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Start Early: Avoid "In Too Deep?" or "Too Much, Too Fast?"

Many students are fortunate to have tentatively chosen a career path for themselves by the time they have begun high school.  If this path has included a STEM or health-related (i.e., pre-med, pharmacy, dentistry, physician's assistant) discipline, most have been guided along the math track sequence of Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II, Precalculus and sometimes even Calculus.  These should have been taken at a minimum pre-AP (or Honors) level.  Similarly, Chemistry should have commenced with pre-AP level and optionally progressed to AP to have enabled students to have been that much better-prepared for the rigors of college work.
 
At the college stage all higher-level health field-oriented students must take a year of both General Chemistry and Organic Chemistry in that order.  Nursing and physical therapy-bound students typically require less than this.
 
In any case, many college students take some of their Chemistry courses during a fast-paced summer session in order to save both time and money.  When doing this, they must be mindful of not only their past high school Chemistry experiences but also how well they did in a previous college Chemistry course.  For example, I've encountered students who have earned Ds and Cs in fast-track summer General Chemistry I, then proceeded to take General Chemistry II during a 20 day Summer I or II session, and shortly realized they were experiencing major difficulties in dealing with the content mastery for both courses (a good many of these students had also planned to begin Organic Chemistry I in the Fall).  This is a situation that students must realize required appropriate remediation long before having reached this make-or-break point.  Repetition of courses is sometimes the only recourse but must be avoided if at all possible.
 
I'm solidly behind students to guide them over all of their multi-year hurdles in both Chemistry and Math and, therefore, relish the opportunities to do so beginning as early as the 9th grade.  
 
SO, LET'S GET STARTED NOW!  
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