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Through our tendencies of human nature, we don't like to ask for help. We want the recognition, the glory and the credit to be given to only ourselves. Unfortunately, the thought that we can single-handedly do everything on our own is a huge misconception. The world has been built on a foundation of people working together to towards a common goal. The world needs individuals to work together to brainstorm and execute plans for the future.   School and college provide opportunities to work together. Through group projects, presentations, senior design projects, etc. students are asked to work with one another. It is, rather unfortunate, that sometimes we are paired with people who we do not work well with, but that is life. School and college provide students with opportunities to work with people and adapt to others ways--whether we like them or not.   Now, when one must adapt to another's ways (for example a teacher's or professor's) it can sometimes be... read more

A friend of mine recently posed a question to me: "What exactly IS a career student? Is that the guy that has been in his senior year of high school since 2009?" No, young grasshopper, a career student is not that guy. That guy or girl is what we call a senior-senior, and he or she is usually a pretty awesome person that just really enjoys high school. I came up with the term "career student" (peep the tagline) in an effort to describe the types of high school and college students that might be interested in my services and/or what I hope students that use my services will become. A career student is a student that treats their academic life like a professional career. I know a lot of career students, and yes, you want to be one of them.  Career students have certain qualities that they have acquired with lots of effort and support. Anyone can be a career student (even people that HATE school). A lesson I learned after high school... read more

At the beginning of my senior year of college, everyone was panicking about the possibility of not finding a job before graduation. Hence, job fairs were heavily attended. While attending a job fair hosted by the business school, I was encouraged to discuss finance positions at Abercrombie and Fitch by a recruiter. I decided I had nothing to lose and introduced myself. She then asked me what I scored on the SAT. Yes, she was referring to the exam that I took over five years ago. After awkwardly staring at her in disbelief, I answered her question and kindly ended the conversation. I do not agree with how the recruiter tried to put me in a box, but as Tupac said, “I was given this world, I didn’t make it.” Doing well on the SAT pays dividends and high school students may encounter this recruiter in the future, so I have decided to share my experience with the SAT. Five Years Ago… As many of my classmates prepared to gain admission to the University of Texas, I was... read more

You have one hour with a college prep specialist who can help make your admissions/scholarship essays award winning.  How can you maximize your time?  Here are five tips to get the most out of your time:   Come Prepared. - Bring the essay prompts from each of your colleges.  Bring a sample personal statement and resume.  Be sure to have any information necessary to complete an admissions essay, to include your GPA, test scores, and any major accomplishments. Know Thyself - Always know your stats.  During this time, knowing your GPA and SAT score is as important as knowing your name and birthdate.  Also, know (and have a list of) your interests, hobbies, favorite subjects, etc.  Have an idea of at least 3 possible majors and careers you would like to explore. Be on Time - There is a lot to cover!  The better prepared and earlier you are, the more likely we are to get a lot done. Also, I tend to take my time... read more

I remember taking some courses in my early years of undergrad that were pretty awful. The teaching wasn't that bad, and I was definitely awake for them (two key points to getting decent grades) but the subject matter just wasn't something I could ever see myself using. Sound familiar?    Interestingly though, after changing my attitude, I saw that I can indeed use most things learned in most classes, if I am looking for the beneficial parts of each subject. I'm not saying that if you hate science you'll want to start studying the makeup of dirt all of a sudden, but I can definitely assure you that there is a way to dislike things less.    So...how? We have to find ways to connect what math, science, English, or the like teaches us (even if it's under the surface) to what we love in life.    I love children with cancer. You can see more about that here. And even though I had to write that on the front of a lot of notebooks over... read more

Starting a new semester?  Would you like this semester to look differently than previous semesters?  Get ahead of the game.    First, get a calendar or planner.  Use what works for you.  Some students like a print calendar or planner, others like to use an app on their phone or iPad, others feel comfortable with Google calendar.  Whatever you prefer, make sure you use your calendar every day. The first thing to put on your calendar is your schedule.  Actually mark your class times on your calendar.  You might use a different color for each class.  For instance, everything associated with math class might be written or typed in blue, everything for history might be in red, etc.  Using the same color, record any known due dates. Have a paper due in February?  Put it on the calendar.  Know when Spring Break is? Put it on the calendar.  Don't forget to put extra curricular activities, work hours, and tutoring... read more

Scholarship Search Engines   http://www.fastweb.com   www.CollegeNet.com   www.CollegeBoard.com   https://www.scholarships.com/about-us/   http://www.scholarshipmonkey.com   http://www.collegescholarships.com http://www.collegescholarships.org https://bigfuture.collegeboard.org/scholarship-search http://www.college-scholarships.com/free_scholarship_searches.htm https://www.salliemae.com/plan-for-college/scholarships/   Need Based Scholarships   https://studentaid.ed.gov/types/grants-scholarships/finding-scholarships   Tips & Tricks   http://www.collegescholarships.com/application-essays/how-to-win-a-scholarship   http://www.collegescholarships.com/application-essays/scholarship-essays/scholarship-essay-example-1   http://www.usnews.com/education/blogs/the-scholarship-coach/2011/01/20/comp...

Hi all,     So I've reached capacity again this year on students, but I'm trying something new.  I've created a Waiting List rather than hiding my profile.   I'm curious if I'll have a number of students waiting for the same subjects, which will allow me to come up with new ways to help everyone.  Perhaps if I have several students uptown (or wherever) I will be able to offer a group lesson that any/everybody working on the same subjects can attend and help out people on the waiting list. If you're looking to get inspired about Chemistry, I recommend you check out the very cool reactions in this video:  http://time.com/3481898/amazing-chemical-reactions-true-beauty-of-science/   Or if you're a student (or a parent) trying to convince yourself (or your child) about the importance of working hard at Math & Science, I recommend checking out these infographics: http://www.vox.com/2014/10/7/6910485/13-charts-that-explain-why-your-college-major-matters   Hope... read more

These days, high schools tend to defer to parents. If there's a family event, kids are pulled from school. If Bobby gets a bad grade, Mom launches herself into the teacher's office to give her a piece of her mind! Parents track their kids through the day, texting and calling multiple times.   College is different and not just because your kids are away from home, perhaps for the first time. It's different because your kids are expect to behave like adults. That means reading the syllabus, showing up for their classes, not making excuses for work not done, staying clean (yes, clean!) and sober (absolutely sober!) and taking real responsibility for their behavior and work.   Parents need to be aware that the "helicopter parenting" they have done for years not only isn't welcome by colleges, but most often is not welcome either by their kids. Besides being a time of academic preparation, the high school years need to a time when parents start to let... read more

Hello Students!   Start this year off strong with good organizational and note taking skills. Make sure you understand the material and are not just taking notes aimlessly. Try to take in what your teacher is saying and don't be afraid to ask questions!! If you start taking the initiative to learn and understand now, college will be a much more pleasant experience for you. Trust me!   Stay organized and plan your homework and study schedule!   Quiz yourself!   Study with friends!   READ YOUR TEXTBOOK! :)    Remember, homework isn't busy work and a chance to copy down your notes, it is part of the learning process. This is especially important with math, as it builds on itself and understanding the basics will make the other subjects easier!   Have a fantastic and fun year!

I recently came across this article from the Chronicle of Higher Education, urging college professors to fight grade inflation in the Humanities. As a college-level Instructional Assistant, I see this all the time. Students feel that their grade in their Anthropology course should reflect only effort and completion, not the content and understanding. This a trend that is not seen in the STEM fields as readily. As a result, professors are pressured to do just that; grade distribution in nearly all humanities classrooms do not follow a standardized bell curve as they might in a science or math classroom.    This sort of behavior not only devalues the importance of the humanities in our society, but also puts our students at a disadvantage. The humanities (Reading, Writing, and the Social Sciences) not only teaches us valuable lessons about communication, and how to connect with other human beings, but allows as a venue to contextualize the STEM fields as they relate... read more

You’ve studied and you’ve prepared, but what comes next? Determining what colleges to apply to and attend is difficult as there are so many factors to consider. At Augmentus Tutoring, we aim to help you achieve your highest possible test scores that provide you with the ability to choose the school that is best for you. There are a multitude of considerations that contribute to this decision, including your goals and personality. We’ve narrowed it down to two top decision making factors: Size and Location. The benefits and considerations listed below are generalizations, so do not hesitate to reach out to a specific school to learn more about their programs. The size of the school affects the size of classrooms, size of athletic programs, and numerous other activities that will impact your overall experience. Attend a Big University Benefits that come with big colleges include a seemingly unlimited list of majors and minors, well-funded sports teams,... read more

As I held the crisp white letter with the university’s insignia in my hand, I couldn’t believe my eyes. I read the letter once more to ensure that I understood the cold words. If you do not improve academically within the next semester, you will be expelled from this institution. I stood at the mailboxes in my residence hall… suddenly awaken (rudely I would argue) from my cozy assumption that, “I am smart and that’s all that matters”.   Back in 2001 I didn’t realize that peacefully drifting as I did in high school would not serve me well in college. No matter how smart I really am I would not have made it in college by simply paying attention and doing my homework. Study skills are imperative for maximizing success potential. This is no major secret but sadly studies of freshmen reveal that my experience was not isolated. Many students may suffer a blow to their self-confidence when they encounter the more rigorous academic work of higher education . Even more... read more

I am currently teaching SAT courses in the Bay Area, and a lot of students have been enrolling in my math classes.   I wanted to summarize what I think are important aspects of test preparation, as this crucial testing period begins:   1) Know the format of the test 2) Understand how the guessing penalty affects your strategy (e.g. a person scoring a 500 has a different strategy than someone scoring a 700 in math) 3) Do at least 15 practice problems per day. 4) Try to do a full length practice SAT every 3 weeks 5) Target your areas of weakness (and know what your weaknesses are) 6) Don't rush during the test. Rushing only leads to careless mistakes. 7) Be open to new strategies. Sometimes, the way we do things might get us to the right answer, but there may be a more efficient way. The SAT isn't just about accuracy - it's about doing things efficiently. 8) Know your strategies of last resort. Plugging in the answer choices is a... read more

A key aspect I work on with each college applicant is applying for scholarships. Untold millions are set aside very year to give to students of all types to pay for college. Contrary to popular belief, money is out there for students of all kinds, regardless of ethnicity, family income, or academic achievement. The money is scattered about and I streamline the process, consolidate your scholarship search, and help you edit and craft compelling essays and personal statements. My work branding, goal setting, and essay writing for college admissions applies directly to scholarship applications. Corporations, non-profits, and institutions want to give away money to ambitious and prepared students, but your job as a student is to SELL them on you. Identify your brand and convince them that their money won’t be wasted on you. I aim to help every client pay for their investment with me many times over.    It’s almost guaranteed that your investment... read more

Don't let your child suffer, I am available to help students improve and grasp science concepts learned in class as they complete there learning process outside of school through practice in homework and learning study skills that will prepare them for college and higher level education. Homework is very important in the learning process. Your child will become an excellent student and show tremendous growth in the subject of science. Also, I will help prep them for major tests such as the Biology EOC which is MANDATORY for your child to move to the next grade level and graduate on time and on top! BE THE BEST THAT YOU CAN!

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