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JH K.

asked • 08/13/20

I have a calculus question

I came across this integral while doing a physics question.


Is it possible to calculate:


∫cos(θ(t)) dt


with θ(t) as function in terms of t.


I'm hoping to somehow remove the integral so it is easier to work with. θ(t) is continuous and differentiable everywhere, if it helps.


Note:


I tried using the Maclaurin expansion of cos(x), but I got stuck at finding:

∫ θ(t)2k+1 dt


for k ∈ [0,∞]






Douglas B.

tutor
What type of function is theta?
Report

08/13/20

Douglas B.

tutor
For example, it would be fairly easy if theta(t) is a polynomial function.
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08/13/20

2 Answers By Expert Tutors

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Douglas B. answered • 08/13/20

Tutor
4.8 (27)

Calculus expertise

Jeffrey K. answered • 08/13/20

Tutor
New to Wyzant

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