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The SAT and the ACT are arguably the two most important tests in most people's entire lives. Obviously there are additional tests some of us take to further our education but the SAT and now the ACT, will determine the type of college you can attend, which directly affects the type of connections you will make in life and this will eventually determine how much money you will earn as a professional. Make no mistake about it; it IS who you know in life that will ultimately catapult you into higher social and economic classes. The previous rule is why attending the right college is so important. Obviously there are additional factors to consider such as grades, extracurricular activities, sports, and charity work during the college application process but even if you have exceeded all of the previous requirements, that will be moot if you also have a poor SAT/ ACT score. A solid score on the SAT is 2000 and above; for the ACT 28 and higher will put you in the 90% percentile. There is... read more

College application essays are one of my favorite assignments to work on with students. They are a chance for me to get to know my students better as we brainstorm topics for their personal essays. I get to hear about childhood memories, unique family traditions, and uncommon hobbies. I love helping students find their voice and tell their unique stories to colleges. My students do not share my enthusiasm for application essays. They feel immense pressure to produce their best pieces of writing to impress colleges. They have also probably heard vague tidbits of advice on how to accomplish this: stand out, don’t be cliché, and be interesting. It’s no wonder that a lot of students have trouble finding a place to start. Here are a few tips to make college application essays less scary: 1. Reading other essays: Read other well-written college application essays. Many colleges release strong application essays from previous years. Reading an array of these essays... read more

As the college application season begins again, many high school seniors will look for help brainstorming, patching together, and polishing a 500-650 personal statement that may just be the most important piece of writing in their 18 years of life. Having gone through it not too long ago, I know by heart that the process is challenging and can be a bid tedious. Here are some tips I’ve found effective in helping my students piece together a narrative they enjoy and win an admission ticket to selective universities: Pick out some engaging sample essays for your students to read and analyze. Sure, college essays shouldn’t be formulaic, but they must present a full story in a logical, comprehensible fashion. In the past, I’ve always used selections from Gen and Kelly Tanabee’s 50 Successful Stanford Applications and the Guardian-published satirical essay by Hugh Gallagher. I try to stress that while college essays are diverse in style and content, there is often a... read more

Ever wish you could take your side gig and turn it into a fulltime pursuit? That's just what I would do with tutoring because I simply love to tutor, and I am always trying to be better at what I do. Test prep is my tutoring specialty. During our sessions, my students learn subject-specific concepts, incorporate test-taking strategies, and build self-confidence. I assure them that with consistent practice and an unwavering eye on the prize, they can maximize their test results and achieve their academic, business, or personal goals. In fact, students of mine have gone on to attend their choice colleges, earn their teaching licenses, enlist in the US Air Force and other service branches, and pass the bar exam. I so appreciate the extra time my busy clients have taken to express their satisfaction with my services. In return, I want to thank all of my students since 1997 for allowing me to continue tutoring, learning, and enhancing my services to better meet... read more

College admissions officers first look at test scores, grades, and the rigor of courses students take in high school. However, what are also important in the admissions process are a student’s extracurricular activities. Students are a representative of the college they attend, and it goes without saying colleges care about the character of the people they admit to their school. Extracurricular activities are a good indicator of what a student does during his or her time spent outside of school. In other words, what a student is doing over summer vacation and on the weekends, gives admission officers a good idea of what kind of individual they are considering admitting to their college. No doubt about it, volunteerism is very important; however, admissions officers are looking for real hands-on involvement. There is a difference between the student that volunteers once to collect money for a charity and the student who spends every Saturday helping clean up city parks. The... read more

You’ve studied and you’ve prepared, but what comes next? Determining what colleges to apply to and attend is difficult as there are so many factors to consider. At Augmentus Tutoring, we aim to help you achieve your highest possible test scores that provide you with the ability to choose the school that is best for you. There are a multitude of considerations that contribute to this decision, including your goals and personality. We’ve narrowed it down to two top decision making factors: Size and Location. The benefits and considerations listed below are generalizations, so do not hesitate to reach out to a specific school to learn more about their programs. The size of the school affects the size of classrooms, size of athletic programs, and numerous other activities that will impact your overall experience. Attend a Big University Benefits that come with big colleges include a seemingly unlimited list of majors and minors, well-funded sports teams,... read more

Students have a wonderful opportunity to show admissions officers who they really are, by using the college essay to stand out from the crowd. In my experience, if you find a topic that you care about, and you write an essay that speaks from your heart, you will have a successful application experience. Admissions officers have to read dozens of applications per day in the 'busy season'. If you give an application reader a chance to pause, laugh out loud or wonder about the end of the story, and really recognize you as an individual, whether using humor, philosophy, creative writing about a memory or a fictionalized experience, or a profound lesson learned, you will hit a home run!   I am happy to help you get started, and then to edit your results. I do not write essays for students, but I do help you present yourself in the best light possible, and to give you opportunities that you may not find on your own.  Contact me for 3-session essay writing package... read more

I’ve been thinking lately about why college application essays—any personal writing, really—triggers so much anxiety.  Andrew Ferguson gives us a marvelously personal perspective when he describes his experience as a father shepherding his 17-year-old son through writing the college essays during their last holiday break. He calls this process “the Great Extrusion,” where parents brace themselves “while dragging, pulling, tugging word after word and draft after draft from the insides of their mulish offspring until something presentable appeared.” Ferguson first gently, then more forcefully, offers stacks of books with sample essays to his son, as he does all he can to help without actually writing the essay for him.   By contrast, Robin Mamlet, a former Dean of admission, and Christine VanDeVelde, a journalist, offer a professional perspective. Their clear, step-by-step approach to the college essay advises 10 drafts written over the span of at least one month... read more

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