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PSY 101 for Chess To Begin – The attempt to better understand Chess, the human mind, and the world at large is attained incrementally by the evolution of various theories. Trying on and testing out a given perspective in chess or psychology can be enlightening. By conducting our own experiments, we can see for ourselves if the understanding of our own mind or the great game of chess is enhanced by a particular vantage point. Fortunately, for us humans, it is our personal experience that will tell us if a theory of mind or approach to understanding chess is rewarding. When we find a perspective that seems to agree with our idiosyncratic selves and proves of value in our laboratory testing at clubs, skittles and tournaments, it should be further explored, developed and perhaps evolved. By example, in chess, a hypermodern approach opines that you need not occupy the center as paramount to winning the game. Instead, as Nimzowitsch maintained, indirect influence of the... read more

Psychologists have a doctoral degree in psychology (Psy.D. or Ph.D.) and are professionally trained to assess, diagnose and treat mental health issues. They have advanced training in counseling, psychotherapy, psychological testing, and the science of behavior change. Psychologists are the only professionals qualified to use certain kinds of psychological tests to assess intelligence, emotional and behavioral problems, and neuropsychological dysfunction. In addition to this degree, he or she must pass professional state examinations, complete one-year of supervised postdoctoral clinical work, and agree to follow ethical codes and standards of practice.   Psychiatrists obtain a degree in medicine (M.D.) and then take at least 4 years of specialized residency training in psychiatry, which generally refers to the study, assessment, and treatment of emotional and behavioral problems. Their treatment of choice is most often pharmacotherapy (medication), often augmented by psychotherapy... read more

One of the most important things you can do as a parent or caregiver is to learn the early signs of Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) and become familiar with the typical developmental milestones that your child should be reaching. Children with autism will have symptoms from a very young age, beginning before the age of three. Some children with an ASD show hints of future problems within the first few months of life. Other children appear to develop normally until 18–24 months, then either stop gaining new skills or lose some they’ve already developed. While every child develops differently, we also know that early treatment improves outcomes, often dramatically. AutismSpeaks.org and MyAutism.org identifies the following "red flags" that may indicate your child is at risk for an autism spectrum disorder. If your child exhibits any of the following, please don’t delay in asking for an evaluation: · Avoidance of eye contact · No response to name by 12 months ·... read more

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