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These days, high schools tend to defer to parents. If there's a family event, kids are pulled from school. If Bobby gets a bad grade, Mom launches herself into the teacher's office to give her a piece of her mind! Parents track their kids through the day, texting and calling multiple times.   College is different and not just because your kids are away from home, perhaps for the first time. It's different because your kids are expect to behave like adults. That means reading the syllabus, showing up for their classes, not making excuses for work not done, staying clean (yes, clean!) and sober (absolutely sober!) and taking real responsibility for their behavior and work.   Parents need to be aware that the "helicopter parenting" they have done for years not only isn't welcome by colleges, but most often is not welcome either by their kids. Besides being a time of academic preparation, the high school years need to a time when parents start to let... read more

I recently came across this article from the Chronicle of Higher Education, urging college professors to fight grade inflation in the Humanities. As a college-level Instructional Assistant, I see this all the time. Students feel that their grade in their Anthropology course should reflect only effort and completion, not the content and understanding. This a trend that is not seen in the STEM fields as readily. As a result, professors are pressured to do just that; grade distribution in nearly all humanities classrooms do not follow a standardized bell curve as they might in a science or math classroom.    This sort of behavior not only devalues the importance of the humanities in our society, but also puts our students at a disadvantage. The humanities (Reading, Writing, and the Social Sciences) not only teaches us valuable lessons about communication, and how to connect with other human beings, but allows as a venue to contextualize the STEM fields as they relate... read more

As I think about how my own passion for my practice became an art form, I also begin to explore what I consider to be my mastery, as posed by this question by WyzAnt: How did you master a subject or concept that challenged you in school?   I then thought about why I like art. I believe art is limitless because it is freeing, it allows us not to think in binaries but to put it in a large grey scale. It allows us to put into perspective something that we have discovered to be a passion or interest greater than what we have known it to be before provoking it.   I went into school believing that I found what I was interested couldn't be found in it. It's true. I discovered I loved poetry. I loved conceptual writing, which is a little like weird internet poetry but more directed towards looking at writing as an art. In other words, writing that in itself can indicate a relation with something else outside of it. For example, the font, weight, colors... read more

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