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Meta-cognition is thinking about thinking, and higher levels tend to be associated with intelligence and - in the parlance of the times - high income and job satisfaction. So, to keep things simple: if you think that you might struggle with learning concepts in statistics or research methods, then get in touch with a tutor early. It's important to establish some type of relationship so you can evaluate their style, methods, and how likely it is that you'll be successful within their approach. If you wait too long, or right before an assignment is upon you, you may be stuck with a limited number of tutors that you are forced to work with.    Prevention through establishing early contact will help you iron out details, assess a match in learning and tutoring styles, and prepare for mastering any difficult concept.   Don't wait - contact tutors before it's too late!

As I think about how my own passion for my practice became an art form, I also begin to explore what I consider to be my mastery, as posed by this question by WyzAnt: How did you master a subject or concept that challenged you in school?   I then thought about why I like art. I believe art is limitless because it is freeing, it allows us not to think in binaries but to put it in a large grey scale. It allows us to put into perspective something that we have discovered to be a passion or interest greater than what we have known it to be before provoking it.   I went into school believing that I found what I was interested couldn't be found in it. It's true. I discovered I loved poetry. I loved conceptual writing, which is a little like weird internet poetry but more directed towards looking at writing as an art. In other words, writing that in itself can indicate a relation with something else outside of it. For example, the font, weight, colors... read more

Every student that I have tutored in organic chemistry asks me how I became adept at this rather challenging subject.  I tell them all the same thing: use your resources. A teaching professor that I worked with taught me from his many years of teaching experience, when a student utilizes at least seven resources, their mastery of the subject of organic chemistry increases (linearly), i.e., the average improvement was one to two letter grades over the course of a semester.  These resources include, but are not limited to, going to class, reading the text, taking and reading over notes from class, attending study groups, outside tutoring, supplemental instruction (SI), reading a concise supplemental text, working problems, etc.   Organic chemistry is a difficult subject to understand when you are taking it for the first time (and after!). To become successful at, and to truly master organic chemistry at the level required for graduate school or medical school admission,... read more

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