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In anatomy there are often several long processes. The processes can often times be very difficult to remember. One way to remember the processes is to make funny sentences that use the first letter of each word of the process. For example blood flow through the renal would be renal artery, small artery, afferent artriole, Glomereulus, epherent artriole, peritubule capillaries, small veins, renal vein. This could be remembered by Ryan Should Ask Genys Elephant "Please Say Rymes". This one of the tools I enjoy using to help others learn.

Our understanding of the relationship between memory and learning continues to improve. Why not benefit from the latest research by incorporating some of these findings into your own study habits? I help my students come up with creative ways to do this all the time, and wanted to share one of the more helpful summaries I've come across about what works and what doesn't.    Here are a few highlights: Link new information to things you already know Actively participate in your own learning Create both a visual and a verbal memory for the same information Whenever possible, study in an environment that is similar to the testing environment Spread studying out over several days, rather than cramming Avoid multitasking when learning difficult or dense material Review information you're trying to memorize right before you go to sleep Quiz yourself frequently to practice retrieving these memories, making them stronger in the process   You... read more

Steps to Developing Effective Study Skills Step 1: Assessing Your Learning Style Step 2: Knowing Your Interests Step 3: Developing Appropriate Tools to Enhance Studying Step 4: Making the Subject Work for You (even if you hate it or don’t get it) Step 5: Constructing a Learning-Style-Friendly Environment Step 6: Other Considerations in Developing Effective Study Skills When we sit down to study, most of us follow a routine. We get our books together, get comfy (at a desk, on the bed, sitting on the floor, etc.), and set to work. Some of us turn on the TV or some music; others of us make our environment as quiet as it can be. What we do to study varies, but generally we reread our notes, textbooks, or study guides, and call it a day. The day of the test, we struggle to recall what we studied. Afterwards, we admonish ourselves for not studying hard enough or long enough, and doubt our performance. Does this sound familiar? It doesn’t need to be this way. Effective... read more

I specialize in teaching essay structure and style. When I began tutoring, I had a vague idea that I'd work with college students like the friends for whom I'd proofread during university: young Americans who've grown up in a public school system which emphasized group work over individual learning, and who therefore never got a chance to develop their writing skills. I've certainly worked with students from a background very much like this. However, I've also had the pleasure of building a strong ESL clientele. At this point, I've spent enough time with ESL students to have made some observations about the nature of ESL learning and the way it is discussed. I'm certainly no expert, but by now I am a reliable dilettante. I speak with the authority of firsthand experience. From that vantage, I'd like to address one mistake which is frequently made in conversations about ESL learning. It is a very serious mistake and I have to believe that it muddles teachers' thinking considerably... read more

Tutoring is fulfilling as you see and hear student say "I get it" with a laughter.  There are times when you ask is tutoring the answer for the individual as what emerges is an important question  "the challenge of a bright student". 

Tutoring is fulfilling as you see and hear student say "I get it" with a laughter.  There are times when you ask is tutoring the answer for the individual as what emerges is an important question  "the challenge of a bright student". 

Last week in my Literature Spotlight, I discussed the idea of science-fiction as a reflection of the time period in which it was written. For this week's Writing Rundown, let's take a look at my brainstorming process. As I mentioned in this blog post, there are many ways to brainstorm for a project. For this one, I decided to use a technique I hardly ever use myself: free-writing. Free-writing is a great tool for projects for which you have the beginnings of a lot of ideas bouncing around in your head, but none are quite fleshed out enough for you to contemplate their connections. It generally requires another form of prewriting such as a word cloud or outline to get it into a state that helps you write the essay, but it's a great place to start. So, as a brief recap: in freewriting, sometimes called “stream-of-consciousness” writing, you put your pen down on a blank piece of paper and just start writing – and you don't stop writing for at least ten or fifteen... read more

Games are a great way to make use of the language, especially for beginners, regardless of age! It's something I try to do at the end of each lesson, the last 10 to 15 minutes of the lesson.   Hangman - really gets beginners practicing to say the letters Cheese Dip - perfect for the younger ones, they will love to practice spelling words with those cheese letters and mice Go Fish - practice using tener, numbers and colors Guess Who - students practice describing using the verbs ser and tener and colors, body parts, and food Operation - practice body parts, the verbs doler, tiene dolor, el dolor esta... plus of course body parts and also use of estar Hedbanz - practice using ser, tener, estar, plus a wider ray of descriptions than "Guess Who" since there is more of a variety of objects, indoor items, outdoor tools, animals, vehicles etc. Would You Rather? - can be used to simply describe the ridiculous things happening or for more advanced... read more

I have edited 3 magazines intermittently from 1972. At present I am assistant editor for an on-line magazine coming out of London, England. I published my home study piano course in 1991 that has an enrollment of 200 students. I have one book now at the publishers and hopefully another should be ready for publication in the New Year.

Story of one of my ACT students Amazing!  one of my Student’s ACT test score bumped up by 4 points in ACT test! I tutored this student during summer and he got improved by 4 points in ACT test. Previously, student’s ACT score was 24. I tutored this student during summer time. During tutoring, Student and I (the tutor)-we both were consistent and committed to reach the goal. I tutored to help him to achieve his dreamed higher score. After all the hard work of two months of summer, finally, this student reached his goal.  It took a lot of effort to produce the results. At the end, everything including commitment, consistency and hard-work got paid off when the student’s scores got improved by 4 points, and met its goal.    

1. There are no wrong answers, judgement is OUT the window in my class.   It is only wrong if you do not participate in the discussion because anything "we" say is all of value.   2. Multiple avenues are used to give the best tutoring experience possible-and humor!   3. Make every lesson different, yet challenging   4. Understand what way your student(s) learn best. Use the tools they are comfy with, and the tutor needs to adapt.   5. The best tutors are students as well as educators. They have a thirst for knowledge and are willing to learn together with the student, not lecture the student. Good tutors positively engage and do not criticize in any form.   ♠♣♥♥♥♥ß¾ƒ∑©™®-Study, learn, and have fun while doing it!

A few good questions and thoughtful answers can make tutoring an actual learning process. This is substantially different from cramming sessions, emergency sessions to pass a class and homework 'completion'. I ask parents and students (where it is age/capacity appropriate) to explain their goals and expected outcomes. This question serves three significant purposes for the student and myself. (1) Is the student interested in learning or in getting by? (2) Does the student have commitment/perseverance or are they looking for an easy out? (3) Setting realistic expectations for outcomes. If the student is not interested in learning and will not be committed, I am not the correct tutor for the job. There are tutors who specialize in cram sessions. Setting expectations appropriately prevents surprises from happening to ardent wishes. An example of expectation setting is explaining to parents the following examples and being clear on this information: (http://talk... read more

Most language learning resources focus on the process of what YOU can do to learn a language. But what I'm interested in is how a language is an organic, living, naturally occurring phenomenon, like rivers, trees, and humans, and what that has to do with efficient language learning, as well as what it has to do with the nature of life/God/the universe (as a bonus). The mathematician Leonardo Fibonacci used a set of numbers (Fibonacci numbers) to describe how rabbit populations expand. The numbers are 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, 34, ... (each number is the sum of the previous two numbers). This "golden" ratio also describes flowers, trees, rivers, seashells, galaxies, and the human face. Language also grows this way in your mind -- particularly if you're a child. My goal is that it grow that way also in the mind of the adult. The way it looks is that for every language you grew up speaking there are a number of situations you've experienced in... read more

Sophomore year of high school, I struggled with my General Chemistry course. My parents insisted that I get tutoring help. During my tutoring sessions, I was able to ask questions that I felt shy asking in class. As I mastered basic concepts, studying became increasingly enjoyable. My tutor's support allowed me to gain confidence when approaching new topics and tenacity when solving complex problems. I took AP Chemistry my Junior year, earned a 5 on the AP exam, and a perfect 800 on the Chemistry SAT. I want to be a tutor in order to inspire high school students, especially those who are struggling with chemistry, biology, and mathematics classes; all students have the potential to succeed in these challenging subjects. It's just a matter of putting in a consistent effort with the proper guidance, and I feel privileged to be a tutor who can offer such support. I obtained a Bachelor of Science degree from UC Davis in 2006 with a Departmental Honor Award and a Dean's List distinction... read more

I have taught SAT/ACT prep in the public school system for many years.  On the first day, I ask my students to flip their book over and read the quote that says, "The SAT is not designed to trick you!"  I then have them circle that quote and write "LIE!" next to it.  College Boards are as much about successful test taking skills, as they are about knowledge.  There are so many simple strategies that can easily improve scores by 100 points.    One concept I emphasize is skipping questions.  I had a student's score go up by over 100 points, simply by answering less questions!    You don't have to be an English star to do well on College Boards.  With practice, knowledge, and the right test-taking skills, you can walk in on test day confident, and emerge successful!

WyzAnt allows you to use their custom-built tutoring platform for online lessons. I have found this far superior to Skype, and comparable to many commercial, expensive web meeting platforms, and it's specifically designed for tutoring. While there are many features, and WyzAnt's materials cover them extensively, I want to point out something I've used that has greatly benefited my own use and, I hope, the experience of my students.    I own a Wacom Intuos graphics tablet, which I bought to annotate screencasts for a statistics app that I'm developing. A use case I didn't intend was online tutoring. WyzAnt's platform has a whiteboard with the ability to create objects, drop in files, add text, even Wolfram|Alpha output, to a screen both parties can see. However, the freehand drawing function looks very ugly if used with a mouse: it resembles a child's chicken scratch. Not exactly the professional look you want as a tutor.    Using a graphics tablet... read more

Hello NCLEX Takers, I am tutor here on WyzAnt that specializes in NCLEX prep work.  It is my passion and absolute focus.  My students fair very well after working with me and my system of addressing this exam.  If you are looking for some answers about how to address the exam and prepare please read through this e-mail and reach out to me at my personal site at https://www.wyzant.com/Tutors/NCLEXPREP   Here are some questions to help me address your needs: 1) How many times have you taken the NCLEX? 2) What nursing school did you go to? 3) How many questions have you gotten on your exam or exams? 4) Do you have an idea of when you would like to take the NCLEX? 5) Where I believe you to be at in your ability to take the NCLEX? I make this decision based on chat a bit and I get a sense for where your strengths and weaknesses are. Different people have different time requirements needed to prepare accordingly. I have... read more

As a student, the one learning resource that you can always keep with you 24 hours a day is your textbook. And that makes the book your best friend, because it is always there to help you learn more. But some friends are hard to understand. Some don't speak English well, some whisper, and some are moody. So you might need an interpreter sometimes.   That's where your tutor comes in. The tutor gives you one-on-one attention, taking you step-by-step through the book to help you understand what the book is trying to tell you and what the book is asking you to do. Tutors slowly and patiently take you through the examples, even when your teacher can't.   Use your tutors to explain your lessons in ways that simplify the concepts and clarify ideas. Tutors can help break down problem-solving procedures for you in small, digestible steps. You'd be surprised how much easier things can be when someone skilled and patient gives you individual attention and shares their... read more

Flashcards have been used for a long time by students that want to broaden their vocabulary, whether for learning a second language or increasing one's vocabulary of your primary language. Before computers, students often used index cards and wrote a word on one side, and the meaning of the word, or the equivalent word in another language on the other side. Now there are all sorts of flashcard websites and flashcard software programs available that basically do the same thing electronically. But regardless of the medium you use, there are some ways to use flashcards that are better than others. I'm going to recommend one way that I find very helpful. Instead of just randomly selecting 20 or 50 or 100 words, and trying to memorize them via flashcards, select vocabulary words that are in context. What this means is that it's better to create flashcards based on a reading passage or book or essay you've read, and then selecting words from what you've read and creating flashcards for... read more

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