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One of the leading questions parents ask when inquring about tutoring services is "how long should my student study for the SATs?"  This answer varies depending upon the student's current academic progress, whether they've taken the test previously and what areas they need to invest more time in.  The short answer is at least 40 hours.  Also, it is not a bad idea to take the test more than once to improve your score and become more familiar with the time structure and layout of the test. Retaking the test is not a sign of failure or falling short of your goals, it is simply a benefit toward improving yourself for your future academic ambitions. Not many opportunities present themselves more than once, so take advantage of improving your academic health and increasing your chances of getting accepted to the college of your choice.  If you need study tips or a SAT workshop program please feel free to reach out to me to schedule a session...

One of the biggest successes you can endeavor during your tutoring career is expanding your academic reach. Two years ago my student asked me to help her begin preparing for the PSATs. I have never taught that material but she enjoyed my English and reading approach that she was confident I could help her. After reviewing the materials, we began to take apart the test and work through the English sections. Over time I became comfortable and I started to spend time at home studying to increase my knowledge. Fast forward to two years later I am now teaching tips, tricks and strategies for conquering the SATs. This has opened the door for more opportunities that I would have never had if I didn't take the initial plunge into unfamilar water. You can also take that plunge I believe in you.  One of the best ways to approach tutoring the SATs is not just arriving at the answer but teaching strategies to ace the test and avoid tricks. Boosting a student's confidence is also key.... read more

This is the story of a certain student who faced a lot of difficulties understanding certain concepts in his class. He/She was at the point of giving up and failing that class when a deep beautiful voice called his/her name out loud, "Student!" He/She didn't understand what was going on. The voice called a second time, "Student, go to the tutoring center!" So the student walked his/her way to the student center and asked for a tutor to help.   The first tutor looked at him/her with an expression of disgust. "How can you not understand this?" the tutor asked. "It is very simple, just do this..." Confused, the student couldn't keep up with the tutor's technique. The tutor seemed to have had a bad beginning of the day and was very impatient. He also got on the top of his nerves, but always seemed to hold back. Scared, the student called onto a second tutor.   The second tutor came with an indifferent expression. He didn't... read more

It is important that students can relate to the lesson in order to fully understand what they are learning. My 5 outside of the box tips are:   1. Use real world examples 2. Incorporate music or other personal interests 3. Have the student teach the lesson (after learning the lesson) 4. Teach or tutor outside of the textbook 5. Create exit slips (3-2-1 strategy: students must write 3 things they learned, 2 things they found interesting, and 1 question they still have before ending a session)

I absolutely love tutoring. From a few years of experience I have gained some knowledge on how to make tutoring a fun experience and not make students feel like they are attending a second school.  One of my main tips is to let the students set the atmosphere. They need to be comfortable in whatever environment to facilitate learning. If music helps them concentrate, or some kind of background noise, then encourage it. If they want to sit on the couch instead of the chairs, so be it. The student should be able to chose the medium in which they study so as not to feel constrained like a classroom setting.  Another tip that I like to give is to level. If you know that your student isn't going to understand something the way an Ivy League student would, don't use ridiculous words and techniques. The whole point of tutoring is to help someone understand a concept, not to show off how smart you are. Subjects should never just be limited to the material either. Ask... read more

Online tutoring is definitely a great thing not only to take, but to teach. It allows you to be flexible with your schedule, you don't have to leave your home, and you save money on gas! However, there can be some downsides to online tutoring.  If you live with family, there can be distractions and background noise You may not be technologically savvy You may find some students would prefer tutoring in a face-to-face setting Even despite these setbacks, WyzAnt's online tutoring platform is an amazing way to interact with students. Here are some solutions to these issues: Make sure you have a designated "tutoring room" or quiet time during tutoring hours. Living with family, especially children, can be difficult. However, letting others know that you need silence, or having a designated room where there is little to no family traffic can help improve the quality of the session. Even if you are not technologically savvy, WyzAnt offers a... read more

As a parent or even a tutor looking to get the best and be the best of the best I often ask, "What makes my tutoring so special?" As tutors, I believe we all strive to take tutoring to another level so I decided to share what I do. I do not merely teach students in a specific subject, instead I help students to become independent thinkers. Over time I equip students with the resources to develop enough critical thinking skills so that I simply become an advisor or academic coach, helping to guide my students in their academic quest. Therefore I believe a tutor is a coach whose goal is motivate students to become independent thinkers and effective math problem solvers. My Tutoring Process My strong education background and Christian values has influenced my tutoring process. My tutoring sessions employ the use of research based strategies to help students to understand the standards they are required to master for their grade level... read more

So you want to learn the Arabic Language? Take it from an experienced Arabic Teacher & Native speaker of the language!   Be careful to NOT learn the "dialect" version of this language. Here is why you need to focus on learning the proper Arabic that is recognized by the U.N and 99% of the Arab League:   MSA (Modern Standard Arabic) is the standardized and literary variety of Arabic used in writing, and in most formal speech. i.e. as seen in Arabic newspapers, TV Anchors, Radio, Magazines, etc. ? Modern Standard Arabic is the literary standard across the Middle East, North Africa, Horn of Africa and one of the official six languages of the United Nations. o Most printed matter in the Arab League—including most books, newspapers, magazines, official documents, and reading primers for small children—is written in MSA. "Colloquial" Arabic refers to the many regional dialects and varieties derived from Arabic... read more

Understanding your child's / student(s)' learning styles is one of the most important factors in helping them reach success.  At the end of the day, why else did we become parents or teachers but to watch the next generation learn?  The problem is that we often assume that everyone learns and processes information the same as we do.  If they don't, does that mean there is something wrong with THEM?!  Absolutely not!! Respecting and building on the natural learning style of the learner, in my opinion, is the most important role of the tutor.   In my day, everything was pretty much done by taking turns reading aloud.   The problem for me was that I was not good at processing information while reading aloud nor was I savvy at auditory processing.  For several years I was treated as though something was wrong with me and given that I had an older sister who processed information "normally," I internalized that message for a very... read more

The five tips for tutoring "Outside the Box" would be:   1. Before you begin tutoring the specified subject, asses the students learning style as well as how they feel about the subject. I find that most students create mental blocks towards subjects they have a bad relationship with. This makes it nearly impossible for them to learn new information on that subject.   2. Award students for what they do know. When students feel they understand a concept, they are more willing to learn new concepts.   3. Have them "reteach" you. After a student understands a concept, switch roles. Allow the student to "tutor" you. It is only when they are able to teach, that you know they have truly mastered that concept.   4. Real life application. Make concepts more concrete by relating the concept to real life applications. When students can connect what they learn to something they do daily, that information is able... read more

The cliffnotes version of my take on the question "What are your 5 outside the box tips that help make your tutoring lessons fun?"   1.        Let the Student Set The Atmosphere for Learning 2.       Embody positivity in Personal Instruction of the Subject Matter!  3.       Acknowledge the emotions associated with previous failures and setbacks 4.       Take breaks with the Student during the session 5.       PERSONALIZED EXAMPLES!!!! CUSTOMIZED EXAMPLES!!!!! SILLY EXAMPLES!!!!     1. Let the Student Set The Atmosphere for Learning - As a tutor, I have the ability of customizing and personalizing the instruction of the subject matter to the needs of the student. However, we do not have the ability to read the mind... read more

Give as much information and be as detailed as possible about what you need help with. By supplying this specific information tutors are better equipped to immediately evaluate how their particular area of expertise matches with your particular area of need. Once you do pick a tutor they can immediately begin addressing the issues from the very first lesson. The subject and grade level often do not do enough to shed light on the specific problem areas.   For example if you need help with reading say a bit more about where the problem lies. Is it a phonics problem, is it a comprehension problem, is it a vocabulary problem, it may even be a motivation problem. Simply ask yourself this question: 'What is preventing (student) from doing well in (subject)?' Then include your answer in your post for tutor help. It’s a bit more work up front for you but is worth the time to get the right fit.

Firstly, tutoring is an art. I try my best to make each lesson unique. My number one tip is try to find a way to explain material through everyday phenomena. For example, in chemistry we use stoichiometry to find the right amounts of substance need for producing a certain amount of products. Before of jumping into the mathematical madness, I explain the concept through cooking. Chemical equations can be treated just like recipes. Students are more likely to understand the concept through things that they are familiar with.      My second tip is to take difficult things and make them into something silly or funny. I use this when I am explaining dimensional analysis. Many students struggle with unit conversions and unit simplification. What I do is I put the joules, kilograms, and meter/sec away and I explain dimensional analysis through smiley faces, hot dogs, frowny faces, and hamburgers. To do this I set a certain number of smiley faces equal to hamburgers... read more

Tip 1:  Always get to know your student, but be sure to keep it at a professional level and nothing too personal   Tip 2:  Play certain educational games that can include learning definitions, or formulas    Tip 3:  Don't be too serious,  try to have a relaxing environment so the student won't feel so uptight   Tip 4:  Try to include comedy in the routine, from what I've learned most students either "hate" the subject and want to get it over with, but adding a comedic level to the subject can make them have a better attitude towards learning it.   Tip 5:  If a student does well on a test, I may bring in a snack or something to reward them with for their hard work

Proficient tutoring for good success is packaged to help students learn the concepts and techniques required to improve grades, reasoning tests and achieve good success in life endeavors. For the students who are preparing to pass exams, write thesis and dissertations must be ready to face challenges and go beyond the normal and old school techniques. To others who regard the subject to be so difficult and confusing must change their mind set towards possibility with a step by step approach to solving problems. The goal of my proficient tutoring is to help students improves their grade levels, pass exams in flying colors and defend thesis/dissertations with confidence. A proficient tutoring for good success provides the best skills and techniques to students so that, they can understand better on how to solve problems through a step by step approach at minimum cost towards a sustainable development in Education. The goal of proficient tutoring can be achieved with the... read more

It really depends upon the subject being tutored and the needs of the student as to how much prep time I would need. It would also depend upon the learning style of the student. Humor is important: a happy student learns more and retains more of what they learn. Some students just want to buckle down and learn the subject needed to pass so for them a little humor goes a long way. Clean funny life experiences work best to help the student reflect on where they are now and where they are going in life. It also allows for a mental health break during the learning process.

This post is inspired by an article I read, “Be Less Helpful” by Joshua Zucker (can be found at this link: http://www.mathteacherscircle.org/assets/legacy/newsletter/MTCircularAutumn2012.pdf) and I am here to relate it to my teaching and tutoring experiences. When working with students, it can be easy to watch struggling students and thoughtlessly just give them the answers. Why do we do this? Well, for a variety of reasons. Maybe we empathize with the struggling student and want to alleviate their pain. Perhaps we are impatient and have already solved the problem mentally several times over. Maybe we think the question is asking too much of the students. Perhaps we’re worried that they are taking too much time and should move on to the next problem. Maybe they have made three incorrect guesses and we feel it’s time to just give it to them. Perhaps we are really enthusiastic about teaching and are overly anxious to show them how to do it. (Remember, depending on the subject... read more

1. Relate materials to the students preferred interests. For example, if the student likes animals, you can teach categorization and counting by having a student count all the horses in a farm full of animals, teach paragraph writing by letting the student choose an animal to write about, teach volume by having a student discover how many square feet an animal needs for a pen and then have them create a pen of that size, etc.    2. Mix it up. Sometimes too much of a routine can be a bad thing. Always be willing to find new ways to teach the same topic. Use crossword puzzles to teach vocab instead of just having students write out definitions, teach simple math skills with color-by-numbers sheets (e.g. color sections red whenever the answer is 2), use white boards and race your student to see who can do the problem first (obviously the student should be first often!), let younger students doing writing exercise with a crayon of their favorite color from time... read more

I like to use the same methods I use in my class to make it fun, in my tutoring. I make my classroom interactive, active, group collaborative, relevant  and I encourage student discussion, participation and feedback. I can't think of anything worse than sitting down with a boring person to study !!

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