Search

Blogs Blogs

Trigonometry Blogs

Newest Most Active

I am a mathematics tutor living in McKinney, TX just 25 miles north of Dallas. Some surrounding cities are too far away for me to drive to/from every tutoring session, however I am setup to tutor remotely if my students are interested. Here is how remote tutoring works: 1) For my first tutoring session we meet in person at the student's home. I do not charge for the long driving times for my first visit. 2) After our first face-to-face tutoring session, I setup their Internet connected computer for remote collaboration. 3) We then write down the ISBN numbers ant titles of each of the text books the student is using. I use these to search Amazon.com for a good used copy of the books. 4) For subsequent tutoring sessions we use the phone and Internet connected computers to learn. I can interact with their home computer, highlight text, draw graphs, etc. in real-time. I know this works since I use this method to tutor my 12th grade son in math when... read more

Math Student's Civil Rights   I have the right to learn Math (Math is learnable like other subjects) I have a right to make mistakes, erase then, and try again (Failure points to what I have not learned yet) I have the right to ask for help (asking for help is a great decision) I have the right to ask questions when I don't understand (understanding is the primary goal) I have the right to ask questions until I understand (perseverance is priceless) I have the right to receive help and not feel stupid for receiving it (asking for help is natural) I have the right to not like some math concepts or disciplines (i.e. trigonometry, statistics, differential equations, etc.) I have the right to define success as learning no matter how I feel about Math or supporters I have the right to reduce negative self-talk & feelings I have the right to be treated as a person capable of learning I have the right to assess a helper's ability to... read more

I was working with a student today, and as we worked through the section in his book dealing with Trigonometric Identities and Pythagorean Identities, we stumbled across a problem that gave us a bit of trouble. The solution is not so complicated, but it sure had us stumped earlier.   The problem was presented as such:       Factor and simplify the following using Trigonometric and Pythagorean Identities:   sec3(x) - sec2(x) - sec(x) + 1       We tried a couple of different approaches, such as factoring sec(x) from each term:   sec(x) * [ sec2(x) - sec(x) - 1 + 1/sec(x) ]   and factoring sec2(x) from each term:   sec2(x) * [ sec(x) - 1 - 1/sec(x) + 1/sec2(x) ]   We followed these approaches through a few steps, but nothing we were attempting led to the solution. After doing some reading online, I found that the solution required a simple... read more

Here are some of my favorite Math resources. Check back again soon, this list is always growing! I also recommend school textbooks, your local library, and used bookstores. As a note, college-level math textbooks are often helpful for high school math students. Why is that? Isn't that a little counter-intuitive? Yes, it would appear that way! However, many college-level math textbooks are written with the idea that many college students may not have taken a math class in a year or more, so they are written with more detailed explanations. This can be particularly helpful for high school students taking Algebra, Geometry, and Trig. I have a collection of college-level math books that I purchased at a local used bookstore. The most expensive used math book I own cost $26 used. Books that focus on standardized test prep (such as the SAT, AP, or GED prep) can be helpful for all core subjects, as they summarize key ideas more succinctly than 'normal' textbooks. These are GREAT... read more

My first year in college (a very long time ago...!), I came home for the Thanksgiving Holiday and learned that my younger brother, Chip, was struggling with Trigonometry.  Chip was pretty smart, so I was a bit puzzled as to why he would be having trouble.   I sat down with him, and within about 15 minutes I discovered that he had missed one key concept early in the school year, and had been confused ever since.  Once I explained that to him, the light went on in his head, and everything fell into place for him.   I was horrified that a bright, promising student like my brother would be left to flounder because his teacher did not have the time to sit down with him for just 15 minutes to figure out why he was struggling.  But the truth was (and still is) that many teachers are very overloaded, and really can't devote extra time to individual students.  A typical high school math teacher may have four or more classes with 35+ students... read more

1. No one was born to lose. The best of my students understand this principle like the backs of their hands. No, there is no inherent genetic formula or organic compound you can use to get an A in a class. We are all products of our hardwork and investments. Whoever decides to put in excellent work will definitely reap excellent results. 2. Always aim for gold. Have you heard that there is a pot of gold lying somewhere at the end of the rainbow? It's true! Okay, I'm just joking, but my best students always aim for the gold. The very best. As, not Bs, or Cs, or Ds. Just the very best. The one thing people don't think they are capable of achieving is the best. The top of the class. Or the valedictorian. 3. Never settle for less. My best students are innovative, inquisitive thinkers. They tend to think outside the box, never settling for "just what they got from class." They love to use real life examples and explore how theory comes alive in their personal experiences... read more

Alegbra: http://www.nysedregents.org/algebraone/   Algebra 2/Trigonometry: http://www.nysedregents.org/a2trig/home.html   Geometry: http://www.nysedregents.org/geometrycc/   Math A, Math B, Integrated Algebra, Other Math: http://www.nysedregents.org/regents_math.html   Chemistry: http://www.nysedregents.org/Chemistry/   Earth Science: http://www.nysedregents.org/EarthScience/   Physics: http://www.nysedregents.org/Physics/    

I have been working with a few students who are ready to learn math much, MUCH faster than allowed by the traditional classroom model in which math is taught over 6 to 8 years. Based on this experience I believe that many students as young as 4th grade and as old as 8th grade (when starting in the program) can master math in 2 years from simple addition through the first semester of Calculus, with Arithmetic, Algebra 1, Geometry, Algebra 2, Precalculus, Probability, Statistics, and Trigonometry in between. This is significantly faster than the traditional approach and is enabled by a combination of one-on-one teaching and coaching and a variety of media that I assign to students to complete in between our sessions. This is a "leveraged blended learning" approach that makes use of online software, selected games, and selected videos with guided notes that I have created that ensure that students pick up the key points of the videos, and which we discuss later. The result... read more

Hello Miss Gil, I received a 96% in Global History. I was so excited to hear these words from my student! At first she did not want to be tutored. Her father dropped her off at the Library. So I told her that if she did the practice test, and did well, she would never have to see me again. Well, she scored a 58%, and there were so many events and topics that she did not know. We scheduled 3 additional three hour sessions. By the last session, her essays had improved and her overall score was an 83%. I told her that I believe that she can score as much as a 95% on the Regents Exam. She laughed and said "Yeah right". Well she scored a 96% and I am very proud of her.

I am happy to announce that all my students have passed the NY State Regents examinations, except one student.  The subjects varied from Algebra 1, Algebra 11/Trigonometry, English, US and Global History and Living Environment.  I am so proud of them.  Most of these students are students who struggled quite a bit.  It was a long journey but one I would do again.    I am very proud of them as most of them will be graduating this year.  The NY State Common Core examinations are next.

Should I get a tutor? Will it help my child? These are some of the most common questions posed to tutors by parents of students struggling in school. Tutoring can be expensive and difficult to schedule so parents must decide whether the time and money will be well spent. Instead of relying on a crystal ball, use these factors to help make the decision. 1. Does the student spend an appropriate amount of time on homework and studies? While it can help with study skills, organization, and motivation, tutoring cannot be expected to keep the student on track unless you plan on having a session every night. If you can make sure the student puts in effort outside of tutoring, she will be more likely benefit from it. 2. Does the student have difficulty learning from the textbook? If this is the case, the student will probably respond to one-on-one instruction that is more personalized. A tutor will help bring the subject to life and engage the student. A good tutor will explain... read more

The unit circle is one of the most important concepts to understand in Trigonometry.   As a tutor who emphasizes understanding and comprehension over memorization, I try to make it as easy as possible for my students.   Here's the way I like to look at it:   1) First, realize that the unit circle is simply a few points drawn on an graph with an x-axis and a y-axis. 2) Recognize that there is an overall pattern. Every 90 degrees (0, 90, 180, 270) is a combination of 0 and 1 (positive and negative). Every 45 degrees (45, 135, 225, 315) is √2/2 (positive and negative). Every 30 degrees (30, 60, 120, 150, 210, 240, 300, 330) are combinations of 1/2 and √3/2 (positive and negative).   This means that you only have to remember three numbers: 1/2, √2/2, and √3/2 (positive and negative).   The first quadrant (0-90 degrees), has all positive numbers, just like you'd expect in any other graph. The... read more

I ran across this little flash widget which gives a great perspective on trigonometry:   http://www.touchtrigonometry.org/ You should always strive to learn efficiently. Ask the questions, How, what, where, why when learning a new topic. Always practice what you have learned. For kids the last is especially important. Without adequate practice, the knowledge fades away. Without enough practice resources, kids get bored. It's just like at the gym, you have to alternate the weights you use so that your body doesn't get bored. How much more important is that with the brain when exercising and learning a new topic? 

In high school geometry, we learned of the perfect right triangle. Both sides and the hypotenuse are integers (whole numbers). The perfect right triangle shown was 3, 4, 5. (3 sq + 4 sq = 9 + 16 = 25 = 5 sq). I wondered if there were others. Years later, I seriously searched for other perfect right triangles. I began with a list of the squares of whole numbers and the difference between one square and the next (the "delta"). Discovery #1: The series of deltas = the series of odd numbers. I looked for deltas which are squares. Since the series of deltas is the series of odd numbers, the square of every odd number is the difference between two squares. Discovery #2: Every odd number 3 and above is the side of a right triangle. Implication of Discovery # 2: Since there is an infinite number of odd numbers, there is an infinite number of perfect right triangles. Next, a formula for finding the other sides and hypotenuse of a right triangle was worked... read more

We did it!  With hard work, determination, my high school students passed their regents exams.  I tutored US and Global History, Living Environment, Earth Science, Algebra Core, Algebra 2/Trigonometry, Geometry and Chemistry and the students passed.  One student passed with a 70%, another 75%, 76% and another 79%.  All the other students scored 80% and up.    I am so proud of my students.  Well done students and parents, we did it!

The majority of the students that I have often have the same problem -- they aren't grasping the information fast enough or they aren't really able to follow the lessons a teacher gives.   Sometimes, teachers aren't adaptive to every learning style for each student in their classroom.  However, know that each student has the capability to learn math on their own.  It is just necessary to have key characteristics to make it successful.   Every math student should have: patience motivation adaptability organizational skills open communication between themselves and their teacher (inside and outside the classroom) breaks!! :)   Study Tips Always try to study outside of your home or dorm room. In our minds, those are places that we relax at and it can be difficult to turn your mind off from the distractions to study. Public libraries, universities, coffee shops, and bookstores are the way to go. Some... read more

Ken B., known as "The Best Little Tutor In Texas", has just surpassed the 400 hour tutoring mark in Houston, Texas! What makes Ken so good and popular in Houston? It is because of his diverse background and of being able to do the following: mathematics, statistics, chemistry, physics, computers, and computer programming. He can help a student in many many different areas. Ken does both high school and college and does regular, honors, IB, PAP, AP, etc... All that is quite a talent. Ken says that the subject most tutored in the past several months is statistics, and the reason for that is that most teachers use the 'dump' method...they 'dump' a copious quantity of power point files onto the student but the teachers do not really teach how to 'do' the problems...he has seen the same trend with other subject areas, and this is most unfortunate for students taking the classes...so, if you need to get on top of your mathematics and science courses (except of biology), then Ken... read more

1 2 3 4 5

Trigonometry Blogs RSS feed