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Do you have trouble making sense of word problems?  Try these tips:   1)  What is the problem asking you to do? -- Circle the question or problem statement.  This is usually at the end of the problem.  (Write an equation?) -- Is this similar to other problems you have solved?  If so, how?  (Equations of a line?) -- What will be the form of the answer?  (y = mx + b ?    or   Ax + By = C  ?  or something else?)   2)  Identify the data. -- Underline the data in the word problem.   -- Double-underline the units, if specified.  (miles, km, number of cows, etc.)   3)  Draw a picture (or graph). -- Make sure you have a good understanding of what is happening in the problem.   4)  Write a "math sentence" if appropriate   5)  Solve   6)  Check   A final step -- celebrate... read more

The most requested tutoring subject is MATH! Many students struggle with math (algebra, geometry, calculus) because there is no easy way to learn it. It is nice to have someone to break it down for you and talk you through your problems. But, what happens when you do not have your tutor next to you?!?!   PANIC?! OF COURSE NOT!   Although it is my duty for you to have a firm grasp on the math concepts, I may not always be there when you need me (of course, I will always try =)). What I used as a math student and what I use as a math tutor is a study "cheat-sheet" guide. I would make my own cheat sheets that broke down steps and had formulas with explanations of what each variable meant. This was a HUGE HELP when learning new concepts or having to remember old concepts for a final exam.   As you continue to learn new concepts, you add it to your cheat sheet. These should be very short blurbs like a formula or a short example of the problem... read more

1) THE BASE: Ask yourself where you want to start. A building is strongest and most stable at the base. So that being said, you want to build a strong and stable foundation on the subject you want to learn. Concepts, rules, understanding play a big role when learning a subject. Grasping the fundamental ideology of a subject is the beginning of formulating the bases of understanding the core concepts. So in other words get a general picture of the subject and read the history behind it.   2) START SMALL BUT BROAD: Every subject has a broad category and a specific category. The more in-depth you go, the more confusing it can become if you don't have the general knowledge or a broad understanding of that subject. For example, you're not going to understand Calculus 2 without learning Calculus. Or understand how your brain creates memories or thoughts without understanding neurons. So by researching, reading, and analyzing the broad categories of the subject you can learn... read more

1) THE BASE: Ask yourself where you want to start. A building is strongest and most stable at the base. So that being said, you want to build a strong and stable foundation on the subject you want to learn. Concepts, rules, understanding play a big role when learning a subject. Grasping the fundamental ideology of a subject is the beginning of formulating the bases of understanding the core concepts. So in other words get a general picture of the subject and read the history behind it.   2) START SMALL BUT BROAD: Every subject has a broad category and a specific category. The more in-depth you go, the more confusing it can become if you don't have the general knowledge or a broad understanding of that subject. For example, you're not going to understand Calculus 2 without learning Calculus. Or understand how your brain creates memories or thoughts without understanding neurons. So by researching, reading, and analyzing the broad categories of the subject you can learn... read more

Never have I ever done a tutoring job like this before.  I am looking forward to partaking in this website and venture as a side job because it seems like a reasonable way to generate income on the side without stressing yourself out. I'm looking forward to teaching kids and passing on my knowledge of subjects through tips and tricks to make their learning easier, like it did for myself.  Most of all, I can't wait to see the results from my students when they receive their grades or start to perform better at the sports I coach them in.

I had a great math teacher in seventh grade.  Coach Hopkins was just one of those teachers that made math look so easy when he demonstrated problems on the chalkboard.  For some reason, he was always smiling.  Believe me, in seventh grade, a smiling teacher who made me feel like he liked his job and his students was a bright spot in my day.  I was lucky enough to have him again in college for an algebra class.  He made math seem so simple!  I learned that when you go into a department store, and the tag says 40% off of a $25.00 blouse, you don't have to figure out what 40% off is and subtract that amount from $25.00.  There is a faster, easier way.  Since the blouse is 40% off, that actually means you will pay 60% of the retail price.  So, we only have to multiply $25.00 times 60%, and we have the price of the blouse.  For instance:     $25.00 x .60 = $15.00                 ... read more

School can be tough sometimes- really tough. When after-school tutoring, intersession (extra time in the classroom during breaks), and individualized attention isn’t enough, what do you do next? What can you do to ensure your child’s success? How do you know when it's time to get some extra help? 1. Homework is an exceptionally difficult chore- for everyone. When your child is exhibiting avoidance behaviors when you bring up the subject of homework, it might be time for outside help. Avoidance behaviors with homework usually take the form of bargaining, whining, excuses, ignoring homework, or even disappearing to a bedroom or friend’s house when it’s time to do homework. If your child is actively avoiding homework, it might be a sign of poor comprehension, poor time management, or a lack of motivation. Either way, a private tutor can help address these problems. 2. Tears are common during homework time. It might not just be your child who has tears... read more

Working with my first student, I noticed on many of her work samples that she did not complete the assignment/assessment.  The completed work was often correct.   When I asked her to tell me about it, she said looking at the whole page (with lots and lots of math problems) made it seem hard.  I asked her how it felt when we simply folded a page in half, and her face beamed.  She responded that it didn't look nearly as "scary".   Dad was studying at the next table with a huge binder for a test for his job. Commiserating with her, he said his page sometimes looks overwhelming, too.  When I showed my student how to fold her paper, Dad folded his, also, and enthusiastically remarked that the shortened page did make it seem easier.   Sometimes something simple is a super improvement!

Although new to WyzAnt, I have tutored mathematics for the past four years at college. One thing I notice among many students is a great deal of annoyance towards mathematics. They feel mathematics to be too abstract, rigorous, relentless, and just plain boring. Most students either prefer a subject they will end up using in "real life", or a subject that gives them a sense of wonder. However, the amazing thing about mathematics is how truly wonderful it is for me. Most people who see my attitude towards mathematics (including others who are reasonably adept at math) find this odd or misplaced, and I fully understand their lack of sympathy. Perhaps you are one of them. But I can assure everyone reading this there is something truly mysterious about mathematics that breaches the very foundations of astonishment and awe. Take prime numbers for example. It's pretty clear that you can take any whole number and decompose it down into a product of prime... read more

Hello Wzyant Academic Community and welcome to my blog section! This is where I am available for online chit-chat, educational assistance free of charge, business discussions & arrangements, and more! I am always eager to help and love to talk turkey with all realms of academia, so don't be shy and feel free to ask many questions!!!       P.S.  ∫∑∞√−±÷⁄∇¾φΩ

I'm going to list what I believe are the key concepts that you need to master across different math subjects. These are the tools that I have to use most often in order to solve problems, so you should get very familiar with the theory behind them and very comfortable with applying them.   Algebra 1: order of operation (PEMDAS) solving equations slope-intercept form of linear equations point-slope form of linear equations systems of linear equations (elimination and substitution methods) inequalities domain and range undefined and imaginary expressions asymptotes (horizontal and vertical) discontinuities (removable and non-removable) rational expressions factoring quadratic formula radical properties exponent properties transformations and translations of functions   Algebra 2:   1. recognizing and factoring the three most common polynomial forms: quadratic equations common factor expressions... read more

One of the biggest frustrations for students is getting something wrong that they know how to do. What is usually the problem?  Careless errors. Do students really care less? Probably, they care less for writing everything down step by step. They care less about labeling the formulas.  They care less about thinking about why they keep making that mistake. For some reason, I have found that students have the perception that smart people don't write stuff down. Students believe that "smart"  people hold it all in their heads. Well, here's the real deal. Smart people write almost everything down with meticulous attention to detail. They know that the "blackboard " in their head gets erased quickly. There's nothing more frustrating than trying to figure out what you did wrong when you don't have a record of what you did. I call it the dance in your head that leads nowhere!  What's the cure? If you believe that your student is being careless  Tell... read more

It was once said, while I was still young, "if you build it, they will come."   Fast forward to the future, which is today, and those age-old words still reverberate truth - with far more twists of ambiguity.   I extend an open invitation to all those bold enough to take me up on the challenges and adventures only found in Math Club. Accompany me along the Abacus Path where together we can truly build it - a community where the love of numbers and how they mold and shape nearly every aspect of our lives takes us to new plateaus of rich learning experiences!    

I have found many schools unable to expose students to math and science in the laboratory environment due to costs. I have found a great place fro students to work on all kinds of math and science activities on line. I have all of my students work on the speed drill under arithmetic. Fluency in math is critical.  Please take a look at this website and let me know what you think.   http://phet.colorado.edu    

Today, the future depends on you as much as it does on me. The future also depends on educating the masses in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math, otherwise known as STEM. As a new tutor to WyzAnt, I hope to instill the importance of these subjects in student's lives, as well as, the lives around them.    Besides the fact that,  "the average U.S. salary is $43,460, compared with the average STEM salary of $77,880," (Careerbuilder) these subjects are interesting and applicable to topics well beyond the classroom. Success first starts with you; I am only there to help you succeed along the way. STEM are difficult subjects. Yet when you seek out help from a tutor, like myself, you have what it takes to master them.    Please enlighten me on students looking to achieve and succeed rather than live in the past and think I can't as opposed to I can. We can take the trip to the future together, one question at a time

Look at math as something fun like a crossword puzzle. Choose some an advanced problem or two that require more practice to remember like imaginary numbers or logarithms. Review one a day just to commit it to memory. You'll need those as mathematic foundations anyway. It doesn't require much time, a few minutes a day for a problem a day. It'll keep your skills strong and you'll be ready to go when classes start again.

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