Search

Chuck Y.

Patient and Understanding Former High School Math Teacher

Patient and Understanding Former High School Math Teacher

$40/hour

  • 965 hours tutoring

  • Circle C Ranch Austin, TX 78749

"Great Tutor for Algebra 2"

NIna, 6 lessons with Chuck

See Chuck Y.’s schedule

Response time: 2 hours

About Chuck


Bio

TUTORING PHILOSOPHY

Having taught over 1000 high school students while teaching math at St. Michael's Catholic Academy, I have found that each student, regardless of age (middle school, high school or even post-secondary) is a unique person who has their own learning style. The key to successful learning via tutoring is to identify that style and use it motivate the student to gain knowledge.

There are two major components to my teaching style: whenever possible:

1. provide more than...

TUTORING PHILOSOPHY

Having taught over 1000 high school students while teaching math at St. Michael's Catholic Academy, I have found that each student, regardless of age (middle school, high school or even post-secondary) is a unique person who has their own learning style. The key to successful learning via tutoring is to identify that style and use it motivate the student to gain knowledge.

There are two major components to my teaching style: whenever possible:

1. provide more than one way to solve a problem; and
2. use real-world examples to make visual connections to math problems

Bottom line: these thoughts should enable us to have fun while working together. I expect nothing less.

CAREER HIGHLIGHTS

After graduating from UT, I was a process engineer in the semiconductor manufacturing industry for 15 years. I was fortunate enough to travel the world while working for companies such as Motorola, Applied Materials, and Varian Associates. For another 10 years, I was a consultant, trainer, and book publisher.

I then took the opportunity to become a teacher at a private school here in Austin for nine years, where I taught Pre-algebra, Algebra 2, Pre-AP Algebra 2, and AP Statistics. During my tenure, I went to Graduate School at Texas State University (San Marcos) and obtained my Texas Teaching Certificate and an M.A. in Education.

EDUCATION

UT Austin: BA (Math) and BS in Electrical Engineering
State of Texas Math Teachers Certification
Texas State University: M. A. (Remedial and Adult Education)

TRAINING EXPERIENCE

Throughout my career, I have been involved with training adults, including one year teaching electronics at a business college, one year teaching customer maintenance and repair courses, and 15 years training engineers, technicians, maintenance personnel and operators in statistics, metrology, and in key aspects of ion implantation. And currently, I am a reporter for veterans' affairs for Examiner.com here in Austin.

PUBLICATIONS

I have over 80 published articles in peer-reviewed journals and conferences proceedings, trade magazines, newsletters, as well as a number of white papers. I have also written or edited seven books related to ion implantation and contributed to a number of chapters in textbooks used in technical schools at international conferences.

MISCELLANEOUS

* US Army including Vietnam service. Awards include Purple Heart, Bronze Star, and Army Commendation Medal
* 33-year triathlete; participated in over 100 triathlons and multi-sport races
* Member of Bugles Across America (we play Taps at military funerals and special events)
* Member of the University of Texas Longhorn Alumni Band
* Member of the Austin Community College Stage Ensemble Band


Education

(University of Texas at Austin
BS Electrical Eng.
Texas State U.
Masters
(University of Texas at Austin
Other

Policies

  • Hourly rate: $40
  • Rate details: Minimum session is one hour. We can discuss rates for more than one student.
  • Tutor’s lessons: In-person
  • Travel policy: Within 16 miles of Austin, TX 78749
  • Lesson cancellation: 2 hours notice required
  • Background check passed on 5/15/2014

  • Your first lesson is backed by our Good Fit Guarantee

Schedule

Loading...

Sun

Mon

Tue

Wed

Thu

Fri

Sat


Subjects

Art

Composition (Music)

Composition (Music)

I have composed over 50 songs since high school, including one of just about every genre (except "rap"); most of these are ballads that tell a story; and several are classical. In college, I was fortunate to play in a "combo" just to hear the songs I wrote. Many of these songs have lyrics. Indeed, I have written the music, then the lyrics; and I have done the reverse: written the lyrics, then the music. Recently, I took two semesters of music theory and have two courses of music appreciation on my transcript as well. My goal is to get a graduate degree in music so that I may complete my classical symphonies and concertos. I also play trumpet with Bugles Across America, an organization that arranges players like me to play Taps at military funerals and special events. In addition, I have played trumpet with the stage ensemble at Austin Community College for the last two semesters. Granted, I have not yet published any song; however, I do have the knowledge to help anyone "write" a song.

Business

Public Speaking,

Public Speaking

Public speaking is a learned art form; there is no science to it at all. And it’s more than just imagining the audience wearing something unusual (or nothing, which relates to the title of a popular book on presentations). Needless to say, “out of sight; out of mind” is not going to work here while facing an audience and giving your first speech. The best way to learn speaking in public is to follow a guideline such as “The Six Ps”: have a Purpose, be Prepared, Practice with Pfeedback, Performance, and Present using illustrations. As an internationally invited public speaker, presenter, and trainer, and as a certified high school math teacher for nine years, I have a wide variety of experience that will help provide a novice with knowledge and techniques that will reduce their fear of speaking in public, and to assist them in making their first speech a success – and have fun while doing it.
Microsoft Excel, Microsoft Word

Computer

Macintosh,

Macintosh

I got my first Macintosh in 1986 and have owned one ever since. While working at Applied Materials, I prepared Power Point presentations (most people are not aware that Power Point was originally written for the Mac). In 1987, I established communication with AMAT (located in San Jose, CA) and submitted my weekly reports as well as received email via my Mac while on location in Houston, TX. This was the first time in the company's history that this type of communication was established with anything other than a pc. While in Houston, I wrote the first draft of my second book and later published it using Adobe Framemaker. And, in 1992, while working for Ion Implant Services, I used Lotus 1-2-3 for the Mac so that I could develop data and statistics that could be used by the company's pc network. I have always used a Mac - and just ordered a new one.
Microsoft Excel, Microsoft Word

Corporate Training

Public Speaking,

Public Speaking

Public speaking is a learned art form; there is no science to it at all. And it’s more than just imagining the audience wearing something unusual (or nothing, which relates to the title of a popular book on presentations). Needless to say, “out of sight; out of mind” is not going to work here while facing an audience and giving your first speech. The best way to learn speaking in public is to follow a guideline such as “The Six Ps”: have a Purpose, be Prepared, Practice with Pfeedback, Performance, and Present using illustrations. As an internationally invited public speaker, presenter, and trainer, and as a certified high school math teacher for nine years, I have a wide variety of experience that will help provide a novice with knowledge and techniques that will reduce their fear of speaking in public, and to assist them in making their first speech a success – and have fun while doing it.
Grammar, Microsoft Excel, Microsoft Word, Proofreading

Elementary Education

Elementary Math,

Elementary Math

I begin by laying the ground rules, which are simple: if I am going too fast, just let me know and I'll slow down or repeat anything that is necessary. If I am going too slow or covering something they already know, just let me know and we'll move on. The goal here is to establish two-way conversation. As with all of my math students, I tell them I am giving them an empty took kit and that I will be giving them tools with which to solve problems. Some they will use and some they won't - in this course. Keep this kit as it will help them in your next couple of math courses. Secondly, I always ask what steps are being taught by their teacher. I do not want to show them something that they are not allowed to use. For example, many teachers in grade school do not allow cross division in simplifying two fractions being multiplied; they must multiply numerators and denominators first. And lastly, when they do something good, I'll tell them and even ask them to pat themselves on their back. I have never had a difficult time working with youngsters and we always have fun doing math. No, really!
Study Skills,

Study Skills

The best way to begin teaching study skills by first determining how a student learns. Although there are several methods that will accomplish this step, the easiest is to find the student’s Myers-Briggs Type Indicator®. From that starting point, a variety of techniques can be crafted to assist the student in learning study skills, improving their acquisition of knowledge, which ultimately leads to better grades. I acquired the knowledge and skills to tutor students in study skills while working on my M.A. with a major in Developmental and Adult Education. I practiced the study skills that I was learning: I graduated with a 4.0 GPA when I received my Masters degree.
Grammar, Reading, Spelling, Vocabulary

English

Public Speaking,

Public Speaking

Public speaking is a learned art form; there is no science to it at all. And it’s more than just imagining the audience wearing something unusual (or nothing, which relates to the title of a popular book on presentations). Needless to say, “out of sight; out of mind” is not going to work here while facing an audience and giving your first speech. The best way to learn speaking in public is to follow a guideline such as “The Six Ps”: have a Purpose, be Prepared, Practice with Pfeedback, Performance, and Present using illustrations. As an internationally invited public speaker, presenter, and trainer, and as a certified high school math teacher for nine years, I have a wide variety of experience that will help provide a novice with knowledge and techniques that will reduce their fear of speaking in public, and to assist them in making their first speech a success – and have fun while doing it.
Writing,

Writing

I got my start in writing as an Awards Clerk while stationed in Vietnam. In preparation for the position, I perused the files to learn how to properly write the recommendations for the medals. During my tour there, I wrote over 100 recommendations for Silver Star, Distinguished Flying Cross, Air Medal with and without the “V” device (Valor), Bronze Star with and without the “V” device (Valor), Army Commendation Medal, and Purple Heart. After graduating with my BSEE from the University of Texas, I wrote over 80 papers covering various topics in the semiconductor manufacturing industry that were published in conference proceedings, technical journals, and trade magazines. I also wrote five books, and edited two books. I also self-published seven books that were shipped to over 20 countries. I wrote over 30 papers while seeking my M.A. at Texas State University (2008) with a major in Remedial and Adult Education. And finally, since 2010, I have published over 160 articles on veterans affairs for the online magazine, Examiner.
English, Grammar, Proofreading, Reading, Spelling, TOEFL, Vocabulary

Homeschool

Algebra 1,

Algebra 1

I was an engineer in the semiconductor manufacturing industry for 25 years prior to becoming a teacher at St. Michael's Catholic Academy. While there, I taught Algebra 2 for nine years. With this experience, I brought a problem-solving methodology to the classroom. In other words, my teaching practice included providing whenever possible, more than one way to solve a problem. I have been tutoring Algebra 1 students since 2010. Part of my teaching style includes visual demonstrations in my lessons whenever possible, using my hands and drawings on paper. I also include what I call, “extending the lesson”. This means that I add to their lessons topics that would be covered in future math courses. For example, while talking about straight lines and parabolas, I will introduce other figures which includes formulas with higher orders of magnitudes of “x”. These ideas are to address the different learning styles of my students. As with all of my math students, I tell them I am giving them an empty took kit and that I will be giving them tools with which to solve problems. Some they will use and some they won't - in this course. Keep this kit as it will help them in your next couple of math courses. Secondly, I always ask what steps are being taught by their teacher. I do not want to show them something that they are not allowed to use. For example, many teachers in grade school do not allow cross division in simplifying two fractions being multiplied; they must multiply numerators and denominators first. And lastly, when they do something good, I'll tell them and even ask them to pat themselves on their back.
Algebra 2,

Algebra 2

I was an engineer in the semiconductor manufacturing industry for 25 years prior to becoming a teacher at St. Michael's Catholic Academy. While there, I taught Algebra 2 for nine years. With this experience, I brought a problem-solving methodology to the classroom. In other words, my teaching practice included providing whenever possible, more than one way to solve a problem. I also included visual demonstrations whenever possible, using my hands, drawings on the blackboard, and my one and only 'Parabola Dance'. This was where I moved up and down, and left and right, while announcing changes in the general equation of the parabola. These ideas were to address the different learning styles of my students. Needless to say, I have several success stories in the more than 1000 students that I taught over that period.
Prealgebra,

Prealgebra

I devised and taught for five years a summer school pre-algebra program for incoming freshmen students to St. Michael's Catholic Academy (SMCA). All students applying to SMCA must take a placement exam to determine if they are ready to take Algebra 1 that fall. If they performed below standards, then they were required to take the four-week course. It was an homework intensive course covering all of the topics in a typical pre-algebra course. Grades were kept but the course was Pass-Fail.
Study Skills,

Study Skills

The best way to begin teaching study skills by first determining how a student learns. Although there are several methods that will accomplish this step, the easiest is to find the student’s Myers-Briggs Type Indicator®. From that starting point, a variety of techniques can be crafted to assist the student in learning study skills, improving their acquisition of knowledge, which ultimately leads to better grades. I acquired the knowledge and skills to tutor students in study skills while working on my M.A. with a major in Developmental and Adult Education. I practiced the study skills that I was learning: I graduated with a 4.0 GPA when I received my Masters degree.
Writing,

Writing

I got my start in writing as an Awards Clerk while stationed in Vietnam. In preparation for the position, I perused the files to learn how to properly write the recommendations for the medals. During my tour there, I wrote over 100 recommendations for Silver Star, Distinguished Flying Cross, Air Medal with and without the “V” device (Valor), Bronze Star with and without the “V” device (Valor), Army Commendation Medal, and Purple Heart. After graduating with my BSEE from the University of Texas, I wrote over 80 papers covering various topics in the semiconductor manufacturing industry that were published in conference proceedings, technical journals, and trade magazines. I also wrote five books, and edited two books. I also self-published seven books that were shipped to over 20 countries. I wrote over 30 papers while seeking my M.A. at Texas State University (2008) with a major in Remedial and Adult Education. And finally, since 2010, I have published over 160 articles on veterans affairs for the online magazine, Examiner.
English, Reading, SAT Math, Spelling

Language

TOEFL

Math

Algebra 1,

Algebra 1

I was an engineer in the semiconductor manufacturing industry for 25 years prior to becoming a teacher at St. Michael's Catholic Academy. While there, I taught Algebra 2 for nine years. With this experience, I brought a problem-solving methodology to the classroom. In other words, my teaching practice included providing whenever possible, more than one way to solve a problem. I have been tutoring Algebra 1 students since 2010. Part of my teaching style includes visual demonstrations in my lessons whenever possible, using my hands and drawings on paper. I also include what I call, “extending the lesson”. This means that I add to their lessons topics that would be covered in future math courses. For example, while talking about straight lines and parabolas, I will introduce other figures which includes formulas with higher orders of magnitudes of “x”. These ideas are to address the different learning styles of my students. As with all of my math students, I tell them I am giving them an empty took kit and that I will be giving them tools with which to solve problems. Some they will use and some they won't - in this course. Keep this kit as it will help them in your next couple of math courses. Secondly, I always ask what steps are being taught by their teacher. I do not want to show them something that they are not allowed to use. For example, many teachers in grade school do not allow cross division in simplifying two fractions being multiplied; they must multiply numerators and denominators first. And lastly, when they do something good, I'll tell them and even ask them to pat themselves on their back.
Algebra 2,

Algebra 2

I was an engineer in the semiconductor manufacturing industry for 25 years prior to becoming a teacher at St. Michael's Catholic Academy. While there, I taught Algebra 2 for nine years. With this experience, I brought a problem-solving methodology to the classroom. In other words, my teaching practice included providing whenever possible, more than one way to solve a problem. I also included visual demonstrations whenever possible, using my hands, drawings on the blackboard, and my one and only 'Parabola Dance'. This was where I moved up and down, and left and right, while announcing changes in the general equation of the parabola. These ideas were to address the different learning styles of my students. Needless to say, I have several success stories in the more than 1000 students that I taught over that period.
Electrical Engineering,

Electrical Engineering

I received my BSEE from the University of Texas in 1976 and became a practicing process engineer for the next 25 years. My first job was a design engineer for Accelerator's Inc's new ion implanter, a tool used in the manufacture of semiconductor devices. I then worked for Motorola, Applied Materials, Varian Inc., and several other companies. During most of this time, I was considered an expert in my field and was often called to travel to a customer's site to trouble-shoot machine and process problems.. In the meantime, I wrote three books and self-published five books on the ion implant process, the ion implanter, rapid thermal processing, and metrology. I taught electronics courses that led to an associate's degree in electronics at a business college. In addition, I taught my own one-and two-day adult short courses (three of them) throughout the US as well as Taiwan, Germany, and Sweden.
Prealgebra,

Prealgebra

I devised and taught for five years a summer school pre-algebra program for incoming freshmen students to St. Michael's Catholic Academy (SMCA). All students applying to SMCA must take a placement exam to determine if they are ready to take Algebra 1 that fall. If they performed below standards, then they were required to take the four-week course. It was an homework intensive course covering all of the topics in a typical pre-algebra course. Grades were kept but the course was Pass-Fail.
ACT Math, Probability, SAT Math, Trigonometry

Most Popular

Algebra 1,

Algebra 1

I was an engineer in the semiconductor manufacturing industry for 25 years prior to becoming a teacher at St. Michael's Catholic Academy. While there, I taught Algebra 2 for nine years. With this experience, I brought a problem-solving methodology to the classroom. In other words, my teaching practice included providing whenever possible, more than one way to solve a problem. I have been tutoring Algebra 1 students since 2010. Part of my teaching style includes visual demonstrations in my lessons whenever possible, using my hands and drawings on paper. I also include what I call, “extending the lesson”. This means that I add to their lessons topics that would be covered in future math courses. For example, while talking about straight lines and parabolas, I will introduce other figures which includes formulas with higher orders of magnitudes of “x”. These ideas are to address the different learning styles of my students. As with all of my math students, I tell them I am giving them an empty took kit and that I will be giving them tools with which to solve problems. Some they will use and some they won't - in this course. Keep this kit as it will help them in your next couple of math courses. Secondly, I always ask what steps are being taught by their teacher. I do not want to show them something that they are not allowed to use. For example, many teachers in grade school do not allow cross division in simplifying two fractions being multiplied; they must multiply numerators and denominators first. And lastly, when they do something good, I'll tell them and even ask them to pat themselves on their back.
Algebra 2,

Algebra 2

I was an engineer in the semiconductor manufacturing industry for 25 years prior to becoming a teacher at St. Michael's Catholic Academy. While there, I taught Algebra 2 for nine years. With this experience, I brought a problem-solving methodology to the classroom. In other words, my teaching practice included providing whenever possible, more than one way to solve a problem. I also included visual demonstrations whenever possible, using my hands, drawings on the blackboard, and my one and only 'Parabola Dance'. This was where I moved up and down, and left and right, while announcing changes in the general equation of the parabola. These ideas were to address the different learning styles of my students. Needless to say, I have several success stories in the more than 1000 students that I taught over that period.
Prealgebra,

Prealgebra

I devised and taught for five years a summer school pre-algebra program for incoming freshmen students to St. Michael's Catholic Academy (SMCA). All students applying to SMCA must take a placement exam to determine if they are ready to take Algebra 1 that fall. If they performed below standards, then they were required to take the four-week course. It was an homework intensive course covering all of the topics in a typical pre-algebra course. Grades were kept but the course was Pass-Fail.
Study Skills,

Study Skills

The best way to begin teaching study skills by first determining how a student learns. Although there are several methods that will accomplish this step, the easiest is to find the student’s Myers-Briggs Type Indicator®. From that starting point, a variety of techniques can be crafted to assist the student in learning study skills, improving their acquisition of knowledge, which ultimately leads to better grades. I acquired the knowledge and skills to tutor students in study skills while working on my M.A. with a major in Developmental and Adult Education. I practiced the study skills that I was learning: I graduated with a 4.0 GPA when I received my Masters degree.
Writing,

Writing

I got my start in writing as an Awards Clerk while stationed in Vietnam. In preparation for the position, I perused the files to learn how to properly write the recommendations for the medals. During my tour there, I wrote over 100 recommendations for Silver Star, Distinguished Flying Cross, Air Medal with and without the “V” device (Valor), Bronze Star with and without the “V” device (Valor), Army Commendation Medal, and Purple Heart. After graduating with my BSEE from the University of Texas, I wrote over 80 papers covering various topics in the semiconductor manufacturing industry that were published in conference proceedings, technical journals, and trade magazines. I also wrote five books, and edited two books. I also self-published seven books that were shipped to over 20 countries. I wrote over 30 papers while seeking my M.A. at Texas State University (2008) with a major in Remedial and Adult Education. And finally, since 2010, I have published over 160 articles on veterans affairs for the online magazine, Examiner.
English, Reading

Music

Composition (Music),

Composition (Music)

I have composed over 50 songs since high school, including one of just about every genre (except "rap"); most of these are ballads that tell a story; and several are classical. In college, I was fortunate to play in a "combo" just to hear the songs I wrote. Many of these songs have lyrics. Indeed, I have written the music, then the lyrics; and I have done the reverse: written the lyrics, then the music. Recently, I took two semesters of music theory and have two courses of music appreciation on my transcript as well. My goal is to get a graduate degree in music so that I may complete my classical symphonies and concertos. I also play trumpet with Bugles Across America, an organization that arranges players like me to play Taps at military funerals and special events. In addition, I have played trumpet with the stage ensemble at Austin Community College for the last two semesters. Granted, I have not yet published any song; however, I do have the knowledge to help anyone "write" a song.
Ear Training,

Ear Training

Ear Training is a basic skill of music that allows students to recognize and identify individual notes, timbre, rhythms, scales, chords, pitches, and intervals. Such a skill will help students to become a better musician as they learn to sing or play an instrument. My own experience with ear training began when I was in high school learning chords and playing music on the organ. This led me to the point where, after I heard my own music in my head, I was able to write original songs down on music paper. While in college, I transcribed and arranged my songs for my own “combo”; we played them all over central Texas. I have now taken several formal college ear training courses. Coupled with my own experience, I can show young students how they can also play the music they hear in their head on their instrument. Then they can learn, as I have, what a truly wonderful and satisfying accomplishment it is!
General Music,

General Music

It seems like I have been around music all of my life. When I was growing up, my parents had a great selection of 78-rpm records consisting of mostly classical and easy listening. I started to listen to Handel’s Messiah every Christmas and Easter – and still do to this day. After I got my cornet in the 4th Grade, I played Christmas carols on my front porch in San Marcos. Then, I was in the band from junior high through college and still play with the University of Texas Longhorn Alumni Band here in Austin. I also currently play with the Austin Community College Swing Ensemble. I dreamed my first song while I was a senior in high school (of course, it was about my girlfriend) and have been writing music every since. I am now taking music classes at ACC and have a goal of getting my next college degree in music. I would love to have the opportunity to show how music can positively affect the lives of young students.
Songwriting,

Songwriting

I have written over 50 songs since high school, including one of just about every genre (except "rap"); most of these are ballads that tell a story. In college, I was fortunate to play in a "combo" just to hear the songs I wrote. Many of these songs have lyrics. Indeed, I have written the music, then the lyrics; and I have done the reverse: written the lyrics, then the music. Recently, I took two semesters of music theory and have two courses of music appreciation on my transcript as well. Granted, I have not yet published any song; however, I do have the knowledge to help anyone "write" a song.
Trumpet,

Trumpet

I have played trumpet since I was a kid. I played in the Bobcat Band (Southwest Texas State College) in the mid-60s; we played at LBJ's Inauguration Parade after he became president. I then played in the Longhorn Band at the University of Texas for five years. For the last 15 years or so, I have played with the Longhorn Alumni Band. For the last five years, I have played Taps through Bugles Across America at military funerals and special events. And for the last two semesters, I have been playing with the "swing" band (called stage ensemble) at Austin Community College. Lastly, I took two semesters of music theory at ACC.
Music Theory

Other

Study Skills

Study Skills

The best way to begin teaching study skills by first determining how a student learns. Although there are several methods that will accomplish this step, the easiest is to find the student’s Myers-Briggs Type Indicator®. From that starting point, a variety of techniques can be crafted to assist the student in learning study skills, improving their acquisition of knowledge, which ultimately leads to better grades. I acquired the knowledge and skills to tutor students in study skills while working on my M.A. with a major in Developmental and Adult Education. I practiced the study skills that I was learning: I graduated with a 4.0 GPA when I received my Masters degree.

Science

Electrical Engineering

Electrical Engineering

I received my BSEE from the University of Texas in 1976 and became a practicing process engineer for the next 25 years. My first job was a design engineer for Accelerator's Inc's new ion implanter, a tool used in the manufacture of semiconductor devices. I then worked for Motorola, Applied Materials, Varian Inc., and several other companies. During most of this time, I was considered an expert in my field and was often called to travel to a customer's site to trouble-shoot machine and process problems.. In the meantime, I wrote three books and self-published five books on the ion implant process, the ion implanter, rapid thermal processing, and metrology. I taught electronics courses that led to an associate's degree in electronics at a business college. In addition, I taught my own one-and two-day adult short courses (three of them) throughout the US as well as Taiwan, Germany, and Sweden.

Special Needs

Study Skills

Study Skills

The best way to begin teaching study skills by first determining how a student learns. Although there are several methods that will accomplish this step, the easiest is to find the student’s Myers-Briggs Type Indicator®. From that starting point, a variety of techniques can be crafted to assist the student in learning study skills, improving their acquisition of knowledge, which ultimately leads to better grades. I acquired the knowledge and skills to tutor students in study skills while working on my M.A. with a major in Developmental and Adult Education. I practiced the study skills that I was learning: I graduated with a 4.0 GPA when I received my Masters degree.

Summer

Algebra 1,

Algebra 1

I was an engineer in the semiconductor manufacturing industry for 25 years prior to becoming a teacher at St. Michael's Catholic Academy. While there, I taught Algebra 2 for nine years. With this experience, I brought a problem-solving methodology to the classroom. In other words, my teaching practice included providing whenever possible, more than one way to solve a problem. I have been tutoring Algebra 1 students since 2010. Part of my teaching style includes visual demonstrations in my lessons whenever possible, using my hands and drawings on paper. I also include what I call, “extending the lesson”. This means that I add to their lessons topics that would be covered in future math courses. For example, while talking about straight lines and parabolas, I will introduce other figures which includes formulas with higher orders of magnitudes of “x”. These ideas are to address the different learning styles of my students. As with all of my math students, I tell them I am giving them an empty took kit and that I will be giving them tools with which to solve problems. Some they will use and some they won't - in this course. Keep this kit as it will help them in your next couple of math courses. Secondly, I always ask what steps are being taught by their teacher. I do not want to show them something that they are not allowed to use. For example, many teachers in grade school do not allow cross division in simplifying two fractions being multiplied; they must multiply numerators and denominators first. And lastly, when they do something good, I'll tell them and even ask them to pat themselves on their back.
Algebra 2,

Algebra 2

I was an engineer in the semiconductor manufacturing industry for 25 years prior to becoming a teacher at St. Michael's Catholic Academy. While there, I taught Algebra 2 for nine years. With this experience, I brought a problem-solving methodology to the classroom. In other words, my teaching practice included providing whenever possible, more than one way to solve a problem. I also included visual demonstrations whenever possible, using my hands, drawings on the blackboard, and my one and only 'Parabola Dance'. This was where I moved up and down, and left and right, while announcing changes in the general equation of the parabola. These ideas were to address the different learning styles of my students. Needless to say, I have several success stories in the more than 1000 students that I taught over that period.
Study Skills,

Study Skills

The best way to begin teaching study skills by first determining how a student learns. Although there are several methods that will accomplish this step, the easiest is to find the student’s Myers-Briggs Type Indicator®. From that starting point, a variety of techniques can be crafted to assist the student in learning study skills, improving their acquisition of knowledge, which ultimately leads to better grades. I acquired the knowledge and skills to tutor students in study skills while working on my M.A. with a major in Developmental and Adult Education. I practiced the study skills that I was learning: I graduated with a 4.0 GPA when I received my Masters degree.
Writing,

Writing

I got my start in writing as an Awards Clerk while stationed in Vietnam. In preparation for the position, I perused the files to learn how to properly write the recommendations for the medals. During my tour there, I wrote over 100 recommendations for Silver Star, Distinguished Flying Cross, Air Medal with and without the “V” device (Valor), Bronze Star with and without the “V” device (Valor), Army Commendation Medal, and Purple Heart. After graduating with my BSEE from the University of Texas, I wrote over 80 papers covering various topics in the semiconductor manufacturing industry that were published in conference proceedings, technical journals, and trade magazines. I also wrote five books, and edited two books. I also self-published seven books that were shipped to over 20 countries. I wrote over 30 papers while seeking my M.A. at Texas State University (2008) with a major in Remedial and Adult Education. And finally, since 2010, I have published over 160 articles on veterans affairs for the online magazine, Examiner.
Reading, SAT Math

Test Preparation

ASVAB,

ASVAB

The ASVAB exam is quite challenging because it covers nine different topics. The minimum score to join one of five services of our military ranges from 31 to 40. My last student needed a minimum of 50 to get a particular field in the Air Force. After working with her, she took her exam and made a 64. What I have to offer is a series of six steps that will help the student succeed in doing well on this exam. These steps are not included in any study guide you can buy to help you prepare to take your ASVAB exam.
ACT Math, SAT Math, SSAT, TOEFL

Ratings and Reviews


Rating

4.9 (232 ratings)
5 star
(205)
4 star
(24)
3 star
(2)
2 star
(0)
1 star
(1)

Reviews


Effective!!

My son's grades and understanding of Algebra are way up. Chuck even has him one step ahead of his entire class by starting him on the next chapter whenever possible.

Kevin, 22 lessons with Chuck

Great ASVAB tutor

Very knowledgeable, very patient, and was able to help my son breakdown the troubled subjects into simplest form. Very thankful having help my son and I'm pretty sure with his help my son will be able to qualify into the Air Force. My son seems very confident in his studies.

Tom, 2 lessons with Chuck

Very Kind and helpful

Chuck is patient and very helpful. Both my children gave their thumbs up at the end of their sessions. They felt like they understood the material better, and seem to be more confident.

Christine, 20 lessons with Chuck

Very Patient, Great Teacher!

I've only had one session so far with Chuck Y. However, he is patient and makes sure you understand the material. I am looking forward to having him as my tutor and being able to get a high score in the ASVAB.

Jonathan, 1 lesson with Chuck

Patient and flexible tutor

I've had a few lessons with chuck, he's been very patient with me and very helpful. He takes his time with you and does not rush throughout the lesson. He has shown me multiple ways on how to do an equation. He does his best to help you understand problems and as well making sure you do understand it. I would highly recommend him.

Gracie, 8 lessons with Chuck

Patient and Encouraging

Chuck is patient and encourages students to ask questions. He explains things clearly. My son feels ready for his final exam next week.

Karen, 1 lesson with Chuck

Very patient and knowledgeable.

Chuck really helped our Sophomore grasp some Algebra II concepts that he needed to improve before an upcoming final. We look forward to meeting with Chuck again!

Tc, 1 lesson with Chuck

WOW! Chuck is awesome!

Chuck is accommodating and understands that life throws curveballs sometimes. He is patient, easy going and flexible. But the best part about Chuck is his ability to personalize tutoring and connect with students where they are -- at their confidence level, their anxiety level and their interest level. Chuck quickly analyzes the student's style, pace and personality. He connected with my daughter immediately and shared his story to connect with her. There is no doubt Chuck cares about the student's outcome and the role he plays in that. My daughter passed her ASVAB test with a score we hadn't dreamed of... we know Chuck had a big impact on that success and we appreciate his contribution to this life changing event for my daughter!

Colleen, 5 lessons with Chuck

Chuck is easy going , patient, and very knowledgeable.

Chuck is helping my son pass his electrical engineering final. He has worked through the concepts step by step until my son truly understands it. Even if it takes time, he is very patient and lets him think it out, gently encouraging and not pushy.

Jennifer , 17 lessons with Chuck

$40/hour

Chuck Y.

$40/hour

  • No subscriptions or upfront payments

  • Only pay for the time you need

  • Find the right fit, or your first hour is free

Contact Chuck

Response time: 2 hours