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If I could go back in time and give myself some advice ... Well, that's quite a questions. And the answers are not as easy as one might think. We are who we are based on the lessons we have learned over time. If we didn't make mistakes, we would not learn. We might avoid a pitfall here and there, but we wouldn't learn the lessons behind the lessons - the root cause, as it were, for why it was a mistake in the first place. However, one piece of advice I would like to give myself in the past is this: listen to the advice you are given. As I look back, I was given some great advice by a lot of people while I was growing up. Some of it, thankfully, I not only listened to, but took to heart. Some I didn't. When I analyze those things I have done in the past that turned out to be mistakes, I can almost always trace the root of a bad decision back to not following the advice someone had given me earlier. So, with that in mind, I would like to share two of the best pieces of... read more

Everyone knows that demonstrating the ability to think critically on tests and assignments and in writing is the way to your teacher’s or professor’s heart. But how do you do that when you don’t even know what critical thinking is? Although “critical thinking” is a much debated term, I would simply call it your ability to analyze a given issue or problem. Okay, great, you say ... so what the heck does that mean? Well ... it depends. There’s all sorts of different types of analysis. A math problem, for example, requires a different type of analysis from say the analysis of a world history essay prompt. Trying to figure out ... or analyze ... , the different reasons why your dog threw up on your favorite pair of sneakers is a bit different from trying to figure out why the author of novel chose to kill off the main character of the book you were just assigned to read. Although, I can see where my description of analysis above might frustrate those expecting a straightforward... read more

IF I could go back in time and give my younger self some advice on how to be a better student, be more successful in school, life, etc, I would definitely tell myself that being involved in everything comes at a cost. It is better to find a few things that you like to do, do them well and often, than feeling stressed because there is so much on your plate at one time. Being a 'Jack of all Trades' it is natural for me to dip my toes in different waters- all at the same time, but that does not mean that I can give 100% to any of them at that time. While I was able to get good grades (A- average) while in school, I was impressed by how much better I did- and felt about my work- the few times that I scaled back on my activities. Another piece of advice that I wish that I could bestow upon my younger self would be to learn how to speak up in a group setting when someone is not fulfilling their part of an agreement. Now, this said, the best way to do this would be in a tactful manner-... read more

History is all about studying the past. But, haven't we always been taught to "look towards the future"? Yes, but we also need to know the mistakes that have been made historically to look towards the future. So how do we determine what important historical information we need to know? Well...that's definitely a debatable topic. However, knowing the challenges those before us faced is a significant place to start! As I learn so many interesting things I am amazed by how I now look at past and current issues. Making sure our youth understand the importance of how we became the greatest nation in the world is so important. Why? Well let's take a look at some issues that are currently debated, such as gun control. The 2nd Amendment states: "A well regulated militia, being necessary to the security of a free state, the right of the people to keep and bear arms, shall not be infringed." This Amendment has been interpreted in so many ways. However, what is not... read more

Hello and welcome to my Blog page. As I jump into tutoring, I hope to fill this page with helpful tips and techniques that I pick up along the way. For example, a great way to study English is to read. The more a person reads, the more vocabulary, grammar, structure, etc. is picked up and translated into their own writing. Even if it is a small article each day, reading motivates the mind. This daily routine is especially important to English learners (ESL). Academic writings, such as articles, should be considered as a first choice in English aid. History and historical perspectives are also great teachers. To get inspired, watch a documentary online, write your own historical interpretation of a recent event, or be a news reporter for a day. For information on my endorsements and work experiences, please feel free to contact me. Thank you for your consideration!

Q. Where will we meet for tutoring? A. We will try to find a suitable place that is convenient for both of us. Though I do travel to meet you, time and distance are important factors in making this work feasible and profitable for me, so I try to find locations that minimize my travel time, while also providing convenience to you. Q. How will we decide on a time to meet? A. We will try to find a suitable time that is convenient for both of us. Q. When are you available to tutor? A. It varies from week to week, but my general availability begins at 10:00 a.m., Monday through Saturday, and ends at 9:00 p.m., Monday through Friday, and at 3:00 pm Saturday. Please contact me for my current availability. Q. How long will each session be? A. The session length can vary, depending on the subject, the student, and the schedule. Unless otherwise agreed, the session times will be two (2) hours each. Q. Why do you recommend two (2) hours per session? A. Through... read more

Many of my students have told me that Social Studies or History is their worst subject. When I ask why, they say they “just don’t get it”. I usually find out that they have a hard time connecting the dots. For example, they learn about the American Revolution but don’t understand how it connects to King George III and the Declaration of Independence. This article gives parents, tutors, and teachers some hints and tips for helping students connect the people, places, and events of history to improve their comprehension. 1. Use historical thinking skills. The National Center for History in the Schools (NCHS) is a UCLA - based organization dedicated to collaborating with schools and teachers to provide “engaging and exciting explorations of U.S. and World history.” (From the NCHS mission statement; use this link to visit their website: http://www.nchs.ucla.edu/.) One powerful tool they created is their list of five historical thinking skills teachers, parents, and tutors can use to... read more

As you know, all teachers (and tutors!) were once students. So they know all the pitfalls that can cause a student to not get their homework done. The reason can be social - maybe the student wants to get his or her work done but the distraction of all the social media is too much to resist. The reason can also be academic - maybe the subject is difficult, such as challenging concepts or perhaps they're faced with an assignment that didn't get explained well enough to be done independently. Or sometimes it's the dreaded PROCRASTINATION. That can be the worst of all reasons to not get work done because the longer you procrastinate, the more the work piles up and then the student becomes "paralyzed", overwhelmed by the mountain of work that has accumulated. When procrastination has gotten the better of you, the important thing is to not let yourself be so overwhelmed that you don't do the work at all. Here's what you do: PRIORITIZE AND GET STARTED! It is a simple phrase... read more

Summer learning loss can affect everyone. Teachers must spend quite a bit of time in the beginning of every year reviewing to get students past the summer slump. There are a variety of ways you can keep yourself or your child from losing to much ground over summer. One of the best ways to keep the brain sharp and active is to keep reading both fiction and nonfiction literature at or above grade level. Even if it is only 25 minutes a day, you will keep the reading skills sharp and continue to learn new things. I also found out that Barnes and Nobles is offering a free new book reward to children who read 8 books. You can check out their website or visit the nearest store for more information. Whether in a cool place during the heat of the day, or as part of the night time relaxation, reading for 25 or more minutes is possibly the best time investment you can make. There are also many kinds of puzzles you can practice solving such as Suduko to keep the math and problem solving skills... read more

Writing a research paper is one of the most difficult parts of being a student. You find yourself asking: - How do I start? - What is a thesis statement? - How do I determine if this is a credible source? - How do I make an in-text citation? - Why do I even need a citation? - What is a bibliography? - WHAT AM I DOING? Whether you are in middle school, high school, college, or even graduate school, the following websites provide information about research papers. With a click of the mouse, you can find answers to all of your questions and put an end to those research worries. Purdue Online Writing Lab One of the most useful website you will ever visit. Everything from writing, researching, grammar, mechanics, citations, and formatting – it’s all here! http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/658/01/ Google Scholar A great place to start begin your research and gather information on your topic. http://scholar.google.com/schhp... read more

Although there are many things you will learn in your academic career that you may never use again, there are just as many that you will use on a regular basis or will come in handy when you least expect it. The basics of any subject will never let you down. You DO need to know how to add, subtract, multiply and divide in YOUR HEAD. Why? Because people make mistakes when inputting data into calculators and computers. The answer that comes out of those devices is only as good as the data that went in. If you are shopping and something is advertised as 25% percent off, you should be able to do the mental math to determine if it really is a good deal or not. When applying for a job and writing a cover letter or resume, you better be using grammatically correct sentence structure or the person who is reading either one will decide that if you can't write a simple cover letter, you aren't worth the time to interview. Learning about cultures other than your own will be invaluable... read more

Over and over I hear from students that their teachers don't require them to use their textbooks; instead the teacher uses power point presentations and has students take notes. Here is the problem with that way of thinking. MOST students don't take really good notes which makes it difficult to complete homework or to study for tests. THINK OF YOUR TEXTBOOK AS YOUR BEST FRIEND. It is the go to guy for those questions you need help answering. Your textbook includes the curriculum that your teacher is required to cover, hence it has the answers within its pages. Your teachers tend to follow the flow of the textbook for the order of their lessons, so if you take the time to read the chapter that comes after what you are currently studying, you will already have some knowledge about the material your teacher will be presenting next. This makes note taking so much easier and gives you a heads up on material you may find confusing which, in turn, allows you the opportunity to ask your teacher... read more

I am so excited that I found WyzAnt!! It has been wonderful! I have met so many new people and love helping work with my students to see them advance! I worked in the public schools for 7 years and loved every minute of it when I had my SPED Resource Room for Learning Disabled, Dyslexic, and ADD/ADHD students. I got to see so many young people better themselves and get passed that learning barrier to advance and become great students that even went on to college. That is what I am about!! I want my students to have the best opportunities that are out there! Just because your child may need a tutor, that does not mean that they will not surpass your ideas or their ideas for their future!! I have very HIGH expectations for my students and love to challenge them to surpass those goals to go on to new heights. Looking forward to working with more students! WyzAnt is terrific!

My emerging tutoring passion is assisting ESL college students with their coursework. Most of them must also hold full-time jobs to support themselves and often their families as well. Many require online courses to get college educations. They could not earn a college degree any other way. Do textbook publishing companies realize how much cultural bias is written into their online ancillary (supplemental) materials? Do teachers of online college courses realize how hopeless these students feel about merely passing a class when their grades depend on online multiple-choice exams consisting of 60 items to be completed in 60 minutes (60 in 60), for example? This may be a subtle form of cultural bias, but bias it is. Frankly, as a native speaker of American English with a master’s degree in journalism from University of Wisconsin—Madison, I’m not sure I could pass a 60 in 60 exam. I would like to challenge the instructors who teach these online courses and college administrators... read more

On June 2, 1989, my life changed forever. A brand new world was brought to my attention. I moved into the main land of the United States. I am Puerto Rican, meaning natural born American, but was raised on the island of Puerto Rico. Don't get me wrong, I have always been more fourtunate than most people with my condition. You see, I have a condition called Spina Bifida. I guess it would make more sense if I explain myself. Normally, during the first month of a pregnancy, the two sides of the spine (or backbone) join together to cover the spinal cord, spinal nerves and meninges (the tissues covering the spinal cord). Spina bifida refers to any birth defect involving incomplete closure of the spine. Myelomeningocele is the most common type of Spina Bifida. It is a neural tube defect in which the bones of the spine do not completely form, resulting in an incomplete spinal canal. This causes the spinal cord and meninges (the tissues covering the spinal cord) to stick out of the... read more

I'm pumped! I just got word that my profile was accepted and is up on the board. I am so ready to start tutoring! I've been doing a lot of research about tutoring; of course I would do research -- it's my specialty! I am an information specialist by profession, a.k.a. a librarian, and a teacher. One of the best things about having a librarian as your tutor is that in the course of a day, we can travel from one side of the world to the other, exploring histories, cultures, and geography. During the same day, we can also work deep inside the earth or deep in outer space studying gyroscopes, geometry, or geophysical patterns. Sometimes we time travel over thousands of years in a single morning, studying ancient civilizations, modern democracies, and everything in-between. There are few topics I haven't explored. What's more, I've helped kids write about everything under the sun -- and on it too. People think we're all about finding stuff, but as a school IS (information specialist),... read more

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