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I have been on WA now for several months (granted, through the summer months to start with), and although there were plenty of jobs that I would have accepted, I applied to several, and no one takes me up.  It is for any age Science, math, chemistry, physics, and I will also help with composition, English, etc  I get no one.  I double checked what makes a good job application, etc.  I double checked my profile. So is my price too high?  WA has not suggested nor given any guidance on any of these things, so I am asking you all. Thank you.

I was just contact by someone in a city near me (25 miles) who would like just some phone conversation/tutoring for her French exchange student.  I told her that I would adjust the rate($15/hour) since all she is asking for is some pick-me up conversation in her native tongue, and a little help learning the American English. Would anyone else have some ideas for me about rate for phone conversational English/French? 

Our understanding of the relationship between memory and learning continues to improve. Why not benefit from the latest research by incorporating some of these findings into your own study habits? I help my students come up with creative ways to do this all the time, and wanted to share one of the more helpful summaries I've come across about what works and what doesn't.    Here are a few highlights: Link new information to things you already know Actively participate in your own learning Create both a visual and a verbal memory for the same information Whenever possible, study in an environment that is similar to the testing environment Spread studying out over several days, rather than cramming Avoid multitasking when learning difficult or dense material Review information you're trying to memorize right before you go to sleep Quiz yourself frequently to practice retrieving these memories, making them stronger in the process   You... read more

I'm seeing more and more requests for assistance with writing. In my tutoring experience, students often need help developing key messages. What would you like a reader to know, learn, or remember? What are the main points to support your point of view, whether the message is informational or persuasive?   Another consideration for effective communication should always be the audience. What does the audience (or teacher) expect to gain from reading your paper, for instance?   Before you start writing, I recommend that you step back and look at the writing assignment (and requirements) carefully before proceeding. This will save you time and enhance your chances of providing a deliverable that is spot-on!    

Way back in 2010, one of my first blog post series on this site took the form of a five-part series on rules for effective time management.  For the next few Ellen's Choices, I've decided to go back through these rules and apply them to the world of preparing for the SAT (or any standardized test). So let's begin with Part 1: All-Nighters Are Evil Ellen’s Rules for Effective Time Management 1. Never pull an all-nighter. 2. NEVER pull an all-nighter! Seriously! I mean it. All-nighters are downright useless. Besides the fact that this concept breaks almost all of my other rules for effective time management in one go, all-nighters cause fatigue, stress you out, and just end up producing sub-par work. You can’t write well when you’re tired, and staying up all night studying just means you’ll be yawning all the way through the test the next day. If you haven’t learned the information on the test by the night before, you’re not going to learn... read more

I mentioned this problem from one of my earliest blog posts with one of my students last week, so I thought I'd bring it back as this week's Math Journey.  Enjoy!   ~   The SAT messes with your head. Don't feel embarrassed, it messes with everyone's head. It's designed to. The SAT is a test of your critical reasoning skills, meaning it's actually far more about logic and figuring out the correct course of action than it is about actually knowing the material. This is nowhere more evident than on the Math section. The SAT Math trips up so many students because they expect it to behave like a math test. The truth is, the SAT Math is about figuring out how to answer each problem using as little actual math as possible. It's all about working quickly, and the questions are structured such that they conceal the quick logic and context-based route behind the facade of a more complicated math question. They're trying to psych you out; to make you... read more

Michelle (not her real name, of course) is a bright, energetic 5th-grader. She is super-smart (and wants to be an astronaut when she grows up), but unfortunately she has a perception disorder that makes her jumble up letters and words when she reads or writes. (Special glasses help). She was doing very badly in math (especially word problems, as you can imagine), and her parents were in despair. It took several sessions and a lot of discussion with her mom to understand where she was having trouble and come up with ways to help her work-around those challenges. One thing I discovered right away was that she did not know her multiplication tables! (I can’t tell you the number of students I have taught, even in high school, who do not have a good handle on their multiplication tables...) Here she was facing division problems, fractions, and factoring, and she did not have the basic tools needed to handle those. So the first thing we did was made her some multiplication... read more

To my fellow educators and students,   I know that it is very tempting to give your students answers to their questions immediately, but sometimes it's best to let a student struggle a little. Asking students why they are doing what they are doing can help students to make lasting connections that go beyond that next test or ACT exam. This approach can be frustrating for both teachers and students at times, but it is quite rewarding.   I have a student who was completely scared about sharing their opinion on an answer they gave. Throughout most of the lesson i refused to give them a yea or nay answer. I asked them to talk it out and see if they could understand why they did what they did. The student was correct, but having students explain their answer and even get frustrated with me some helped this student achieve deeper understanding of the material. 

I started my Physics course this Summer telling my students they are not allowed to say "I don't know," unless they can't read, listen to a recording, watch a video, or ask a question of someone more knowledgeable. When I was in school we did not have access to information like students do today.  In my humble opinion, students need to bulk up on two things like body builders do using supplements. What are those two things students need to bulk up with? Asking quality questions and learning how they learn.  Take for example, Google is an awesome resource, but if you ask the wrong question or use terms inappropriately, you will not get the answer you seek. Ask a bad question one gets a bad answer. Ask a wrong question one gets a wrong answer. Ask an incomplete question one may very well get an incomplete answer. Its that simple. Quality of questions is paramount and good questions come from meticulous vocabulary management. Therefore, students must become... read more

One question I just received on a different blog was how to handle the 4-star ratings that come up. No matter how good you are, someone will not be satisfied. I personally have received two 4-stars here on WyzAnt, one when I was just starting out, and one just today. For the 4-star early on, it was from a weekly student who only rated the very first meeting as a 4-star. When I learned it was him (either WyzAnt didn't let us see ratings back when I began or I just hadn't figured out how), I approached him about it at the end of our next meeting. One thing I've learned in life is to ask questions instead, so I simply inquired as to why the first lesson was a 4-star to him. He thought back and couldn't really remember why; the session had gone well to him, and he couldn't remember anything in particular that went wrong; he simply thought that 4-stars was still "good". When I explained to him that it wasn't really how things worked on WyzAnt, how only 5-stars is "good"... read more

  Critical reading can feel like a pretty nebulous topic, but there are specific skills that can be practiced to improve your understanding. One of the most basic skills is simply paraphrasing as you read through a passage. I did say "simply", but I realize that this does not always feel so simple. Still, with practice, paraphrasing can (and should) become second nature.   As you read through a passage, practice frequently rephrasing what you have read. Paraphrase every few sentences or even more often if the passage is particularly difficult. While you might imagine that this process will slow you down, in practice it can save you time. It is certainly faster than reaching the question section and realizing that you don't understand what you just read. Rereading the entire passage can make it difficult to finish the section in the given time.    Paraphrasing is not summarizing; paraphrasing is instead a way of clarifying what you just read... read more

No-Shows/Cancellations: 1) If the student gives between 1 and 3 hours notice of cancellation before the lesson, I reserve the right to charge 50% my rate for the lesson length. 2) If the student gives less than 1 hour notice of cancellation, I reserve the right to charge for the entire lesson at the full rate. 3) If I, the tutor, miss a lesson without more than 1 hours notice of cancellation, the student reserves the right to request the next lesson of equivalent length for no fee. Tardies: 1) If a student is more than 15 minutes late, I will charge for the length of the actual lesson plus a 50% rate for every minute late to the nearest 5 minute mark.  Exceptions will be made for students who provide reasonable advanced notice of tardiness (determined at my discretion). 2) If I, the tutor, am more than 15 minutes late without reasonable prior notice, the student reserves the right to request 50% rate for the length of the lesson.

1. There are no wrong answers, judgement is OUT the window in my class.   It is only wrong if you do not participate in the discussion because anything "we" say is all of value.   2. Multiple avenues are used to give the best tutoring experience possible-and humor!   3. Make every lesson different, yet challenging   4. Understand what way your student(s) learn best. Use the tools they are comfy with, and the tutor needs to adapt.   5. The best tutors are students as well as educators. They have a thirst for knowledge and are willing to learn together with the student, not lecture the student. Good tutors positively engage and do not criticize in any form.   ♠♣♥♥♥♥ß¾ƒ∑©™®-Study, learn, and have fun while doing it!

The complaints against WyzAnt’s 40% commission demands a response. Suppose a tutor with 15 hours of work time through WyzAnt charges $40 an hour. Of that amount, WyzAnt will automatically deduct $16. This deduction is based on WyzAnt’s commission rate, which is 40% for the first 20 hours of work time. So the tutor is not earning $40 an hour; rather, the tutor is earning $24 an hour. According to a number of individuals, WyzAnt’s 40% commission rate is too high, way above average. Some folks, oddly enough, have even posted complaints on other websites. Why? Here's some food for thought. 1. Twenty-four dollars an hour is higher than any state’s hourly minimum wage. 2. You can create your website for tutors and charge a lower commission. 3. If you tutor for an hour you will be paid $24. 4. If you don’t tutor for an hour you will not be paid $24. 5. Twenty-four dollars is more than zero dollars. 6. You don’t have to stay with WyzAnt, but before you leave... read more

While creating engagements on social media, I came across a Copywriting book that I think is pretty good, especially being that the author-- Adventure Communications --encourages people to share the book with anyone free or charge. Now, if you are an SEO or Digital Marketer, you must be asking yourself, "What does copywriting have anything to do with Marketing?" One of the most important skills for any Digital Marketer to have is copywriting skills, which is a type of writing that aids in conveying a persuasive or effective Ad message through online media and print materials. Copywriting is primarily used for the purpose of advertising or marketing. This type of written material is often used to persuade a person or group as well as to raise brand awareness. In fact, some of the most successful SEO and Digital Marketers you see on Conferences and/or publications like MOZ, Search Engine Land, State of digital, TechCrunch, Forbes tech and the like;... read more

The Psychological Difference Between Repeat Purchase & Brand Loyalty Posted on May 19, 2016 By MaryPosted in Media Buy, Social Media, Technical SEO, Technical SEO Explaining the psychological difference between repeat purchase and brand loyalty. When consumers become committed to a brand and make repeat purchases over time, they are brand Loyalty customers. This phenomenon is a result of consumer behavior and is affected by a person’s preferences. Loyal customers will consistently purchase products from their preferred brands, regardless of convenience or price. A great example of the sociological reasons why people will go to great lengths to purchase a brand is Apple computer and its Mac products. In this case, the brand becomes a prestige product, in that it makes the one who owns it feel good. Some people think Apple really over-prices their products, yet because the psychological and emotional value attached to it, price doesn’t matter. Consumers... read more

Last week in my Literature Spotlight, I discussed the idea of science-fiction as a reflection of the time period in which it was written. For this week's Writing Rundown, let's take a look at my brainstorming process. As I mentioned in this blog post, there are many ways to brainstorm for a project. For this one, I decided to use a technique I hardly ever use myself: free-writing. Free-writing is a great tool for projects for which you have the beginnings of a lot of ideas bouncing around in your head, but none are quite fleshed out enough for you to contemplate their connections. It generally requires another form of prewriting such as a word cloud or outline to get it into a state that helps you write the essay, but it's a great place to start. So, as a brief recap: in freewriting, sometimes called “stream-of-consciousness” writing, you put your pen down on a blank piece of paper and just start writing – and you don't stop writing for at least ten or fifteen... read more

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