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?Perhaps you are wondering, "What are all of these dys'?" Well allow me to enlighten you... they are Neurological differences in the brain that cause people to learn differently than the majority of people learn. Dyslexia is of course the most known of the 4 cousins, but they are all real. 1 in 5 people have dyslexia, 1 in 10 people have dysgraphia. All require people to learn differently than how traditional schools teach students to learn. All of these words are of Greek origin. Dys means badly. Lexia mean to write. Calculia is math and praxia are whole coordination systems. Dyslexia is a language based learning difference. Dyslexia refers to a cluster of symptoms, that result in people having difficulties with specific language skills, particularly reading. Students with dyslexia often experience difficulties with both oral and written other language skills, such as writing, and pronouncing words and writing. Dyslexia affects individuals throughout their... read more

For most fluent readers, it can be hard to imagine how the sight word "have" can be tricky for emerging readers. Yet many parents drilling the Dolch sight words find "have" is misread over and over again, made to rhyme with "gave" and "behave". The child is likely making this mistake because he or she is diligently applying the guidance that a silent final E makes the preceding vowel say its name. And for many English speakers, that's the only purpose known for a silent final E. But, that only explains half of the words with a silent final E and has nothing to do with why there is a silent final E in "have". So, why is there a silent final E in "have"? Check out rule #3 in the list posted here: https://www.logicofenglish.com/resources/spelling-rules. Rule 3 states that English words do not end in I, U, V, or J. The silent final E in "have" is there to prevent the word from ending in V, just as... read more

Have you ever wondered what spelling bee champs know about spelling? I have, and my research led me straight to the 31 spelling rules as taught in the Logic of English method. These simple yet powerful rules explain 98% of English words when coupled with 74 phonograms. While that may not be enough to win an elite spelling bee, its a huge step forward for everyday literacy. The 31 rules are posted here: https://www.logicofenglish.com/resources/spelling-rules. While most are remarkably simple, they are quite powerful. Consider how the very first rule explains the answers to these tricky word equations: picnic + ing = picnicking notice + able = noticeable Rule 1 states that "C always softens to /s/ when followed by E, I, or Y. Otherwise, C says /k/." Thus, picnicking gets its K because without it, the word would say /picnising/. Likewise, noticeable retains its E because without it, the word would say /notikable/. I'd love... read more

English is widely regarded as being full of exceptions, and often logical/literal learners struggle with the ways in which it is commonly taught. Fortunately, though, there is logic to our language, and methods have been developed that carefully distill it into a limited number of spelling rules and phonograms. These concepts are quite simple to learn but very powerful in application, transforming English from a confusing jumble of exceptions to a deliciously rich and robust code. An introduction to these concepts is posted at https://youtu.be/4ilthoEG39M?t=19m59s. The entire video is informative and inspirational, but if you’re pressed for time and want to sample some of the real meat of the content, jump ahead to the 20 minute mark and watch for about 8 minutes. I'd love to hear what you think. Is this content helpful? Did you learn anything new? Please leave a comment below and share your thoughts.

Sometimes, I feel that the same lesson plan can get old over time. It is important to have variation in my lessons to keep my students excited. I do come up with my own teaching ideas but I also like to search for other ones because I am always open to trying something new. This is why I like to use linkstolearning.com as a source for hearing about other lesson activities. You should give it a try!   http://www.linkstolearning.com/elementary_language_arts.htm   The website has many different classroom activities for Language Arts for all ages! You can find worksheets, lesson plans, games, and links to other useful websites. I enjoy going through them and finding useful links to spice up my lesson a bit. Trust me, it will help your students learn and have fun!     Jane

After several months of carrying some pretty heavy textbooks around with me, I recently decided to switch to a Kindle Fire and start using electronic textbooks. Although there are times when a good old-fashioned book really cannot be replaced, I'm very pleased with the weight of my tutoring bag now, and my students seem to be enjoying the switch as well.   I'm able to download textbooks for free in some cases ("Boundless" publishing), and I also have several different dictionaries and other reference books a tap away! Any other books I might find helpful for my students? Just a few clicks away. This also frees up my paper textbooks to loan to my students in-between sessions. Using a Kindle gives me the added benefit of being able to load educational applications to use for practice and reinforcement. Since we are in the 'computer testing' age, this also gives my students some extra practice in preparing for computerized exams. I'm sure you'll notice... read more

Here are some of my favorite Language Arts resources. Check back again soon, this list is always growing! I also recommend school textbooks, your local library, and used bookstores.     (K-2) Starfall.com – Practice, tutorials, and assistance with students learning phonics. (K-5) Tumblebooks.com – A free, online library of e-books for students K-5; younger students can choose to have this software read to them as they read along (K-3) Storylineonline.net – Read along to your favorite children’s stories with celebrity narrators like James Earl Jones. Sorted by title, author, and narrator. (K-12) Readwritethink.org – Click on “Parent and After School Resources,” for a great list, sorted by grade level, to help your child practice a variety of different skill sets at home (ex: giving an interview, thinking citrically, writing activities, etc) (K-5) Learninglab.org *- Provides great lessons on life skills (self-esteem, bullying,... read more

The Importance of Learning Critical Languages   Make yourself unique in whatever subject matter you pursue. Today, we will talk about languages that will land you a job much faster than you think.   The Problem: Americans need to clearly recognize that there is a deficiency of critical spoken languages in the U.S. The United States government has acknowledged that it seeks efforts to expand the number of Americans studying and mastering critical need foreign languages. Solution: In order to considerably diminish this debilitating problem, Americans need a strong network of critical language communicators that can quickly and efficiently bring defined segments of the nation up to speed in speaking critical languages. Approach: Americans should take the initiative to study, learn and master such languages using educational institutions, live human-interactive and intensive critical language instruction via the internet... read more

     Writing and Reading Arts are recursive processes. That is they constantly impact and influence one another. The process of writing has not changed. It consists of seven basic steps: Pre-write, Rough Draft, Revise, Response Group, Edit, Teacher Conference, and Publish, grade, celebrate! The difference then is how the teacher uses strategies to impart this knowledge to the student. Practice does not make perfect, but perfect practice makes perfect! It is up to the teacher to find out what modalities, the student best learns in, and present material in that way. At the same time teachers must have students work on areas of learning they are weak in, because higher education requires you be a thinker that learns from stimuli that is physical or even total physical response, for special needs, (kinesthetic), visual, auditory, graphophonic. The teacher models for the student to self monitor. Many do this by talking to themselves and asking themselves questions and... read more

First and foremost, let me introduce myself. I am a Faculty working at MSDU(Metro State Denver University). I have begun my 16th year of teaching in the Fall of 2013, and every day is a new opportunity to learn things. I am currently teaching at a middle school in Arizona. My teaching philosophy is simple. I believe every child can be taught, and it is up to the educator to find that proper motivation for learning through various strategies and techniques. As I will mention below, this blog will serve mainly as a resource for parents and those looking for information about education. That being said, I will also be posting ‘tidbits‘ about the classroom for anybody interested in reading… As previously mentioned, this blog will serve as a resource for any parent looking for information about their student’s class, any teacher looking for information [grades 2 and up], or anyone looking to share ideas for the classroom. I will be posting lesson plans, homework assignments, class... read more

Hi, Do you need help improving your Language Arts skills? Perhaps, you have a child or grandchild who just needs a little extra help. Reading and comprehending what you read helps in all areas of life. Reading and Language Arts are the key to success in all areas. Please contact WyzAnt Tutoring and check out all the great tutors who specialize in English and related subjects. Thank you and good luck.

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