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I want my students to enjoy the hands on learning experience of fine art, and to accomplish this I strive to create custom curriculum catered to each student. By understanding the needs of my student and what their goals are I can keep their interest and the process of learning fun.  I believe in teaching through encouragement and positivity, and the importance of not taking yourself too seriously.  As Mrs. Frizzle always said, "Its time to take chances, make mistakes, and get messy!"

S., aged 14, invested a bit less time for homework last week, as she was very busy. However, she did experiment with pen-and-ink and has purchased markers and graphite pencils, as well as two sketchbooks of better paper. She is going on vaction soon and I hope she will take her sketchbooks along. I suggested she start to think about drawing portrait and figure. I brought along "Anatomy for the Artist" by Jeno Barcsay and showed her how the artist breaks down human anatomy into components. The book is informative about the skeleto-muscular structure as well. We also discussed the problems of foreshortening while viewing objects (and bodies) in space. I suggested she draw a self portrait sketch or a portrait sketch for homework. Later, I emailed her links to figure sketches by great artists, from Durer and Da VInci to Singer-Sargent and Giacometti. I also brought some small pages of good textured papers of various colors for her to try out, as newsprint... read more

One of my guitar students majored in Drama in college.  As I progress with her lessons, it is increasingly apparent that many approaches to playing music have a lot to do with what she knows as an actor.  One example would be that, much like how any script contains lines more expressive or, arguably, more representative of the plot's importance, musical compositions beg that certain notes, phrases, or harmonic motion be brought to the fore.  Much of the responsibility of both the actor and musician, then, is to study how lines and music may contain human emotion.  Not only that; the artist must make an evaluation of how the work means to create a sense of discourse and then, of course, adhere to those rhetorical conclusions.  I would be happy to discuss this and many other ideas over email and, hopefully, in private lessons.  Thanks!

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