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Welcome, 2016!   As the New Year rolls around, it's always a sure bet that there will be changes to current tax law and 2016 is no different. From health savings accounts to retirement contributions and standard deductions, here's a checklist of tax changes to help you plan the year ahead. Individuals For 2016, more than 50 tax provisions are affected by inflation adjustments, including personal exemptions, AMT exemption amounts, and foreign earned income exclusion. For 2016, the tax rate structure, which ranges from 10 to 39.6 percent, remains the same as in 2015, but tax-bracket thresholds increase for each filing status. Standard deductions and the personal exemption have also been adjusted upward to reflect inflation. For details see the article, "Tax Brackets, Deductions, and Exemptions for 2016," below. Alternative Minimum Tax (AMT) Exemption amounts for the AMT, which was made permanent by the American Taxpayer Relief Act (ATRA)... read more

The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010, in concert with the enactment of the Health Care and Education Tax Credits Reconciliation Act of 2010, resulted in a number of changes to the US tax code. As such there are a number of tax implications for individuals and businesses. Individuals Healthcare Exchanges   Healthcare Exchanges, which are also referred to as Health Insurance Marketplaces, officially opened for enrollment on October 1, 2013. Some of these exchanges are run by the state in which you reside. Others are run by the federal government. Individuals (including self-employed) who do not currently have insurance or buy insurance on their own can use these marketplaces to buy insurance, which becomes effective January 1 of each year. When you get health insurance through the Marketplace, you may be able to get the new advance Premium Tax Credit that will immediately help lower your monthly premium. Individual Mandate Starting... read more

Welcome 2015! As the new year rolls around, it's always a sure bet that there will be changes to current tax law and 2015 is no different. From health savings accounts to retirement contributions and standard deductions, here's a checklist of tax changes to help you plan the year ahead. Individuals For 2015, more than 40 tax provisions are affected by inflation adjustments, including personal exemptions, AMT exemption amounts, and foreign earned income exclusion, as well as most retirement contribution limits. For 2015, the tax rate structure, which ranges from 10 to 39.6 percent, remains the same as in 2014, but tax-bracket thresholds increase for each filing status. Standard deductions and the personal exemption have also been adjusted upward to reflect inflation. For details see the article, "Tax Brackets, Deductions, and Exemptions for 2015," below. Alternative Minimum Tax (AMT) Exemption amounts for the AMT, which was made permanent... read more

More than 40 tax provisions, including the tax rate schedules, and other tax changes are adjusted for inflation in 2015. Let's take a look at the ones most likely to affect taxpayers like you. The tax rate of 39.6 percent affects singles whose income exceeds $413,200 ($464,850 for married taxpayers filing a joint return), up from $406,750 and $457,600, respectively. The other marginal rates--10, 15, 25, 28, 33 and 35 percent--and the related income tax thresholds are described in the revenue procedure. The standard deduction rises to $6,300 for singles and married persons filing separate returns and $12,600 for married couples filing jointly, up from $6,200 and $12,400, respectively, for tax year 2014. The standard deduction for heads of household rises to $9,250, up from $9,100. The limitation for itemized deductions to be claimed on tax year 2015 returns of individuals begins with incomes of $258,250 or more ($309,900 for married couples filing jointly). The personal exemption... read more

This year, there are some changes to tax forms related to the Affordable Care Act. Along with several new lines on existing forms, there are also two new forms that need to be included with some tax returns. While most taxpayers simply need to check a box on their tax return to indicate they had health coverage for all of 2014, there are new lines on Forms 1040, 1040A, and 1040EZ related to the health care law. Information about the new forms and updates to existing forms is summarized below: Form 8965, Health Coverage Exemptions Complete this form to report a Marketplace-granted coverage exemption or claim an IRS-granted coverage exemption on the return. Use the worksheet in the Form 8965 Instructions to calculate the shared responsibility payment. Form 8962, Premium Tax Credit Complete this form to reconcile advance payments of the premium tax credit, and to claim this credit on the tax return. Additionally, if individuals purchased coverage... read more

Starting with this year's filing season, taxpayers must report certain information related to health care coverage on their 2014 tax return when they file this April. In addition, taxpayers must provide proof of health insurance coverage or that they have received an exemption. With that in mind, let's take a look at how the Affordable Care Act might affect your tax situation, and based on your type of coverage, which new tax forms you might be receiving.   Overview The biggest change for most taxpayers is found on Line 61 of Form 1040, where individuals must either check a box to show they had health insurance or pay a penalty. In general, the penalty applies to individuals who did not have health insurance for more than three months in 2014. In 2014, the penalty is the greater of one percent of modified adjusted gross income or $95 per adult ($47.50 per child under age 18, up to a maximum of $285 per family). While the IRS cannot issue a lien against you... read more

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