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In some works of literature, a character who appears briefly, or does not appear at all, is a significant presence. Choose a novel or play of literary merit and write an essay in which you show how such a character functions in the work. You may wish to discuss how the character affects action, theme, or the development of other characters. Avoid plot summary. ~AP Literature Open Essay... read more

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Since Banned Books Week happens in mid-September each year, I'd like to talk today about the problem with banning books. Last year, my Bring Your Own Book club's topic for September was to read a banned or challenged book. We had a great discussion during our meeting about common threads in all of the books we read, common reasons why books get challenged, and how that relates to the education... read more

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AP Literature Open-Ended Prompt, 1975, #2: Unlike the novelist, the writer of a play does not use his own voice and only rarely uses a narrator’s voice to guide the audience’s responses to character and action. Select a play you have read and write an essay in which you explain the techniques the playwright uses to guide his audience’s responses to the central characters and the action... read more

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Last week in my Literature Spotlight, I discussed the idea of science-fiction as a reflection of the time period in which it was written. For this week's Writing Rundown, let's take a look at my brainstorming process. As I mentioned in this blog post, there are many ways to brainstorm for a project. For this one, I decided to use a technique I hardly ever use myself: free-writing.... read more

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Prompt: Explain the popularity of Science Fiction. Use at least one work from this genre to explain its appeal. Science fiction is one of my favorite genres. I love it (and I suspect many of its readers love it) because despite its trappings of the future, good science fiction is very much a reflection of the time period in which it is written. One of Sci-Fi's major draws for me... read more

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At a conference in town earlier this year, I presented several panel discussions centering around the difficulty of defining and quantifying art. Our discussions in these panels got me thinking about literature, and how one of my main points could apply equally easily to much of the literature that students read in high school. The point in question is this: one of the defining characteristics... read more

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I'm a huge fan of the novel structure known as epistolary, where the story is told through primary sources such as diaries, newspaper articles, or letters back and forth between characters. Bram Stoker's Dracula is one of my favorite examples of epistolary, as the mystery is heightened by Stoker's clever choices of whose diary to show at which point in the story. Epistolary form allows the author... read more

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“It is as inhuman to be totally good as it is to be totally evil.” ~(Author's Introduction to A Clockwork Orange, P. xiii) The protagonist of A Clockwork Orange, by Anthony Burgess, is a depraved young teen named Alex who has a love for 'ultra-violence.' For the first third of the book, Alex gleefully commits felony after felony, robbing, raping, and beating up random innocents... read more

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At BYOBook Club last month, we were discussing possible topics for the final meeting of the year. Someone suggested “The best book you've read all year,” which seemed to be well-received in the moment as an option. Since I'm participating in the Reading Challenge this year, I set myself the goal in January to read 50 books over the course of the year. (Right now I'm on book 45, so I'm right on... read more

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F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby presents the dark side of the American Dream and does so with unusual panache. The shimmering surface of Fitzgerald's prose style mirrors the daylight optimism of the dream, reflecting the ideal of a society wherein talent and hard work routinely get rewarded and upward mobility is based at least as much on merit as on luck or charm or who you know. But not... read more

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Hello! I come from Spain and I am a Writer and worked as a Journalist for a variety of Media back in Spain. I also had over 10 years of Teaching experience now and then, because I love it. The most important think to start speaking a language is just trying conversation! What better way to speak it to a Spanish native? I am very good in conversation.  It is much more fun than the traditional... read more

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For this week's Ellen's Choice, it's time to run down another month of Reading Challenge books!  Once again, it's a long one, so skim through for the titles in bold if you just want to see what I've read. Book 11: “Red Seas Under Red Skies” by Scott Lynch “a book with a color in the title” Wow - Locke Lamora is at it again! Consider me officially hooked on this series... read more

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I recently read a new-ish novel by one of my favorite authors, the incomparable Terry Pratchett, that provided me with some much-needed food for thought. The Long Earth, a collaboration between Pratchett and Stephen Baxter, centers around the invention and distribution of a simple contraption enabling its user to 'step' between an infinite number of parallel dimensions. Each of these dimensions... read more

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Book 3: "A Play"   I threw this little beauty in my backpack a few months ago for a long day out teaching lessons. I've had Arthur Miller's "Death of a Salesman" on my shelf for a while, but I'd never actually read it cover to cover. I love reading plays, so if I can swing it there might be a few more of them in this year's challenge, but this one fulfills the... read more

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