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Decided to stay in Special Education

I decided to stay in the field of Special Education.  My next class will be in classroom management so here's it begins to get interesting.

I'd also love some more experience in Autism and Asperger's syndrome as well.

Still holding my A average at Grand Canyon University in Special Education.

Comments

Just a couple of ideas - I always learned through trial and error, although I have a B.A. and Masters in Special Education.  The REAL classroom is nothing like your textbooks!

Discovered that sudden, or loud noises, can make a student of any age, get hysterical.  If you have a student with Autism, or Asperger's, ask the school administrator to give you a "heads-up".  This way, other teachers or older students are ready to help this student immediately.  I have never had a principal, or administrator who would not give me advance warning.

Parents/Guardian/Caretakers - MUST be involved with an autistic child, or child with Asperger's syndrome.  Be very pro-active with the parent, help build THEIR confidence.  I will comment on one particular child I met when I was teaching a fifth grade, inclusive class.  This child was obviously very intelligent, but almost zero social skills.  He stayed isolated, and when other students approached him, even in a friendly manner, he did not return the friendliness.  (I always became nervous during math because he caught MY errors)!   But, mom and dad took their son to as many social events as possible with other children who were autistic, or had aspergers, or both.  I learned through the parents that there are 'play groups', and other support activities.    Must seek them out.   These parents were very firm with the behavior problems, which was hard for them.  As this young man grew, and actually became taller than his father,  behavior problems could have been serious, but the parents had started teaching boundaries to their son at a very early age.  These parents gave intellectual stimulation constantly - such as chess, music, etc.   Today this young man is in 10th grade, has been a straight A student for the past three years, has won local spelling bees, chess competitions, and LATIN, and GEOGRAPHY competitions.  He smiles, speaks to people, and the only real behavior problem is picking on his  younger brother.  None of this could have been accomplished without the dedication of the parents.  They devoted their lives to this child, and never complained about their own personal sacrifices.  This young man has a very high IQ, interested in computers/science/math.  I know he will continue to do well and succeed in a professional career.

I have worked with other students who did not have as much parental help.  (Or none).  It was very stressful for me because the parents/guardians, did not stress behavior management/teaching boundaries, at home.  Again, a young man, third grade, very intelligent, (Asperger's),  but on a weekly basis had a new fixation on something.  We had to have a "shadow" person with him at all times because he would suddenly be destructive, or hurt another student.

God bless you.   My very first day on the job as a Special Education teacher - I walked into the classroom and a student threw a desk across the room!    Give yourself time to relax as much as possible.  Realize that your "teaching" may not be apparent for a long time.  Autistic children may seem to not hear your instruction, but they usually do!  It will appear when you least expect it.  Frustration is usually normal for teachers in this particular field of special education.  Talk with other teachers.  Some days it seems you ignore other students because so much time is spent with the autistic child.  I felt guilty when I had an autistic child in my class when I didn't believe I gave adequate instruction to the other students.  Be careful about falling into this trap - it will happen.

Let me know how it goes.

Beverly

Just a couple of ideas - I always learned through trial and error, although I have a B.A. and Masters in Special Education.  The REAL classroom is nothing like your textbooks!

Discovered that sudden, or loud noises, can make a student of any age, get hysterical.  If you have a student with Autism, or Asperger's, ask the school administrator to give you a "heads-up" if a fire drill is planned.   This way, other teachers or older students are ready to help this student immediately.  I have never had a principal, or administrator who would not give me advance warning.

Parents/Guardian/Caretakers - MUST be involved with an autistic child, or child with Asperger's syndrome.  Be very pro-active with the parent, help build THEIR confidence.  I will comment on one particular child I met when I was teaching a fifth grade, inclusive class.  This child was obviously very intelligent, but almost zero social skills.  He stayed isolated, and when other students approached him, even in a friendly manner, he did not return the friendliness.  (I always became nervous during math because he caught MY errors)!   But, mom and dad took their son to as many social events as possible with other children who were autistic, or had aspergers, or both.  I learned through the parents that there are 'play groups', and other support activities.    Must seek them out.   These parents were very firm with the behavior problems, which was hard for them.  As this young man grew, and actually became taller than his father,  behavior problems could have been serious, but the parents had started teaching boundaries to their son at a very early age.  These parents gave intellectual stimulation constantly - such as chess, music, etc.   Today this young man is in 10th grade, has been a straight A student for the past three years, has won local spelling bees, chess competitions, and LATIN, and GEOGRAPHY competitions.  He smiles, speaks to people, and the only real behavior problem is picking on his  younger brother.  None of this could have been accomplished without the dedication of the parents.  They devoted their lives to this child, and never complained about their own personal sacrifices.  This young man has a very high IQ, interested in computers/science/math.  I know he will continue to do well and succeed in a professional career.

I have worked with other students who did not have as much parental help.  (Or none).  It was very stressful for me because the parents/guardians, did not stress behavior management/teaching boundaries, at home.  Again, a young man, third grade, very intelligent, (Asperger's),  but on a weekly basis had a new fixation on something.  We had to have a "shadow" person with him at all times because he would suddenly be destructive, or hurt another student.

God bless you.   My very first day on the job as a Special Education teacher - I walked into the classroom and a student threw a desk across the room!    Give yourself time to relax as much as possible.  Realize that your "teaching" may not be apparent for a long time.  Autistic children may seem to not hear your instruction, but they usually do!  It will appear when you least expect it.  Frustration is usually normal for teachers in this particular field of special education.  Talk with other teachers.  Some days it seems you ignore other students because so much time is spent with the autistic child.  I felt guilty when I had an autistic child in my class when I didn't believe I gave adequate instruction to the other students.  Be careful about falling into this trap - it will happen.

Let me know how it goes.

Beverly

Just a couple of ideas - I always learned through trial and error, although I have a B.A. and Masters in Special Education.  The REAL classroom is nothing like your textbooks!  FORGOT TO TELL YOU THE NOISES WHERE DURING FIRE DRILLS, TORNADO DRILLS, etc.

Discovered that sudden, or loud noises, can make a student of any age, get hysterical.  If you have a student with Autism, or Asperger's, ask the school administrator to give you a "heads-up" if a fire drill is planned.   This way, other teachers or older students are ready to help this student immediately.  I have never had a principal, or administrator who would not give me advance warning.

Parents/Guardian/Caretakers - MUST be involved with an autistic child, or child with Asperger's syndrome.  Be very pro-active with the parent, help build THEIR confidence.  I will comment on one particular child I met when I was teaching a fifth grade, inclusive class.  This child was obviously very intelligent, but almost zero social skills.  He stayed isolated, and when other students approached him, even in a friendly manner, he did not return the friendliness.  (I always became nervous during math because he caught MY errors)!   But, mom and dad took their son to as many social events as possible with other children who were autistic, or had aspergers, or both.  I learned through the parents that there are 'play groups', and other support activities.    Must seek them out.   These parents were very firm with the behavior problems, which was hard for them.  As this young man grew, and actually became taller than his father,  behavior problems could have been serious, but the parents had started teaching boundaries to their son at a very early age.  These parents gave intellectual stimulation constantly - such as chess, music, etc.   Today this young man is in 10th grade, has been a straight A student for the past three years, has won local spelling bees, chess competitions, and LATIN, and GEOGRAPHY competitions.  He smiles, speaks to people, and the only real behavior problem is picking on his  younger brother.  None of this could have been accomplished without the dedication of the parents.  They devoted their lives to this child, and never complained about their own personal sacrifices.  This young man has a very high IQ, interested in computers/science/math.  I know he will continue to do well and succeed in a professional career.

I have worked with other students who did not have as much parental help.  (Or none).  It was very stressful for me because the parents/guardians, did not stress behavior management/teaching boundaries, at home.  Again, a young man, third grade, very intelligent, (Asperger's),  but on a weekly basis had a new fixation on something.  We had to have a "shadow" person with him at all times because he would suddenly be destructive, or hurt another student.

God bless you.   My very first day on the job as a Special Education teacher - I walked into the classroom and a student threw a desk across the room!    Give yourself time to relax as much as possible.  Realize that your "teaching" may not be apparent for a long time.  Autistic children may seem to not hear your instruction, but they usually do!  It will appear when you least expect it.  Frustration is usually normal for teachers in this particular field of special education.  Talk with other teachers.  Some days it seems you ignore other students because so much time is spent with the autistic child.  I felt guilty when I had an autistic child in my class when I didn't believe I gave adequate instruction to the other students.  Be careful about falling into this trap - it will happen.

Let me know how it goes.

Beverly

$25p/h

Brenda T.

Experienced Tutor also Substitute Teacher, Colorado Springs, $25/hr