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Hello WyzAnt Folks!   I'm new here, and wanted to introduce myself & say hello to everyone!    I've gone through the beginning phases (passing the tests, creating a profile, etc.) at the site, and was wondering if you all --those of you have been at this for a while and have some experience at this, could give me some ideas about what I should do to get my first students, and how I should build up a good profile.   Thank you all for your time.   Respectfully,   - halimur khan

     Most learning follows a curve; not a bell-shaped curve, but a sudden, steep ascent, followed by a plateau. Think about what it was like to learn how to drive a car. You had to consciously remember where the brake and the accelerator were, until it became second nature. That's the pattern for new learning. What has already been learned is usually habitual, so that it becomes unconscious. When learning new, you have to explicitly pay attention to things that later will become second nature. Then the learning is deeply ingrained; so deeply that you don't even have to think about it.       With regard to exam preparation, this steep curve is a reflection of the fact that you learn the preliminary skill set of exam prep strategies relatively quickly, because there are a finite number of things to learn. The ACT in particular is an open book exam in the sense that all the answers are either in the test or in the questions. It's more a... read more

     Most learning follows a curve; not a bell-shaped curve, but a sudden, steep ascent, followed by a plateau. Think about what it was like to learn how to drive a car. You had to consciously remember where the brake and the accelerator were, until it became second nature. That's the pattern for new learning. What has already been learned is usually habitual, so that it becomes unconscious. When learning new, you have to explicitly pay attention to things that later will become second nature. Then the learning is deeply ingrained; so deeply that you don't even have to think about it.       With regard to exam preparation, this steep curve is a reflection of the fact that you learn the preliminary skill set of exam prep strategies relatively quickly, because there are a finite number of things to learn. The ACT in particular is an open book exam in the sense that all the answers are either in the test or in the questions. It's more a... read more

     Most learning follows a curve; not a bell-shaped curve, but a sudden, steep ascent, followed by a plateau. Think about what it was like to learn how to drive a car. You had to consciously remember where the brake and the accelerator were, until it became second nature. That's the pattern for new learning. What has already been learned is usually habitual, so that it becomes unconscious. When learning new, you have to explicitly pay attention to things that later will become second nature. Then the learning is deeply ingrained; so deeply that you don't even have to think about it.       With regard to exam preparation, this steep curve is a reflection of the fact that you learn the preliminary skill set of exam prep strategies relatively quickly, because there are a finite number of things to learn. The ACT in particular is an open book exam in the sense that all the answers are either in the test or in the questions. It's more a... read more

     Most learning follows a curve; not a bell-shaped curve, but a sudden, steep ascent, followed by a plateau. Think about what it was like to learn how to drive a car. You had to consciously remember where the brake and the accelerator were, until it became second nature. That's the pattern for new learning. What has already been learned is usually habitual, so that it becomes unconscious. When learning new, you have to explicitly pay attention to things that later will become second nature. Then the learning is deeply ingrained; so deeply that you don't even have to think about it.       With regard to exam preparation, this steep curve is a reflection of the fact that you learn the preliminary skill set of exam prep strategies relatively quickly, because there are a finite number of things to learn. The ACT in particular is an open book exam in the sense that all the answers are either in the test or in the questions. It's more a... read more

The following policies are outlined below and apply to all students:   Missed lessons:   1) If given more than 6 hours notice, I will not charge for the lesson.   2) If given less than 6 hours and up until an hour before the lesson, I reserve the right to charge 50% my rate for the lesson length.   3) If given less than an hour, I reserve the right to charge for the entire lesson at the full rate.   Tardiness:    1) If a student is more than 15 minutes late, I will charge for the length of the actual lesson plus a 50% rate for every      minute late to the nearest 5 minute mark.   While I must outline these policies, I am flexible. If a reasonable attempt is made to contact me about missing a lesson or being late, I can't guarantee it, but I usually do not charge.   I am also subject to penalties for tardiness and cancelled lessons.   1) If I am more than 15 minutes... read more

Public school teachers make great tutors. I firmly believe that. It seems though that many people are aghast at the idea that their government licensed, "freely" available teacher should hire him/herself out to the public and dare to charge for their services.  Does the thought of charging for your personal time outside of school hours seem terrible? Is it a violation of our ethics, as servants of the public good, to charge a few ducats for our expertise? True our license is made possible through a compact with state government, but why should that preclude state licensed teachers from engaging in profitable private tutoring? While many, in my experience, would not argue with recompense for after hours tuition, it seems many of those nodding approval take a sideways glance in disdain at the practice, much as one would shout “mercenary” at a government soldier who takes employment in a foreign army.  So, are we guilty of mercenary tactics or do the politics... read more

The tests and scores that can help you gain admission to more selective colleges are changing. I see this as a tutor; though I am not an expert in educational statistics, I cobbled together some data that illustrates current trends. Starting in 1926, the SAT pioneered standardized college admissions tests. It provided valuable objective measures of academic potential. The SAT greatly improved equality in college admissions: in the 1930’s and 1940’s, selective colleges were reluctant to take excellent students from smaller unknown high schools because their risk of failure was higher. The SAT also reduced reliance on interview performance and social connections in admission decisions. Colleges gained experience at balancing test scores and grades with indicators of creativity and unusual achievements. In the 1930’s, about 10% of college-age Americans (about 25% of high school graduates) attended college. Because academic potential, finances, and personal preference... read more

In a previous blog I talked about setting up customized payroll in QuickBooks. At that time I mentioned that in order to complete the process, it was necessary to set up the necessary Payroll Items. QuickBooks uses Items to control how transactions are recorded in the Chart of Accounts, but Payroll Items are a separate menu item under the Lists menu.   The purpose of this blog will not be to discuss the details in setting up Payroll Items. It will be to simply outline this feature of the software. Setting up a Payroll Item is a two-step process. First, the Item must be created in QuickBooks, and second, the Item must be customized so transactions using it are directed to the correct account in the Chart of Accounts. There are six types of Payroll Items using the EZ Setup feature: Compensation (such as wages, salaries, bonuses, and commissions) Insurance Benefits Deductions (such as health, dental & vision insurance, and HSA deductions) Retirement... read more

A couple of weeks ago, my younger daughter came to show me an article her teacher had discussed with them at school. The article was about growth versus fixed mindset and their implication in education. The comparison between these two different concepts showed how someone can change the mind patterns towards one that is capable of anything without limitations! It was such an inspiring and life changing information and it taught both me and my daughter to remember this concept next time we think we are not good at doing something! Carole Dweck, a professor of psychology at Stanford University and one of the world’s leading researchers in the field of motivation describes it in simple words: "In a fixed mindset students believe their basic abilities, their intelligence, their talents, are just fixed traits. They have a certain amount and that's that, and then their goal becomes to look smart all the time and never look dumb. In a growth mindset students understand... read more

Encourage your students to read each passage carefully once.  Then read it again before reading the test question one.  After reading test question one, reread the passage if the answer doesn't come to mind right away.  This reading each passage three times can increase the number of correct answers when trying to get all of the comprehension questions right.

1. When you start “giving” your dreams away for free. 2. When you focused on making the listeners “care” about what I was talking about. 3. When you “truly believed” in what you are sharing with them. I had seen this participant in our meetings many times before? He wears his baseball cap on backwards. His clothes are disheveled and he comes to the meetings often times late. He has given presentations before in our meetings and was an average presenter, saying ordinary things, but today— Today was uncommonly different. Today he looked different. He was dressed in a dark blue suit with no hat, and he delivered a smooth presentation and a content filled with substance. The listeners applauded with vigor and enthusiasm. He did not seem surprised at the response from his audience, but I as his coach certainly was. How did he accomplish this feat? He simply said, “I’ve been listening to what you have been... read more

1. Start adding more value to your present employer. 2. Ask for a promotion only after you’ve given your organization all your ideas for free. A friend of mine wanted to be promoted to a full-time position where she was employed. She asked around her office and found who needed her talents most and where she could be of value most. She did and over approximately five years (doing what she loved, I might add) came up with exciting creative ideas and worked many hours for free. After five years she WAS promoted to a full-time position in the organization she had planned for. Would you work for free for five years to get where you wanted to go? People who want to unentangle would! Keep adding huge value to the world with what you do best, Kerry Wyzant Tutor Career Development

1. In the US, posture is always the quickest movement and most effective way to redirect fear. Hand gestures are the second, such as moving your head, shoulders, arms, hands in a direct yet bold and precise way, which adds importance and clarity to your objectives, plus helps you redirect the immediate fear. 2. Stand up straight Feet should be shoulder width apart Hands by your side Observe your breath Observe the rise and fall of your belly and chest I have coached over 200 people one-on-one over the last year and found most of them are fearful of taking a giant step forward. Many want TO AVOID PAIN. Therefore, they don’t move. Fear is an emotional equivalent of pain. Fear is also a powerful source of energy. My question is how can we use fear as a source of energy towards the things we desire most? Fear of failure AND fear of success is what holds us back from achieving what we truly want. ASK YOURSELF: What must happen... read more

I was going through eight devastating crises all at once in my life. One of them happened to be when my father died and I didn’t have any money to bury him. I had no money and no job. It was a lonely and scary time. I had to use my innate energy differently to change my life and do it fast. MOVE DIFFERENTLY TIPS: 1. MAKE YOUR OWN CAREER. For example: I started a four-week yard sale at my father’s house. Plus, started coaching clients on the art of presentation skills GET ON WITH IT. For example: I needed a lawyer to help me save my father’s house from being sold, I bartered for the service 2. DECIDE WHAT YOUR GOOD AT DOING. For example: To raise money I knew I could sell and communicate effectively, so I started by putting an ad in the local newspaper regarding a “Yard Sale” at my father’s house. Then I worked at selling the items at the sale with the skills of a passionate salesperson. Get up and be first. Don’t eat other people’s dust!   Keep... read more

One of the biggest challenges that nursing students face today is keeping up with all of the machines, paperwork and technology, while at the same time trying to provide excellent bedside care. Some hospitals, sadly, seem to place more emphasis  on the former. They continue to increase the nurse/patient ratio, adding more paperwork to fill out and more technology to manage. How can a new nursing student excel in this environment? Does he or she simply 'go with the flow' when they have very little time left to spend with the patient? Or does he or she try to find the delicate balance between bureaucracy and caring for a priceless human being?   I believe the answer is both: As a professional nurse, it is your duty to complete all of the paperwork required by the facility; you must know how to effectively operate all of the machinery needed to care for the patient, but, you must constantly remind yourself that the most important... read more

Math Student's Civil Rights   I have the right to learn Math (Math is learnable like other subjects) I have a right to make mistakes, erase then, and try again (Failure points to what I have not learned yet) I have the right to ask for help (asking for help is a great decision) I have the right to ask questions when I don't understand (understanding is the primary goal) I have the right to ask questions until I understand (perseverance is priceless) I have the right to receive help and not feel stupid for receiving it (asking for help is natural) I have the right to not like some math concepts or disciplines (i.e. trigonometry, statistics, differential equations, etc.) I have the right to define success as learning no matter how I feel about Math or supporters I have the right to reduce negative self-talk & feelings I have the right to be treated as a person capable of learning I have the right to assess a helper's ability to... read more

Tutoring is always fun when the student gets to make activity choices as we go along. I make tutoring fun by planning activities that strengthen the Reader and that makes them interested. Tutoring is fun with social praise and teacher input that motivates them. Tutoring sessions are fun when you know the student wants the end of session token reinforcement. Tutoring can be even more fun if you have some surprise end of session token reinforcement, like candy or small prizes that go with the holiday season or with the mastering of a certain goal at the end of a school year.

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