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The most requested tutoring subject is MATH! Many students struggle with math (algebra, geometry, calculus) because there is no easy way to learn it. It is nice to have someone to break it down for you and talk you through your problems. But, what happens when you do not have your tutor next to you?!?!   PANIC?! OF COURSE NOT!   Although it is my duty for you to have a firm grasp on the math concepts, I may not always be there when you need me (of course, I will always try =)). What I used as a math student and what I use as a math tutor is a study "cheat-sheet" guide. I would make my own cheat sheets that broke down steps and had formulas with explanations of what each variable meant. This was a HUGE HELP when learning new concepts or having to remember old concepts for a final exam.   As you continue to learn new concepts, you add it to your cheat sheet. These should be very short blurbs like a formula or a short example of the problem... read more

As a parent or even a tutor looking to get the best and be the best of the best I often ask, "What makes my tutoring so special?" As tutors, I believe we all strive to take tutoring to another level so I decided to share what I do. I do not merely teach students in a specific subject, instead I help students to become independent thinkers. Over time I equip students with the resources to develop enough critical thinking skills so that I simply become an advisor or academic coach, helping to guide my students in their academic quest. Therefore I believe a tutor is a coach whose goal is motivate students to become independent thinkers and effective math problem solvers. My Tutoring Process My strong education background and Christian values has influenced my tutoring process. My tutoring sessions employ the use of research based strategies to help students to understand the standards they are required to master for their grade level... read more

One reason why mathematics seems to be a monster to be feared by many people seems to be the perception that there is only one way to solve a given problem developed by a nameless, faceless genius mathematician and in order to get the correct answer, you must memorize and use the appropriate magical equation.  I blame the teachers and professors of the early-on math courses.   The truth is that there are always more than one way to solve a math problem.  It's only a matter of finding the method which you feel most comfortable with, the one you understand the most.  As long as you realize that there are many ways to solve a mathematics problem, and you can find that method for each problem you find the easiest, you will do well in anything mathematical.

Sure, we have all heard our math teachers say "Study for your test tomorrow." While we can all agree the importance of studying and getting prepared for an exam, not many math teachers actually tell you HOW to study. I am sure we have all spent time making flash cards, staring at our notes, or watching last minute videos on youtube, only to realize the test results often don't correlate to our effort. Before long, these upsetting experiences and test results created a scar in our minds, that statement we have all heard before: I am just not good at math.   The truth of the matter is, many people who have expressed their inability to understand and perform well on mathematics simply don't know how to study for a math exam. After all, those negative signs and multiple choice questions are often so tricky, even though you calculated every step correctly until the very end, all it took was one single mindless error that can well ruin the entire result. If we closely... read more

Hello Wzyant Academic Community and welcome to my blog section! This is where I am available for online chit-chat, educational assistance free of charge, business discussions & arrangements, and more! I am always eager to help and love to talk turkey with all realms of academia, so don't be shy and feel free to ask many questions!!!       P.S.  ∫∑∞√−±÷⁄∇¾φΩ

Everyone is and can be a mathematician.  Mathematics is the language of the universe, and as is the case with all human endeavors, learning mathematics is just a matter of time, effort and will.  The will to learn and try.  One of the most important aspects of mathematics is arithmetic, and knowing the laws of arithmetic can help solve any problem.  Try an idea and work it out on paper.  If it does not work, that's okay, try again.  We learn from mistakes, and the longer effort is applied the better one becomes at a task.  When questions do come up (the only dumb question is an unasked question), Mathematics tutors are here to help.

Here are some basic tips for helping students succeed in Mathematics   1. Memorize the rules (For an example when multiplying two negatives the answer becomes positive) 2. Review example problems  3. Be efficient in basic addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division 4. Show your work 5. Double check your answers 6. Ask questions if you do not understand  

Here are 48 of my favorite math words in 12 groups of 4. Each group has words in it that can be thought of at the same time or are a tool for doing math.   between on over in   each multiply of many   ratio divisions distribution compartments   limit neighborhood proximity boundary   infinite infitesmal mark differentiation   graph width height depth   circle sphere point interval   hyper extra spacetime dimensional   geometry proportion sketch spatial   four table cross squared   target rearrange outcome result   area volume space place   What are your favorite math words? If you aren't sure, search for "mathematical words" and pick a few.

I'm going to list what I believe are the key concepts that you need to master across different math subjects. These are the tools that I have to use most often in order to solve problems, so you should get very familiar with the theory behind them and very comfortable with applying them.   Algebra 1: order of operation (PEMDAS) solving equations slope-intercept form of linear equations point-slope form of linear equations systems of linear equations (elimination and substitution methods) inequalities domain and range undefined and imaginary expressions asymptotes (horizontal and vertical) discontinuities (removable and non-removable) rational expressions factoring quadratic formula radical properties exponent properties transformations and translations of functions   Algebra 2:   1. recognizing and factoring the three most common polynomial forms: quadratic equations common factor expressions... read more

This post will be an ongoing project for one of my students who loves history but isn't so much into math.   I know that studying math history has made the math much more interesting for me personally after I started to become aware of the stories and struggles of the people who strove to bring this field to us in its present form. Things weren't always so simple and clear, and it took lots of effort and trial for us to get here. We should be conscious of and thankful for all the tools we've been given by the great minds that came before us.   I hope that this intersection of the two subjects will help Dylan and others not only gain interest in math but also begin to genuinely enjoy it. More to come soon...       Entry #1: Who "invented" Calculus?   If you're familiar with math history, you know that Calculus represents the most recent field of discovery among the major fields of study in math, unlike older... read more

Dr. Bob suggests that a basic mathematics course be introduced for nurses and medical professionals on a multi-year schedule in well-defined programs with continuous certification as a continuous program in hospitals and certification programs especially if medical errors occur.   Medication Errors with the Dosing of Insulin: Problems across the Continuum Pa Patient Saf Advis 2010 Mar;7(1):9-17.      ABSTRACT Controlling blood sugars with insulin is essential in the management of hyperglycemia in both diabetic and nondiabetic patients. However, studies have shown that the use of insulin has been associated with more medication errors than any other type or class of drug. From January 2008 to June 6, 2009, Pennsylvania healthcare facilities submitted 2,685 event reports to the Authority that mentioned medication errors involving the use of insulin products. The most common types of medication error associated with insulin were... read more

When taking a math course there are four things that a student should learn.   The Fundamentals The fundamentals include the definitions, the rules of operations, and the tactics of manipulation. It is essential that you understand the definitions and can visualize them. The rules of operations need to be practiced until they are second nature but they should never be divorced from a simple illustration that explains the rules. The tactics of manipulation are the sequences of steps needed to solve the types of problems that will be encountered. “As strange as it may sound, the power of mathematics rests on its evasion of all unnecessary thought and on its wonderful saving of mental operations”. (Ernst Mach Paul)   The Applications to Problem Solving Math is the language of science. Math was developed to solve problems. You are in this course because you have other courses that will require the problem solving... read more

I am taking from The Official Hunter College High School Test: problem 76 on page 20. We read the following. In the expression below, each letter represents a one digit number. Where the same letter appears, it represents the same number in each case. Each distinct letter represents a different number. In order to make the equation true, what number must replace C?    AAA    AAB + ABC   2012 A great start is to decode each AAA, AAB, and ABC. It helps to look at this problem wholly; particularly we look at the leading sum on the left wall (of the same types). We glean that either: (1) A + A + A = 20, (2) A + A + A + 1 = 20 or (3) A + A + A + 2 = 20: its very important to remember that given three numbers each less than ten, the sum of them which is great, is at most 2 in the tens place. This means that each row can only donate a 1 or 2 to the next. We can conclude that our line is... read more

Hi there and welcome to my blog! This is my first post, with hopefully many to follow.   In my undergraduate years, I learned about a very curious summation discovered by the great Ramanujan. Since then, whenever a student tells me that they hate mathematics and that it is stupid, I show this to them and they almost always see math in a new and enthusiastic light. Here, I will explain the series to you, and hope that it brings you as much excitement and curiousity as it first brought me.   Consider the series 1+2+3+4+5+6+... The series is simple, we simply add two to one, then add three, then four, then 5, and keep going forever. The series is called a "monotonic series", meaning that it is ever increasing. This should be intuitive, since if we look at the first few terms, we have   1 = 1 1 + 2 = 3 1 + 2 + 3 = 6 1 + 2 + 3 + 4 = 10   If we continue the process, this... read more

Don’t be stubborn: its The Monty Hall Problem. This is one of the least generally understood problems of all time. My hypothesis: the reason most people fail on The Monty Hall problem is that it isn’t straight, and it involves changing plans. If you don’t know, the way this works is that you are on a game show and must find a prize behind one of three doors. You pick a door and then The Game Show Host reveals that the prize is not behind one of the two remaining doors. With due intellect your supposed to reason that it is always advisable two switch your selection. What isn’t understood during the time the game show hosts open the door is that he will never open a door that has the prize in it. He will always open a null door. Vital information is encoded by the pact the game show host has with the producers and it moves in the transaction between the game show host and you. Think of it as the elements of America being encoded to the writing and voice of Stephen King... read more

To whom taking Calculus, it has been a long journey to finish all the prep courses successfully.  Smart, intelligent, so they get excited for this new challenging subject.  There are some students who heard about its difficultiness from their seniors, having trouble of making decision of whether taking or not.  But it is a mandatory subject you have to take to get in any important majors in the colleges.   Yes, Calculus is not an easy subject, and many failed.  However, it is not difficult if you understand well.  It is not the subject that you just memorize the formula and replace numbers to get answers.  It requires a lot of thinking.  Take time, read the topics, understand by trying to get the meaning behind.     For example, when you read the first part of Calculus, it is about the Limits.  It looks easy and they just go.   There are a lot of explanations but seem to be not much things in it.  Then... read more

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