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Michael E.

College and High School Math for Classes and Test Prep

College and High School Math for Classes and Test Prep

$50/hour

  • 3,966 hours tutoring

  • Livonia, MI 48150

About Michael


Bio

From 2006 to 2010, I had taught mathematics, and since 2010 have been a full-time private tutor. I work with students on topics from Prealgebra to Calculus, whether specifically for a class, or as part of test preparation for an entrance exam. My degree is a Bachelor of Science in Mathematics from Wayne State University's College of Science, where I did a combined curriculum with the University's College of Education for my teacher certification.

Prior to becoming a teacher/tutor, I had...

From 2006 to 2010, I had taught mathematics, and since 2010 have been a full-time private tutor. I work with students on topics from Prealgebra to Calculus, whether specifically for a class, or as part of test preparation for an entrance exam. My degree is a Bachelor of Science in Mathematics from Wayne State University's College of Science, where I did a combined curriculum with the University's College of Education for my teacher certification.

Prior to becoming a teacher/tutor, I had done the programming, installation, and training of Point-of-Sale equipment, as well as accounting functions, such as Business Personal Property Taxes. Through these experiences, I can draw on practical applications for my tutoring, as well as the abilities to be flexible, adaptable, and most of all, patient!

Tutoring sessions take place at my office in Livonia, MI.

For online sessions, we can use either the Wyzant Whiteboard, or Skype.


Education

Wayne State University
Mathematics

Policies

  • Hourly rate: $50
  • Tutor’s lessons: In-person and online
  • Travel policy: Within 20 miles of Livonia, MI 48150
  • Lesson cancellation: 4 hours notice required
  • Background check passed on 11/2/2017

  • Your first lesson is backed by our Good Fit Guarantee

Schedule

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Subjects

Business

GMAT,

GMAT

Depending on the University/Program you are looking to enter, you may need to take the GMAT, or GRE. Preparation for the math portions of the GMAT and the GRE are very similar in topics: Pre-Algebra, Algebra, Geometry, Basic Probability, and Data Analysis. While a calculator is allowed on the GRE, it is a very basic one. For the GMAT, a calculator is allowed on the 'Integrated Reasoning' Section, but not the 'Quantitative' Section. So, while preparing for either test, you will want to practice mental and written calculations, and shortcuts for both. For the GMAT, hold off on doing the 'Data Sufficiency' questions. For the GRE, hold off on the 'Quantitative Comparison' questions. Be sure to have the basics, and the other question types down first.
GRE

GRE

Depending on the University/Program you are looking to enter, you may need to take the GMAT, or GRE. Preparation for the math portions of the GMAT and the GRE are very similar in topics: Pre-Algebra, Algebra, Geometry, Basic Probability, and Data Analysis. While a calculator is allowed on the GRE, it is a very basic one. For the GMAT, a calculator is allowed on the 'Integrated Reasoning' Section, but not the 'Quantitative' Section. So, while preparing for either test, you will want to practice mental and written calculations, and shortcuts for both. For the GMAT, hold off on doing the 'Data Sufficiency' questions. For the GRE, hold off on the 'Quantitative Comparison' questions. Be sure to have the basics, and the other question types down first.

Corporate Training

GMAT

GMAT

Depending on the University/Program you are looking to enter, you may need to take the GMAT, or GRE. Preparation for the math portions of the GMAT and the GRE are very similar in topics: Pre-Algebra, Algebra, Geometry, Basic Probability, and Data Analysis. While a calculator is allowed on the GRE, it is a very basic one. For the GMAT, a calculator is allowed on the 'Integrated Reasoning' Section, but not the 'Quantitative' Section. So, while preparing for either test, you will want to practice mental and written calculations, and shortcuts for both. For the GMAT, hold off on doing the 'Data Sufficiency' questions. For the GRE, hold off on the 'Quantitative Comparison' questions. Be sure to have the basics, and the other question types down first.

Homeschool

Algebra 1,

Algebra 1

Having trouble solving for 'x'? Not sure if you should be adding or subtracting from both sides of an equation, or multiplying or dividing on both sides? Do terms like 'radicals' or phrases like 'rational expressions' make you wonder if you are still talking about math? Please message me when ready to start tackling these items, or any others, which may be giving you trouble.
Algebra 2,

Algebra 2

College Level: Intermediate Algebra is equivalent Algebra 2. Many college students are taking this class online. Quite a few problems arise from just trying to figure out how to enter the answer into the online program. Whether due to this, or problems with the material directly, please message me, and we will get started. High School Level: Algebra 2 Algebra 2 is traditionally taken after Geometry, but can be taken beforehand. Check with your counselor beforehand before doing either, however. A large focus here is placed on parent graphs, how you can translate them, and how their corresponding equations would look. Factoring techniques are covered in depth, and quite often, a deeper look will be taken at Trigonometry, beyond SOHCAHTOA, to accommodate ACT test questions.
Calculus,

Calculus

Calc I: Take the formula for slope from your algebra and geometry classes, change the notation, and see what happens when the 'run' is taken to be infinitely small. This derivative will then be used for practical applications: minimizing outputs, maximizing outputs, related rates, etc... Anything from your Algebra I, Algebra II, and Geometry is fair game for working out a problem. A lot of time will be spent learning the rules for finding the derivative of a function by means of: Power Rule, Product Rule, Quotient rule, and Chain Rule. Be very comfortable using rational exponents rather than radical symbols, and keep a sheet of trig identities at hand. Calc II: Here is where you mainly learn about anti-derivatives and integrals. There will be a variety of techniques for finding the anti-derivative and integrating: Substitution, Partial Fractions, Integration By Parts, Tabular Integration, etc... Again, anything from previous math courses is fair game, and keep a sheet of trig identities handy. Typical applications are for finding the area and volume of an object.
Geometry,

Geometry

Most of a student's difficulty comes from writing proofs. Think of it as writing an argumentative paper, and having to cite your sources. With the 'Given' typically as your introduction, make your argument with any supporting definitions, postulates, and/or theorems available to you at that time, and end it with what you want to 'prove' as your conclusion. Your particular geometry text book is your source for citing, unless other material is given by your instructor. You can only cite references covered to date. No peeking ahead. Beyond proof writing, while it may be other geometric concepts causing issues, it is probably number concepts, algebra skills, and/or mental calculations that need to be worked on.
Prealgebra,

Prealgebra

Having trouble solving for 'x'? Not sure if you should be adding or subtracting from both sides of an equation, or multiplying or dividing on both sides? Do terms like 'radicals' or phrases like 'rational expressions' make you wonder if you are still talking about math? Please message me when ready to start tackling these items, or any others, which may be giving you trouble.
Precalculus,

Precalculus

A further look is taken at parent graphs, how they can be translated, and the domain and range of functions are more closely kept track of. Main things to look for when determining the domain of a function: division by zero, square rooting (or any even root) of a number. Anything learned in previous math classes is fair game at any point, and more time will be spent on special classes of functions, and identities: logarithmic, exponential, trigonometric, rational, etc... Become very comfortable using rational exponents rather than radical symbols, and do not rely too much on the calculator for calculations which should be done mentally.
SAT Math

SAT Math

The SAT Math covers topics from Pre-Algebra, Algebra, Geometry, and Trigonometry. If you are in Pre-Calc, you have most likely seen all the information before. While the test is certainly checking for content knowledge, it also checks for a certain level of ability to manipulate the material. This is one area where the SAT likes to do more of that the ACT. Starting with the 2016 testing, the Math portion now has a calculator and non-calculator portion. Though for a large part of the calculator portion, just about all questions can be done without, and usually with less effort or the same as typing into the calculator. Time should be set aside for practicing problems both ways. Unless the problem indicates in some manner that you will be rounding, all answers will be exactly one of the options. If you are even a little off, it is probably not the answer.

Math

ACT Math,

ACT Math

The ACT Math covers topics from Pre-Algebra, Algebra, Geometry, and Trigonometry. If you are in Pre-Calc, you have most likely seen all the information before. While the test is certainly checking for content knowledge, it also checks for a certain level of ability to manipulate the material. Though a calculator is allowed, all questions are designed to be done without, and usually with less effort or the same as typing into the calculator. Time should be set aside for practicing problems both ways. Unless the problem indicates in some manner that you will be rounding, all answers will be exactly one of the options. If you are even a little off, it is probably not the answer.
Algebra 1,

Algebra 1

Having trouble solving for 'x'? Not sure if you should be adding or subtracting from both sides of an equation, or multiplying or dividing on both sides? Do terms like 'radicals' or phrases like 'rational expressions' make you wonder if you are still talking about math? Please message me when ready to start tackling these items, or any others, which may be giving you trouble.
Algebra 2,

Algebra 2

College Level: Intermediate Algebra is equivalent Algebra 2. Many college students are taking this class online. Quite a few problems arise from just trying to figure out how to enter the answer into the online program. Whether due to this, or problems with the material directly, please message me, and we will get started. High School Level: Algebra 2 Algebra 2 is traditionally taken after Geometry, but can be taken beforehand. Check with your counselor beforehand before doing either, however. A large focus here is placed on parent graphs, how you can translate them, and how their corresponding equations would look. Factoring techniques are covered in depth, and quite often, a deeper look will be taken at Trigonometry, beyond SOHCAHTOA, to accommodate ACT test questions.
Calculus,

Calculus

Calc I: Take the formula for slope from your algebra and geometry classes, change the notation, and see what happens when the 'run' is taken to be infinitely small. This derivative will then be used for practical applications: minimizing outputs, maximizing outputs, related rates, etc... Anything from your Algebra I, Algebra II, and Geometry is fair game for working out a problem. A lot of time will be spent learning the rules for finding the derivative of a function by means of: Power Rule, Product Rule, Quotient rule, and Chain Rule. Be very comfortable using rational exponents rather than radical symbols, and keep a sheet of trig identities at hand. Calc II: Here is where you mainly learn about anti-derivatives and integrals. There will be a variety of techniques for finding the anti-derivative and integrating: Substitution, Partial Fractions, Integration By Parts, Tabular Integration, etc... Again, anything from previous math courses is fair game, and keep a sheet of trig identities handy. Typical applications are for finding the area and volume of an object.
Geometry,

Geometry

Most of a student's difficulty comes from writing proofs. Think of it as writing an argumentative paper, and having to cite your sources. With the 'Given' typically as your introduction, make your argument with any supporting definitions, postulates, and/or theorems available to you at that time, and end it with what you want to 'prove' as your conclusion. Your particular geometry text book is your source for citing, unless other material is given by your instructor. You can only cite references covered to date. No peeking ahead. Beyond proof writing, while it may be other geometric concepts causing issues, it is probably number concepts, algebra skills, and/or mental calculations that need to be worked on.
Prealgebra,

Prealgebra

Having trouble solving for 'x'? Not sure if you should be adding or subtracting from both sides of an equation, or multiplying or dividing on both sides? Do terms like 'radicals' or phrases like 'rational expressions' make you wonder if you are still talking about math? Please message me when ready to start tackling these items, or any others, which may be giving you trouble.
Precalculus,

Precalculus

A further look is taken at parent graphs, how they can be translated, and the domain and range of functions are more closely kept track of. Main things to look for when determining the domain of a function: division by zero, square rooting (or any even root) of a number. Anything learned in previous math classes is fair game at any point, and more time will be spent on special classes of functions, and identities: logarithmic, exponential, trigonometric, rational, etc... Become very comfortable using rational exponents rather than radical symbols, and do not rely too much on the calculator for calculations which should be done mentally.
SAT Math,

SAT Math

The SAT Math covers topics from Pre-Algebra, Algebra, Geometry, and Trigonometry. If you are in Pre-Calc, you have most likely seen all the information before. While the test is certainly checking for content knowledge, it also checks for a certain level of ability to manipulate the material. This is one area where the SAT likes to do more of that the ACT. Starting with the 2016 testing, the Math portion now has a calculator and non-calculator portion. Though for a large part of the calculator portion, just about all questions can be done without, and usually with less effort or the same as typing into the calculator. Time should be set aside for practicing problems both ways. Unless the problem indicates in some manner that you will be rounding, all answers will be exactly one of the options. If you are even a little off, it is probably not the answer.
Trigonometry

Trigonometry

Whether taking this as a class of its own, or as part of some other class, you will want to know your unit circle, and be able to prove various trig identities. Learn how to graph polar coordinates and use formulas like de Moivre's formula. The basics of Trigonometry tend to be taught in Geometry and/or Algebra II, but you will need it throughout Precalculus, and Calculus.

Most Popular

Algebra 1,

Algebra 1

Having trouble solving for 'x'? Not sure if you should be adding or subtracting from both sides of an equation, or multiplying or dividing on both sides? Do terms like 'radicals' or phrases like 'rational expressions' make you wonder if you are still talking about math? Please message me when ready to start tackling these items, or any others, which may be giving you trouble.
Algebra 2,

Algebra 2

College Level: Intermediate Algebra is equivalent Algebra 2. Many college students are taking this class online. Quite a few problems arise from just trying to figure out how to enter the answer into the online program. Whether due to this, or problems with the material directly, please message me, and we will get started. High School Level: Algebra 2 Algebra 2 is traditionally taken after Geometry, but can be taken beforehand. Check with your counselor beforehand before doing either, however. A large focus here is placed on parent graphs, how you can translate them, and how their corresponding equations would look. Factoring techniques are covered in depth, and quite often, a deeper look will be taken at Trigonometry, beyond SOHCAHTOA, to accommodate ACT test questions.
Calculus,

Calculus

Calc I: Take the formula for slope from your algebra and geometry classes, change the notation, and see what happens when the 'run' is taken to be infinitely small. This derivative will then be used for practical applications: minimizing outputs, maximizing outputs, related rates, etc... Anything from your Algebra I, Algebra II, and Geometry is fair game for working out a problem. A lot of time will be spent learning the rules for finding the derivative of a function by means of: Power Rule, Product Rule, Quotient rule, and Chain Rule. Be very comfortable using rational exponents rather than radical symbols, and keep a sheet of trig identities at hand. Calc II: Here is where you mainly learn about anti-derivatives and integrals. There will be a variety of techniques for finding the anti-derivative and integrating: Substitution, Partial Fractions, Integration By Parts, Tabular Integration, etc... Again, anything from previous math courses is fair game, and keep a sheet of trig identities handy. Typical applications are for finding the area and volume of an object.
Geometry,

Geometry

Most of a student's difficulty comes from writing proofs. Think of it as writing an argumentative paper, and having to cite your sources. With the 'Given' typically as your introduction, make your argument with any supporting definitions, postulates, and/or theorems available to you at that time, and end it with what you want to 'prove' as your conclusion. Your particular geometry text book is your source for citing, unless other material is given by your instructor. You can only cite references covered to date. No peeking ahead. Beyond proof writing, while it may be other geometric concepts causing issues, it is probably number concepts, algebra skills, and/or mental calculations that need to be worked on.
Prealgebra,

Prealgebra

Having trouble solving for 'x'? Not sure if you should be adding or subtracting from both sides of an equation, or multiplying or dividing on both sides? Do terms like 'radicals' or phrases like 'rational expressions' make you wonder if you are still talking about math? Please message me when ready to start tackling these items, or any others, which may be giving you trouble.
Precalculus

Precalculus

A further look is taken at parent graphs, how they can be translated, and the domain and range of functions are more closely kept track of. Main things to look for when determining the domain of a function: division by zero, square rooting (or any even root) of a number. Anything learned in previous math classes is fair game at any point, and more time will be spent on special classes of functions, and identities: logarithmic, exponential, trigonometric, rational, etc... Become very comfortable using rational exponents rather than radical symbols, and do not rely too much on the calculator for calculations which should be done mentally.

Summer

Algebra 1,

Algebra 1

Having trouble solving for 'x'? Not sure if you should be adding or subtracting from both sides of an equation, or multiplying or dividing on both sides? Do terms like 'radicals' or phrases like 'rational expressions' make you wonder if you are still talking about math? Please message me when ready to start tackling these items, or any others, which may be giving you trouble.
Algebra 2,

Algebra 2

College Level: Intermediate Algebra is equivalent Algebra 2. Many college students are taking this class online. Quite a few problems arise from just trying to figure out how to enter the answer into the online program. Whether due to this, or problems with the material directly, please message me, and we will get started. High School Level: Algebra 2 Algebra 2 is traditionally taken after Geometry, but can be taken beforehand. Check with your counselor beforehand before doing either, however. A large focus here is placed on parent graphs, how you can translate them, and how their corresponding equations would look. Factoring techniques are covered in depth, and quite often, a deeper look will be taken at Trigonometry, beyond SOHCAHTOA, to accommodate ACT test questions.
Calculus,

Calculus

Calc I: Take the formula for slope from your algebra and geometry classes, change the notation, and see what happens when the 'run' is taken to be infinitely small. This derivative will then be used for practical applications: minimizing outputs, maximizing outputs, related rates, etc... Anything from your Algebra I, Algebra II, and Geometry is fair game for working out a problem. A lot of time will be spent learning the rules for finding the derivative of a function by means of: Power Rule, Product Rule, Quotient rule, and Chain Rule. Be very comfortable using rational exponents rather than radical symbols, and keep a sheet of trig identities at hand. Calc II: Here is where you mainly learn about anti-derivatives and integrals. There will be a variety of techniques for finding the anti-derivative and integrating: Substitution, Partial Fractions, Integration By Parts, Tabular Integration, etc... Again, anything from previous math courses is fair game, and keep a sheet of trig identities handy. Typical applications are for finding the area and volume of an object.
GED,

GED

Having trouble solving for 'x'? Not sure if you should be adding or subtracting from both sides of an equation, or multiplying or dividing on both sides? Do terms like 'radicals' or phrases like 'rational expressions' make you wonder if you are still talking about math? Please message me when ready to start tackling these items, or any others, which may be giving you trouble.
Geometry,

Geometry

Most of a student's difficulty comes from writing proofs. Think of it as writing an argumentative paper, and having to cite your sources. With the 'Given' typically as your introduction, make your argument with any supporting definitions, postulates, and/or theorems available to you at that time, and end it with what you want to 'prove' as your conclusion. Your particular geometry text book is your source for citing, unless other material is given by your instructor. You can only cite references covered to date. No peeking ahead. Beyond proof writing, while it may be other geometric concepts causing issues, it is probably number concepts, algebra skills, and/or mental calculations that need to be worked on.
SAT Math

SAT Math

The SAT Math covers topics from Pre-Algebra, Algebra, Geometry, and Trigonometry. If you are in Pre-Calc, you have most likely seen all the information before. While the test is certainly checking for content knowledge, it also checks for a certain level of ability to manipulate the material. This is one area where the SAT likes to do more of that the ACT. Starting with the 2016 testing, the Math portion now has a calculator and non-calculator portion. Though for a large part of the calculator portion, just about all questions can be done without, and usually with less effort or the same as typing into the calculator. Time should be set aside for practicing problems both ways. Unless the problem indicates in some manner that you will be rounding, all answers will be exactly one of the options. If you are even a little off, it is probably not the answer.

Test Preparation

ACT Math,

ACT Math

The ACT Math covers topics from Pre-Algebra, Algebra, Geometry, and Trigonometry. If you are in Pre-Calc, you have most likely seen all the information before. While the test is certainly checking for content knowledge, it also checks for a certain level of ability to manipulate the material. Though a calculator is allowed, all questions are designed to be done without, and usually with less effort or the same as typing into the calculator. Time should be set aside for practicing problems both ways. Unless the problem indicates in some manner that you will be rounding, all answers will be exactly one of the options. If you are even a little off, it is probably not the answer.
ASVAB,

ASVAB

I have done tutoring for the ASVAB Math portions, which I would compare to the SAT, or the ACT without the Trigonometry, both of which I have also done tutoring. There are two math portions on this test: Arithmetic Reasoning and Mathematics Knowledge. The Arithmetic Reasoning portion contains word problems, while the Mathematics Knowledge portion contains algebra and geometry problems, which may or may not start off as a word problem. Currently, no calculator is allowed, so mental calculations, and tricks for simplifying are very useful.
GED,

GED

Having trouble solving for 'x'? Not sure if you should be adding or subtracting from both sides of an equation, or multiplying or dividing on both sides? Do terms like 'radicals' or phrases like 'rational expressions' make you wonder if you are still talking about math? Please message me when ready to start tackling these items, or any others, which may be giving you trouble.
GMAT,

GMAT

Depending on the University/Program you are looking to enter, you may need to take the GMAT, or GRE. Preparation for the math portions of the GMAT and the GRE are very similar in topics: Pre-Algebra, Algebra, Geometry, Basic Probability, and Data Analysis. While a calculator is allowed on the GRE, it is a very basic one. For the GMAT, a calculator is allowed on the 'Integrated Reasoning' Section, but not the 'Quantitative' Section. So, while preparing for either test, you will want to practice mental and written calculations, and shortcuts for both. For the GMAT, hold off on doing the 'Data Sufficiency' questions. For the GRE, hold off on the 'Quantitative Comparison' questions. Be sure to have the basics, and the other question types down first.
GRE,

GRE

Depending on the University/Program you are looking to enter, you may need to take the GMAT, or GRE. Preparation for the math portions of the GMAT and the GRE are very similar in topics: Pre-Algebra, Algebra, Geometry, Basic Probability, and Data Analysis. While a calculator is allowed on the GRE, it is a very basic one. For the GMAT, a calculator is allowed on the 'Integrated Reasoning' Section, but not the 'Quantitative' Section. So, while preparing for either test, you will want to practice mental and written calculations, and shortcuts for both. For the GMAT, hold off on doing the 'Data Sufficiency' questions. For the GRE, hold off on the 'Quantitative Comparison' questions. Be sure to have the basics, and the other question types down first.
SAT Math

SAT Math

The SAT Math covers topics from Pre-Algebra, Algebra, Geometry, and Trigonometry. If you are in Pre-Calc, you have most likely seen all the information before. While the test is certainly checking for content knowledge, it also checks for a certain level of ability to manipulate the material. This is one area where the SAT likes to do more of that the ACT. Starting with the 2016 testing, the Math portion now has a calculator and non-calculator portion. Though for a large part of the calculator portion, just about all questions can be done without, and usually with less effort or the same as typing into the calculator. Time should be set aside for practicing problems both ways. Unless the problem indicates in some manner that you will be rounding, all answers will be exactly one of the options. If you are even a little off, it is probably not the answer.

Resources

Michael has shared 69 answers and 1 file on Wyzant Resources.

Go to Michael’s resources

Ratings and Reviews


Rating

4.9 (776 ratings)
5 star
(719)
4 star
(50)
3 star
(7)
2 star
(0)
1 star
(0)

Reviews


Great tutor

Michael is a very knowledgeable and patient tutor. He has helped my daughter immensely with her Algebra skills. She has gained confidence in her math skills and is much better at showing her work to get to the correct answer.

Amy, 6 lessons with Michael

Always Great

Michael is a great tutor. He is always timely and attentive. Math is not my daughter's favorite subject and he explains things in a way that she understands.

Dylan, 5 lessons with Michael

Very knowledgeable helpful tutor.

Michael help my son to prepare for some exams, quizzes and SAT's. HE is super knowledgeable and helpful. He was able to hone in on what my son needed and he preformed well on his examinations. We will continue to work with Michael for sure!

Kathleen, 8 lessons with Michael

Genius.

Mike tutored for me for Calculus II and I passed with an A. Every question I asked him, he knew the history and proofs of the problem. Now I'm beyond Calculus II and I'm in topics Mike hasn't dabbled with in a long time like discrete mathematics. For example: I'm taking Linear Algebra now and Mike hasn't practiced in a long time. Mike reminded himself all the topics the day before and helped me master the material. He's passionate about math and his passion made him brilliant.

Al, 15 lessons with Michael

Michael on the spot

I woke up knowing my son was having trouble with his algebra the previous night, and the way they're teaching math today is like a foreign language to me. I got up and checked around and found Michael available in like 15 minutes at 6 am Pacific time. He went over the assignment with my son, and it was like light bulbs flickering for the next hour out of my son's brain. He had a great morning, because he felt like he finally understood all of the material he was trying to figure out the previous night. Thanks, Michael!

Gabriel, 1 lesson with Michael

My son is going back

Michael is working with my son on SAT math prep as well as Algebra II and Trig. He has only had one session so far, but the big win is that he is going back, willingly. A first for my son.

Karen, 2 lessons with Michael

Great, patient, and excellent tutor!

I️ been to Michael twice and both times he has been very patient when explaining any math problems. Michael explains problems step by step and if I️ am not clear on something he would review again. Math is very challenging to me but I️ have a better understanding after each session with Michael. I️ would definitely recommend him to anyone having challenges in math and need one on one help.

Stacie, 2 lessons with Michael

A great help!

Michael was a great help in the nick of time! Our daughter had a test the week that Michael helped her. She wasn’t prepared for the test and Michael helped to break down the concepts so she was able to set up and solve the calculus problems. We are grateful for his help and patience in teaching the calculus related rates to our daughter. We will be using him again!

Diana, 5 lessons with Michael

Excellent tutor!

My son is a bit rusty as he took Pre-Calculus a couple of years ago and now taking Calculus. He says he has learned more from Michael than from his teacher or others in just a few hours of tutoring. Thanks, Michael!

Susan, 3 lessons with Michael
Contact Michael

Response time: 2 hours

$50/hour

Michael E.

$50/hour

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  • Only pay for the time you need

  • Find the right fit, or your first hour is free

Contact Michael

Response time: 2 hours