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Hi Guys,  I'm new to Wyzant, so I thought I'd give a quick python demo..Diving right in..    Python is an object oriented (OO) language however doesn't enforce this paradigm... Pop open a terminal/shell and type the word python..     Users/Mike$ python  <enter>  C:/  Python <enter>   >>> # If python is installed you will see three angle brackets like so... You're can now simply start writing python code..  >>> # This is a comment in python  -->prefixed by hashtag or the pound symbol   >>>  >>> x = 5    >>>x  5    >>> x + 2  7    >>> x * 2  10    >>> x ** 2   # x squared   25    >>> x / 2    # python 2.x  --> 3 .  python 3.x  --... read more

Math Student's Civil Rights   I have the right to learn Math (Math is learnable like other subjects) I have a right to make mistakes, erase then, and try again (Failure points to what I have not learned yet) I have the right to ask for help (asking for help is a great decision) I have the right to ask questions when I don't understand (understanding is the primary goal) I have the right to ask questions until I understand (perseverance is priceless) I have the right to receive help and not feel stupid for receiving it (asking for help is natural) I have the right to not like some math concepts or disciplines (i.e. trigonometry, statistics, differential equations, etc.) I have the right to define success as learning no matter how I feel about Math or supporters I have the right to reduce negative self-talk & feelings I have the right to be treated as a person capable of learning I have the right to assess a helper's ability to... read more

In a recent front page Chicago Tribune article (May 21, 2017), “Are college prep classes failing to prepare kids?,” investigators examined the relationship between high school class rigor and preparation for college, based upon ACT scores. They found startling differences between students taking only mainstream (“college-prep”) courses and students taking AP and honors courses, often 8-10 point differences in math scores on the ACT, 25 v. 33 for example, at several high schools. A more compelling analysis would have explored the relationship between high school class rigor and success in college, including persistence to graduation. Nevertheless, there is undoubtedly some correlation between class rigor in high school and college success, partly because of the skills and knowledge students acquire in AP classes, partly because AP classes attract more highly motivated students who will work extra hard to succeed in college. What I have learned first-hand from tutoring... read more

Description The introductory paragraph of a paper or writing should capture the reader’s attention and engage their mind. You should always approach your papers expecting a reluctant or busy reader. Your job is to relate to them, give them useful information, and intrigue them to capture their interest. The first sentence of an introduction can be thought of as “the hook:” The sentence that grabs the mind of your reader. Approach Ask yourself: Who is reading this paper (your audience)? Is my reader sympathetic or opposed to my view? What personal experiences or interests will my reader have? How can I relate to the topics or things that my reader would care about? What was the most interesting or unexpected fact that I learned? Tone of Paper The tone of your paper should determine the hook sentence that you use For creative writing, you have more flexibility For informative writings, the tone may limit the options you have   Devices Creative... read more

Have you ever received a graded essay handed back with the phrase, "Needs more structure," or "structure needs work?"   Creating a structure for any written word, whether it is poem, essay, news brief, or novel, is an integral part of the message you intend to convey. Using long, convoluted sentences as means to convince the reader that your argument is very simple will usually only give the opposite impression; simple arguments are best conveyed with short, simple sentences. (For example, the opposite is true in Jonathan Swift's essay, "A Modest Proposal," in which he uses didactic and complex language in an effort to "convince" the people of England that the solution to their hunger and poverty problem is to eat their starving infant children; his complex sentences reflect the sarcastic and satiric nature of his essay, reflecting that he does not see cannibalism as a real solution.)   Structure also helps you keep... read more

All cancellations and rescheduling must be made in writing (through WyzAnt messaging) at least 36 hours prior to the lesson start time.   If the lesson is rescheduled with notice more than 36 hours in advance of the lesson start time, no fee is assessed. If the lesson is rescheduled with notice less than 36 hours, a $10 fee may be assessed.   Note: While I can usually find a time to reschedule, it is not always possible. In those cases, it will be considered a cancellation. If the lesson is cancelled with no plan to reschedule, a $15 fee is assessed. For no-shows, a cancellation fee equal to the full amount of the lesson is assessed. A student will be considered a no-show if they are more than 15 minutes late. In the case of documented emergencies or extreme illness, exceptions can be made at my discretion.   Lessons will be charged according to their scheduled beginning and end times, regardless of whether a... read more

You might wonder what emotion has to do with learning, and why I am writing a blog about sleep and emotion. If you think about it, though, how you to react challenging situations - the emotions you feel, and the cognitions, physiology, and behaviors that accompany them - can have a profound impact on how you learn. Indeed, emotional reactivity can have a profound impact in multiple domains, but in this blog we will focus on its impact on learning. Modern neuroscience is not necessary to understand that sleep is fundamentally important. However, it increasingly allows us to understand why that is the case. Andrea Goldstein and Matt Walker reviewed the literature on sleep and emotion and make a compelling case for the causal role of sleep in optimal affective brain function. For our purposes, I want to focus on the overarching theme of how sleep deprivation diminishes effective emotional reactivity. When people are sleep deprived for even one night, functional... read more

To my fellow educators and students,   I know that it is very tempting to give your students answers to their questions immediately, but sometimes it's best to let a student struggle a little. Asking students why they are doing what they are doing can help students to make lasting connections that go beyond that next test or ACT exam. This approach can be frustrating for both teachers and students at times, but it is quite rewarding.   I have a student who was completely scared about sharing their opinion on an answer they gave. Throughout most of the lesson i refused to give them a yea or nay answer. I asked them to talk it out and see if they could understand why they did what they did. The student was correct, but having students explain their answer and even get frustrated with me some helped this student achieve deeper understanding of the material. 

I specialize in teaching essay structure and style. When I began tutoring, I had a vague idea that I'd work with college students like the friends for whom I'd proofread during university: young Americans who've grown up in a public school system which emphasized group work over individual learning, and who therefore never got a chance to develop their writing skills. I've certainly worked with students from a background very much like this. However, I've also had the pleasure of building a strong ESL clientele. At this point, I've spent enough time with ESL students to have made some observations about the nature of ESL learning and the way it is discussed. I'm certainly no expert, but by now I am a reliable dilettante. I speak with the authority of firsthand experience. From that vantage, I'd like to address one mistake which is frequently made in conversations about ESL learning. It is a very serious mistake and I have to believe that it muddles teachers' thinking considerably... read more

I started my Physics course this Summer telling my students they are not allowed to say "I don't know," unless they can't read, listen to a recording, watch a video, or ask a question of someone more knowledgeable. When I was in school we did not have access to information like students do today.  In my humble opinion, students need to bulk up on two things like body builders do using supplements. What are those two things students need to bulk up with? Asking quality questions and learning how they learn.  Take for example, Google is an awesome resource, but if you ask the wrong question or use terms inappropriately, you will not get the answer you seek. Ask a bad question one gets a bad answer. Ask a wrong question one gets a wrong answer. Ask an incomplete question one may very well get an incomplete answer. Its that simple. Quality of questions is paramount and good questions come from meticulous vocabulary management. Therefore, students must become... read more

Greetings everyone! My name is Devron. I'm a math tutor from New Orleans, but I've recently moved to Nashville, TN. I have to say math has always been a passion of mine, but admittedly, it wasn't always my favorite subject. During my middle school years, I was always ok, but not great. Nothing special about the subject jumped out to me. Math was just numbers that I saw no special value in. It wasn't until I made to transition to high school that I started seeing the light. I started my freshman year at a school in New Orleans. There I studied Geometry. The subject was fun because I was able to learn about shapes and angles and understand the relation that they played in everyday life. Hurricane Katrina struck a year later so I found myself changing schools. I finished the rest of my school years at East St. John High School in Reserve, LA. There, I was behind in some of my subjects, including math, because school had already started for the students. I was taking Algebra II at the... read more

You won't pass the exam because you are listening to people who took the exam 5,6 or even 20 years ago. The advice most of my students get is "just take a lot of questions,don't read the book" That is a sure way to fail,yes there are some people who can just take a lot of questions and "game" the exam but they are the ones you were always envious of in school, they looked like they weren't trying and still aced the exams. Almost every single student of mine says that is the advice they get from their supervisors. I have even heard of a few getting yelled at because they were reading the book. Some of those people took the exam in the 90s,when the exam questions were drastically different and the Vendors were actually helping write the questions on the exam. FINRA (formerly NASD) ended that practice a long time ago and there may have been some lingering questions from the "good ole days" they are pretty much gone now. This is not your father's... read more

From my experience, designing a lesson for one student could be challenging due to not being able to include group or pair-work, which is not only a great way for the students to apply what they have just learned with a fellow classmate allowing them to feel more comfortable to make mistakes but also gives the teacher the opportunity to walk around and listen in and find common errors that can be brought up to the class as a whole instead of singling out a single student's mistake possibly discouraging them, but also because after some time the student can easily get bored deterring them from fully learning the material the tutor is teaching. Here are five things I include in each lesson to ensure that the student is actively learning and having a fun time doing so as well.   1) Make your first lesson informal so they feel comfortable with you from the get-go. They will be hesitant until they feel it is okay to mistakes and the sooner you can get them to let their guard... read more

Everyone has their own approach to writing. Some writers are very methodical throughout the entire writing process while others write freely and revise their way to the final draft. For proposals and admissions essays, a structured writing process draws from the strengths of both approaches. It starts with a creative focus and concludes with deliberate writing and revision. First, with the requirements and prompt in mind, the writer lets him or herself write and think freely. Second, the writer reviews his or her own notes and ideas to identify a cohesive focal point. Next, the writer distills the ideas into a concrete thesis and engages peers, friends, family, and instructors to develop and strengthen the arguments. Finally, the writer lays out the elements that support the thesis and backs it with specific examples or anecdotes. Creative Stage. In this stage, the writer thinks and writes freely but not chaotically. It starts with a careful review of the requirements laid... read more

I'm always a fan of more information rather than less. I do well tutoring both cost and financial accounting. Some tutors don't and they know it. If we qualify for these topics separately, we don't have to answer inquiries with, "Yes, I know one but not the other." That kind of clarity in place of wasted communications always benefits tutors. It also very much benefits students. When you increase clarity for both tutors and students, you save selection time and provide the best fit, which is the overriding goal. The best fit is always the better outcome because it makes for happier students and better ratings for the tutor.

Students are often frustrated when trying to learn a foreign language because they can't organize the material like they are used to doing in other subjects.  Language is fluid and we are able to finally understand foreign words when we let go and allow the right side of our brains to take over.  Much of understanding is intuitive and contextual, so give yourself permission to guess what is being said or written.  The key is to think through the words and let them come alive in your brain, so you can use them later.  That's how you learned your native tongue.  Grammar should be a supplement to your language acquisition, not the main player.  I always recommend online courses with pictures, sound and familiar scenes between actors...like a play on stage, but in German.   You know the German word Kindergarten because you have heard it so many times in the context of your life.  That is how you can learn new German words....find a program... read more

The reconciliation feature in QuickBooks is a very powerful tool, but my experience has been that the majority of users aren't utilizing its features effectively. In addition, the most common usage of this feature is to reconcile bank statements, but it can also be used to reconcile other accounts as well. Starting a reconciliation is relatively easy, but the reconciliation window that appears after you click on Continue has some features that may not be all that obvious. The first feature is the fact that every column in the reconciliation window can be sorted simply by clicking once on the column heading. If you want the sort in reverse order, click on the column heading a second time. This is especially useful if the bank statement lists cleared checks separately from all other transactions. Click on the Ref# column so the transactions are listed by number and reconcile those. Then click on the Date column so that the entries match the rest of the transactions listed... read more

Online tutoring is definitely a great thing not only to take, but to teach. It allows you to be flexible with your schedule, you don't have to leave your home, and you save money on gas! However, there can be some downsides to online tutoring.  If you live with family, there can be distractions and background noise You may not be technologically savvy You may find some students would prefer tutoring in a face-to-face setting Even despite these setbacks, WyzAnt's online tutoring platform is an amazing way to interact with students. Here are some solutions to these issues: Make sure you have a designated "tutoring room" or quiet time during tutoring hours. Living with family, especially children, can be difficult. However, letting others know that you need silence, or having a designated room where there is little to no family traffic can help improve the quality of the session. Even if you are not technologically savvy, WyzAnt offers a... read more

Many people think of tutoring as a remedial endeavor, but that really isn't the right way to think about it. The fact of the matter is that classroom instruction can never be tailored to individual students, which means that learning is rarely optimal. By necessity, teachers must teach to the middle of the class. The teacher's pace, style, and goals are geared to the class as a whole, not specific students. With private tutoring, on the other hand, lessons can be specifically tailored to the individual student. For students who plan to take the ISEE or SSAT - tests that inevitably include material students have never encountered before - starting early is important. The goal of enrichment tutoring is to ensure students have a strong foundation in the core knowledge areas that will determine how they do on these tests.  When a student is not excelling in a core subject, it is often because the class is moving too quickly, the teacher's style is out of sync with the... read more

At a conference in town earlier this year, I presented several panel discussions centering around the difficulty of defining and quantifying art. Our discussions in these panels got me thinking about literature, and how one of my main points could apply equally easily to much of the literature that students read in high school. The point in question is this: one of the defining characteristics of art, in my view, is that it is something that creates an emotional response in the viewer. Experiencing it changes you in some way. This is easy to see when the emotions are ones we generally see as 'positive;' if a play makes your heart swell with hope for the future, or a ballet duet makes you flush with the excitement of new love, or an epic novel makes your heart race with anxiety over the safety of the main characters, it's easy to argue that those works are art and have changed you. But what if the emotions you experience are more negative – what if a novel bores you, frustrates... read more

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