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Hello everyone!    I figured I could start off my first post with a little bit more information about what I have to offer to any of my students.   Currently, I am 18 and finishing my Senior year of High School at an all girls' school in Rochester, NY. I will be attending a college nearby in the fall and planning on majoring in English with a concentration in creative writing and minoring in Psychology.    I have completed seven AP courses in my high school career including World History, U.S. History, European History, Language and Composition, Literature and Composition, Biology, and Psychology. I have taken AP tests on all of these subjects and can help students who are preparing to take these tests to prepare effectively considering I myself have taken them.    I am mostly interesting in tutoring English students K-12 as that is the subject I am best at, but I am also able to tutor in any of the subjects listed... read more

I recently read a new-ish novel by one of my favorite authors, the incomparable Terry Pratchett, that provided me with some much-needed food for thought. The Long Earth, a collaboration between Pratchett and Stephen Baxter, centers around the invention and distribution of a simple contraption enabling its user to 'step' between an infinite number of parallel dimensions. Each of these dimensions is slightly different from every other, possibly depicting a series of 'what if?' alternate Earths, and the entirety together is referred to as 'The Long Earth.' One of the most curious things about the Long Earth, however, is that none of these alternate Earths have any humans on them – no cities, no civilizations, simply wild and beautiful vistas with plenty of local wildlife and a few enigmatic 'humanoid' races that are rarely seen. Forget space travel – mankind can simply step across the Long Earth and find millions of pristine new worlds to conquer! The novel brings up quite... read more

Contrary to popular belief, MLA format was not designed by English teachers as a torture technique. It is used to keep you in the legal clear zone while writing. MLA format establishes guidelines that allow you to include academic research without being suspected or (worse) convicted of plagiarism. It also allows those reading, be it professors or scholars in your academic field, the chance to see where you are getting your evidence to support your claims.   The best one stop shop for MLA format is the Purdue Owl, which can be found at this web address: https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/747/01/   This website gives not only the rules, but examples of citing sources in different medias (print, web, video). When in doubt I always look to Purdue. Save yourself time and trouble and bookmark it right now.   With their specific examples you will be on your way to a beautifully cited research paper.

War of the Worlds, by H.G. Wells, is classic science fiction. Written in 1924, it depicts the catastrophic and totally unexpected near-extinction of humanity by aliens from Mars. One of the main themes running through War of the Worlds is the idea that mankind's assumptions about their world, the universe and the nature of life are constantly being challenged. The main reason the martians' landing is so catastrophic to humankind is because the humans, by and large, have been lulled into a false sense of security. They believe they are capable of overcoming anything, that they are the most powerful beings in the universe, and as such are completely unprepared for the martians' attack. Humans at the beginning of H.G. Wells's novel are portrayed as very self-satisfied. Even when confronted with the landing of the first martian cylinder, humanity is quick to dismiss the event as a mere curiosity. The story on the eve of the first day was “dead men from Mars,” (P. 14) and... read more

Title choice is an often-overlooked aspect of literature. What the author chooses to call his or her work can serve as a window into their intentions, showing in a subtle way the aspects of the novel to which they wish to draw the reader's attention. As an example, take Emily Brontë's classic novel Wuthering Heights. According to the dictionary, “wuthering” means “blowing strongly with a roaring sound” when describing a wind, and “characterized by such a sound” when describing a place. The word also has close associations with the more common “weathering,” implying enduring harsh weather or coming through a storm. Throughout Brontë's novel are references to this idea of weathering out a storm or withstanding howling winds. Most of the major plot developments take place during thunderstorms, and the various characters are likened to different aspects of a storm. This theme comes to a head during Heathcliff's disappearance midway through the novel – not coincidentally in the middle of... read more

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