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From my experience, designing a lesson for one student could be challenging due to not being able to include group or pair-work, which is not only a great way for the students to apply what they have just learned with a fellow classmate allowing them to feel more comfortable to make mistakes but also gives the teacher the opportunity to walk around and listen in and find common errors that can be brought up to the class as a whole instead of singling out a single student's mistake possibly discouraging them, but also because after some time the student can easily get bored deterring them from fully learning the material the tutor is teaching. Here are five things I include in each lesson to ensure that the student is actively learning and having a fun time doing so as well.   1) Make your first lesson informal so they feel comfortable with you from the get-go. They will be hesitant until they feel it is okay to mistakes and the sooner you can get them to let their guard... read more

  I used to teach engineers how to write. I loved it, but it was challenge; engineers are infamous for arguing a point into the ground. Whenever I taught them Plain Language and urged them to use it, the hair would bristle on the backs of their necks. Generally, the course of events to follow went something like this. They say: • Using Plain Language would be writing down to their readers • Making their writing understandable wasn’t necessary, because their audiences already understood the subject matter • Writing technical documents has always been done this way • This wasn’t the way they were taught to write After which, I stand in front of them. I look at them. I finally speak. I say, “Your teachers were wrong.” And, just short of rending of garments and gnashing of teeth, all hell breaks loose. (Did I mention that engineers love to argue?) Nevertheless, I continue. “It’s all because of a bunch of ancient Roman rhetoricians... read more

We all know we do better when we're well-rested than when we're not. Modern sleep research has started to uncover exactly why that's the case. In terms of memory, there are at least two important reasons to make sure you're getting enough sleep. First, we better remember what we learned the day before. This is because sleep plays an essential role in the conversion of short-term memory to long-term memory. Short-term memory relies heavily on a brain region known as the hippocampus (named after the Greek word for seahorse, given its shape), while long-term memory relies on a broad network of cortical association areas. When we learn new information, the hippocampus is very active, and when we sleep, it turns out that the activity of our hippocampus predicts how well we will remember what we learned when we wake up. Researchers have even found interesting ways to manipulate and improve this process. For example, in one study, experimenters paired the scent of a rose with a spatial... read more

In my experience with elementary level students, I am constantly amazed by these kids imagination. However when it comes to math i find myself frustrated that their minds wander so much. Sometimes i want to just be like, "Super man and unicorns are not a part of math! pay attention!!!!" Reality is, that just doesn't help. I began trying to revamp my ways of teaching so that super man could join us in our lessons. I found that using examples that incorporate the child's imagination works wonders. They being to laugh and enjoy themselves when I am tutoring them and the best part is....THEY PAY ATTENTION! The fun examples also help them to remember math concepts when they go to take their tests. It is a win win for everyone. A basic example could be "superman already saved 4 people last week but this week he saved 5 more people from a burning building! So how many people has he saved?" We have taken a basic 4+5=9 math problem and made it fun for them. Sometimes... read more

I started my Physics course this Summer telling my students they are not allowed to say "I don't know," unless they can't read, listen to a recording, watch a video, or ask a question of someone more knowledgeable. When I was in school we did not have access to information like students do today.  In my humble opinion, students need to bulk up on two things like body builders do using supplements. What are those two things students need to bulk up with? Asking quality questions and learning how they learn.  Take for example, Google is an awesome resource, but if you ask the wrong question or use terms inappropriately, you will not get the answer you seek. Ask a bad question one gets a bad answer. Ask a wrong question one gets a wrong answer. Ask an incomplete question one may very well get an incomplete answer. Its that simple. Quality of questions is paramount and good questions come from meticulous vocabulary management. Therefore, students must become... read more

Consider reducing a matrix to row-echelon form. Pretend we have a pivot (the entry we want to set to 1) equal to 3 and another entry in the same column with an entry equal to 5. We can make the pivot equal to 1 by multiplying every entry in its row by 1/3. But the result is that the problem with the other rows explode into a mess of fractions. Most people accept that and continue working with fractions throughout the entire process. A simple way to prevent the fraction problem is to replace the row containing the pivot with itself multiplied by 3 and subtract it from the row with a 5 in its column, multiplied by 2. This gives 10-9=1 for the pivot and it is a perfectly legal operation as long as we set the pivot row as a linear combination of itself and any other row.

Recently, I've noticed other tutors asking questions about raising rates and client retention.  Professional tutors learn how to provide this educational service and negotiate payment for services rendered.  This website is great for providing leads and helping a new tutor get started.  Attaining a level of education and specific tutor training will help beginners become effective professionals, not simply peer tutors with high GPAs.  Successfully tutoring others who achieve high marks on writing assignments and exams takes preparation and time.  This job requires more than just one hour with a student.   When I first started tutoring I did not calculate all of my travel expenses, including my time, into my hourly rate. As I quickly gained experience, I began to realize that my clients appreciate and value my willingness to drive to their homes once or twice a week.  Then gas prices began to slowly rise and I had another epiphany.  My... read more

i have just finished my Spacialist degree in education in Technology. I am also Microsoft certified teacher. I am convinced that education nowadays should be more practical than just memorizing. Technology has open doors to A new way of teaching. I am innovative. Creative. And that's the perfect balance to this job. I love to teach!  

Students are often frustrated when trying to learn a foreign language because they can't organize the material like they are used to doing in other subjects.  Language is fluid and we are able to finally understand foreign words when we let go and allow the right side of our brains to take over.  Much of understanding is intuitive and contextual, so give yourself permission to guess what is being said or written.  The key is to think through the words and let them come alive in your brain, so you can use them later.  That's how you learned your native tongue.  Grammar should be a supplement to your language acquisition, not the main player.  I always recommend online courses with pictures, sound and familiar scenes between actors...like a play on stage, but in German.   You know the German word Kindergarten because you have heard it so many times in the context of your life.  That is how you can learn new German words....find a program... read more

You won't pass the exam because you are listening to people who took the exam 5,6 or even 20 years ago. The advice most of my students get is "just take a lot of questions,don't read the book" That is a sure way to fail,yes there are some people who can just take a lot of questions and "game" the exam but they are the ones you were always envious of in school, they looked like they weren't trying and still aced the exams. Almost every single student of mine says that is the advice they get from their supervisors. I have even heard of a few getting yelled at because they were reading the book. Some of those people took the exam in the 90s,when the exam questions were drastically different and the Vendors were actually helping write the questions on the exam. FINRA (formerly NASD) ended that practice a long time ago and there may have been some lingering questions from the "good ole days" they are pretty much gone now. This is not your father's... read more

Tutoring is a two way street. Both sides of the party need to put in 110% of effort in order to see positive results.   A tutor needs to be enthusiastic about the subject. They need to be passionate about what they are teaching. Throughout my college career, I had a better experience and better results in classes where my professor was enthusiastic about the class. Adversely, teachers who don't show enthusiasm, do not connect with the students, and the students refuse to create that connection as well.    Another healthy tutoring tip is patience. Nobody likes a pushy tutor! Yes, be assertive, but being too pushy will annoy the student. Patience allows the student to digest the material and to create cognitive connections.   Positive encouragement is also a good way to make lessons fun. There are teachers who scare their students by giving them discouragement. When a teacher gives the student positive encouragement, the student feels good... read more

Greetings everyone! My name is Devron. I'm a math tutor from New Orleans, but I've recently moved to Nashville, TN. I have to say math has always been a passion of mine, but admittedly, it wasn't always my favorite subject. During my middle school years, I was always ok, but not great. Nothing special about the subject jumped out to me. Math was just numbers that I saw no special value in. It wasn't until I made to transition to high school that I started seeing the light. I started my freshman year at a school in New Orleans. There I studied Geometry. The subject was fun because I was able to learn about shapes and angles and understand the relation that they played in everyday life. Hurricane Katrina struck a year later so I found myself changing schools. I finished the rest of my school years at East St. John High School in Reserve, LA. There, I was behind in some of my subjects, including math, because school had already started for the students. I was taking Algebra II at the... read more

I truly loved teaching high school English, and it thrilled me to see my students have so much fun in my classes. We laughed a lot, which I think is important, because when students are enjoying themselves in the learning process, it makes it so much easier to learn. That is why I feel it is so important to build an easy rapport with students in the beginning, making the student feel at ease, and comfortable, putting the student in a position in which he or she feels comfortable asking questions, for example, and getting a complete understanding of the material at hand. I enjoy tutoring because it gives me the opportunity to teach in a one-on-one situation, focusing my attention on one willing student, and helping that student to achieve his or her goal. I enjoy building a student's confidence, and sharing the joy that comes with improvement. I tutor in my own home, though some students prefer to do some of their work on-line or by phone. This is fine; I have instructed this way with... read more

1-4-2015 Happy New Year! As I begin this New Year, I am pondering what this year will bring. So I asked myself several questions: 1) How can I maximize my efficiency so my students get the maximum benefit? 2) How can I streamline the process of learning so the learning curve is greatly reduced? 3) How can I increase my communication efficiency so that my students not only grasp a concept, but retain the knowledge and put it into practice immediately. These are questions that demand answers. As anyone who examines my profile can attest, my main focus is on teaching the ASVAB test. A majority of my students have successfully passed my course and successfully passed the ASVAB test and are now in the military. Getting these students to pass the ASVAB is a daunting task. Why? well to begin with much of the prior learning that they (should) have attained has been forgotten by the time they come to the test. The most common... read more

          When planning to train for any kind of test preparation, most people assume that the best strategy is to gradually schedule more frequent tutoring as they get closer to the test date. This makes no sense. Think of the mind like a muscle. In this analogy, the first few weeks of training are slowly more strenuous, it's true. However, once you have built the foundation of skill, it's a matter of practice to increase ability in existing skill. Practice only makes perfect if you have that foundation. Otherwise, you are simply practicing your mistakes. As with any marathon, you want to perfect your skill, practice like crazy to build stamina, and then back off as you get closer to the event to ensure you are rested and ready.           Test prep works in exactly the same way. Instead of cramming before the test, leaving yourself wired and tired, distracted and unable to focus, the best... read more

It's not controversial to aver that procrastination is bad. Most would agree without giving it a second thought. But what about procrastination is so harmful, and why do we procrastinate when we readily agree we shouldn't? When I talk about procrastination, I'm talking about delaying an important task despite knowing we will suffer as a result. Why would we do this? The problem seems to have its roots in an inability to manage emotions, and from an overweighting of short-term benefits over long-term costs. In a landmark 1997 study, Dianne Tice and Roy Baumeister rated college students on an established scale of procrastination, then tracked their academic performance, stress, and general health throughout the semester. Initially the procrastinators reported lower levels of stress, presumably because they were enjoying more pleasurable activities in lieu of the work they should have been doing. By the end of the semester, however, the procrastinators earned lower... read more

All cancellations and rescheduling must be made in writing (through WyzAnt messaging) at least 36 hours prior to the lesson start time.   If the lesson is rescheduled with notice more than 36 hours in advance of the lesson start time, no fee is assessed. If the lesson is rescheduled with notice less than 36 hours, a $10 fee may be assessed.   Note: While I can usually find a time to reschedule, it is not always possible. In those cases, it will be considered a cancellation. If the lesson is cancelled with no plan to reschedule, a $15 fee is assessed. For no-shows, a cancellation fee equal to the full amount of the lesson is assessed. A student will be considered a no-show if they are more than 15 minutes late. In the case of documented emergencies or extreme illness, exceptions can be made at my discretion.   Lessons will be charged according to their scheduled beginning and end times, regardless of whether a... read more

You might wonder what emotion has to do with learning, and why I am writing a blog about sleep and emotion. If you think about it, though, how you to react challenging situations - the emotions you feel, and the cognitions, physiology, and behaviors that accompany them - can have a profound impact on how you learn. Indeed, emotional reactivity can have a profound impact in multiple domains, but in this blog we will focus on its impact on learning. Modern neuroscience is not necessary to understand that sleep is fundamentally important. However, it increasingly allows us to understand why that is the case. Andrea Goldstein and Matt Walker reviewed the literature on sleep and emotion and make a compelling case for the causal role of sleep in optimal affective brain function. For our purposes, I want to focus on the overarching theme of how sleep deprivation diminishes effective emotional reactivity. When people are sleep deprived for even one night, functional... read more

The Economist recently published an article with some surprising research findings about stress. Contrary to popular belief, stress is not always bad, nor is it the amount of stress that matters. Rather, the key determinant of its impact on performance and health is largely psychological.    In one study, researchers divided a set of GRE test takers into two groups. Saliva samples were taken to establish baseline stress levels for all participants. Then one group was told that stress during practice exams is natural and can improve performance, while the other group just took the test. Saliva samples were taken at the end of the exam, and the results from both groups indicated similar levels of stress. BUT, the group that had learned stress can be helpful scored higher on the practice test (and, several months later, on the actual GRE) than those who just took the test.    Even more impressively, in 2012 a group of researchers scoured through... read more

At a conference in town earlier this year, I presented several panel discussions centering around the difficulty of defining and quantifying art. Our discussions in these panels got me thinking about literature, and how one of my main points could apply equally easily to much of the literature that students read in high school. The point in question is this: one of the defining characteristics of art, in my view, is that it is something that creates an emotional response in the viewer. Experiencing it changes you in some way. This is easy to see when the emotions are ones we generally see as 'positive;' if a play makes your heart swell with hope for the future, or a ballet duet makes you flush with the excitement of new love, or an epic novel makes your heart race with anxiety over the safety of the main characters, it's easy to argue that those works are art and have changed you. But what if the emotions you experience are more negative – what if a novel bores you, frustrates... read more

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