have a combination radio/CD player .   Read the print book as you listen to the audio book.  A numbered CD is usually the same printed book chapter.   
 
Another way to do tis is to use YouTube.  I used the words  subtitled English movies, and find 9 different production sources.  The Jennifer Banks story series  have one sentence on a picture, and then goes to the next sentence.
 
VOA Learning English is a production of the U.S. Government Voice of America agency that produces stories about the U.S. and its people that are broadcast by short-wave radio or streamed on the internet.  The VOA has developed a 1500 word vocabulary of English language words, Special English, that are used on some VOA programs.  Special English is a vocabulary that new student speakers of English can learn and converse with those who speak English as a first language.
 
The online dictionary from Merriam-Webster  http:// ; learnersdictionary . com / 3000-words.html has an alphabetical list of words.  Each entry shows the breakdown into syllables, pronunciation, some definitions, and an audio file of a person who speaks the word using a sentence.  Other publisers of English language dictionaries have created 3000-word dictionary word sites of their own.  A 10,000 word English vocabulary with  frequency of use of the word in spoken English can be found through internet searches.
Forgive the bluntness of my answer. If you are looking to enlist in the Armed Forces, you need to know how to read. If you can not pass the reading comprehension portion of the ASVAB, you may not enlist. Soldiers and sailors need to be able to interpret orders and directions quickly. There is often not enough time to stop and have it read to you and try to guess.
 
The Armed forces currently are picky about enlistees.
 
If you are  joining to interpret languages, you may have a chance. Check with the recruiter if you are going into one of these programs.

The answer to this question depends on your status. If you are a potential applicant taking the ASVAB for enlistment purposes, then the answer is no. However, if you are a high school student, taking the ASVAB assessment as part of the ASVAB Career Exploration Program and your IEP (Individual Education Plan) allows for this modification, then the answer is yes. This is also true if you're a student with a visual impairment. I hope this answers your question.

I do NOT think you can. In regards to your question, I looked at https:http://forums.goarmy.com/message/505522. I suggest you check it out, and read for yourself. I hope this was helpful! :) -sophia
Hi Greg,
There are 4 parts of the ASVAB that determine whether you earn a high enough score to become eligible for enlistment. Two of these parts are Word Knowledge and Paragraph Comprehension. Since you would need to know definitions of words as well as have an understanding of the written word I would assume there is no way to have the ASVAB read to you.
As a veteran, it was my experience that all manuals, documents, test materials, etc. were written on a 9th grade reading level. It would probably benefit you to take some courses or get some tutoring to get to that level at minimum.
Dan