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As one of our outstanding tutors was diligently tutoring one of her student’s last week, we will call him Drew; she asked him, “Which letter comes first, the C or the K?” Drew’s response was not what she expected to here….he said, “I can’t tell, they keep moving”. This is a phenomenon is common among people with dyslexia, but Jess had not personally experienced this; no one in her family and none of my students have ever spoken of this being an issue for them. When Jess’ second oldest son, we will call him Angel, was in school they found overlays to be helpful. Jess assumed that would be beneficial for moving letters as well. When she returned to the office, Jess began doing some research and sure enough, overlays are the suggested remedy for words and letter movement. Drew, who is 9, quickly wanted to tell the teacher the exciting news! His tutor had to explain to Drew that first, he needs to find out what color works best for him. Interestingly enough, different... read more

As a college student with a difficult major and two minors, my timetable is my best friend.  It's not an exaggeration when I say that I live and breathe by it.  I don't schedule anything without looking at it, and if anyone (friend, professor, boss, etc.) asks me, "Do you have free time at [X]?", I just email them a copy of it.   If you don't have a timetable, then that might be why you can't seem to manage your time properly.  And I don't just have my classes scheduled.  Every single thing I ever have to do is logged in it.  This includes, but isn't limited to :   Classes Work study Work (outside of work study, like here!) Meal times Homework times (further divided up by class) Tutoring appointments (for me and my classes) Extracurriculars (the number of which has shrunk as my college career has gone on) Cleaning the apartment Me time (because who can live without down time?) Sleep time Now,... read more

The most requested tutoring subject is MATH! Many students struggle with math (algebra, geometry, calculus) because there is no easy way to learn it. It is nice to have someone to break it down for you and talk you through your problems. But, what happens when you do not have your tutor next to you?!?!   PANIC?! OF COURSE NOT!   Although it is my duty for you to have a firm grasp on the math concepts, I may not always be there when you need me (of course, I will always try =)). What I used as a math student and what I use as a math tutor is a study "cheat-sheet" guide. I would make my own cheat sheets that broke down steps and had formulas with explanations of what each variable meant. This was a HUGE HELP when learning new concepts or having to remember old concepts for a final exam.   As you continue to learn new concepts, you add it to your cheat sheet. These should be very short blurbs like a formula or a short example of the problem... read more

I thought I'd take a moment to share some of the resources I find most useful for beginning Japanese learners! I highly recommend you supplement them with a class or tutoring sessions, but please take a look. 1. Real Kana: http://realkana.com/   This is an excellent site for memorizing hiragana and katakana (the first step for any Japanese learner). It simply shows you a character, and you must type the romanization. (For example, ? = a) There is also a kanji version (for more advanced learners). This is great for memorizing readings, but it doesn't show you any english definitions, which is a big drawback in my opinion.   Warning: make sure you learn how to pronounce each sound correctly! (This is where a tutor comes in handy~ *wink*).     2. Genki Kanji Practice: http://genki.japantimes.co.jp/self/kanji-reading-practice   Genki is one of the common textbooks used for Beginning Japanese (another... read more

The first thing you as a student should do to prepare for your first visit with your Tutor, is to gather all of the correspondence you have between your Teacher or Professor and yourself.  Key items would be a syllabus, or a list of things your Teacher or Professor expects you to accomplish during your course.  This list should include a list or chart of how the grading will be assessed for that course.  If any of this is no longer in your possession, get a new copy and protect it.    The next thing you should do is to gather all of the resources available to you for the course.  These items include textbooks, online links, handouts, and tools.  This should include anything recommended by your Teacher or Professor to help you succeed in the course.  This also should include anything you normally use for that course, even if it was recommended by someone else, such as an adviser.  Have a general idea of what each of these items are... read more

Do you have a number of students who enjoy learning games, or online quizzes, or instant feedback?  I enjoy using a few sites that prove both entertaining and reinforcing for several of my students.  Though some require an annual fee, I find these sites advantageous, time-saving and totally worth the small expense. My first choice is Quia.com .  I have a number of "pages" on this site.  These are web pages that I have generated (with their tools).  Each has many links to sources that I have found helpful in teaching the particular course and level of attainment suitable to an individual student. Next, I use the site Quizlet.com to produce vocabulary and spelling lists.  This can be personalized, individualized and private or shared with the general public.  The annual fee is very small, and students can access their "class" at no cost to them. Many of my students enjoy using freerice.com .  This has a multiple-choice... read more

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