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Kyle M.'s Resources

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Permutations (answer)

These two are the same except for one thing: in permutations (a), order matters. With combinations (b), the order of objects does not matter. For example, we choose 3 candies from a bag of 5 candies. Whether we get a caramel, a chocolate, then a mint, or a mint, a caramel, then a chocolate, it makes...

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Yours is quite an open-ended question, which could require much time & space to answer completely. However, in brief, we could address a few overarching issues & avoid getting caught up in voluminous detail. I recommend that you follow up with some reading, whether in books or on the internet...

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Jim, I suspect that you may have written the choices here inaccurately. Allow me to explain my reasoning, while also showing you how to eliminate incorrect responses.   A. "Abolish the 14th Amendment..." cannot be the correct choice because states had to do quite the opposite...

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Hello, Alicia! Maximizing profit usually assumes that we utilize resources most efficiently - as wasted resources cost money & earn us no profit. According to this problem, we can make some combination of "all beef hot dogs" & regular hot dogs that are half beef & half pork...

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find the answers (answer)

That's a tricky question, so read carefully. You said "200 preschool children living in poverty are selected...", then you said "what about not living in poverty." That's two separate samples of 200 preschool students - 200 in poverty & 200 not in poverty.   I...

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Hi, Bob! Be sure to review your types of sampling designs & think about how unlikely it would be to get exactly 50 student responses from each college class using simple random sampling. Simple random sampling uses a numbered list, and randomly generated numbers are used to choose subjects from...

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Word problems require you to find the question & convert it into math symbols. Many students have difficulty with this, so don't feel bad about it. All it takes is some logical thinking, some discernment, a little stubbornness or cleverness, and plenty of practice. You can definitely improve...

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Using elimination, we'll cancel out either x or y - whichever one is convenient - and leave the other one to resolve. Notice that there's a +9y in one equation & -9y in the other? We'll take advantage of that by adding the equations together: 6x +9y = 45 4x -9y = -75 ======== 10x...

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Taylor's salary was multiplied by the Medicare percentage factor in order to find her deduction. We'll turn that operation backward to find her salary, but first convert 1.45% to a decimal by moving the decimal point 2 places to the left: 1.45%=0.0145 Next, divide her Medicare deduction...

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1/4and1/2 LCD= (answer)

Hi, Wathik! When manipulating fractions into forms in which we can add & subtract, we must be able to find common denominators. I assume you realize that the bottom number of the fraction is the denominator. We must be able to make equivalent fractions out of any fraction, so that we are not...

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Hi, Cynthia! You might have done this correctly - maybe you should have more trust in your instincts - but let's go through it together.   Consiser the facts before us: 1. The initial cost estimate was $101 million. I believe we are expected to assume this was the amount budgeted...

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I'm afraid I might not fully understand your question - which is to say I'm not certain what you are asking. Nonetheless, I will try to make my best speculation. If six friends enter college at the same time, one or more of them could graduate - though there is a 50% (0.5) probability that any...

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Following the pattern I tried to describe in your previous question, start with your mean of 100 & mark 3 increments of 10 both below & above 100. The most common cases will fall right around 100 - from 90 to 110. The 2nd SD will include 80-89 & 111-120. The 3rd SD (called outliers)...

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This distribution could have few samples or many samples, but the average - or mean - result is 10. The standard deviation of 3 tells us that a little more than 2/3 of all samples fall within +/-3 of that mean, so most results are from 7 to 13 (10-3 & 10+3). We call this the 1st standard...

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