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I haven't taken the MCAT, nor do I plan on taking it, but I have to wonder "could I tutor it?" Tutors are good at many things, maybe they can tutor subjects they don't know very well by studying it first. etc. etc.

Consider reducing a matrix to row-echelon form. Pretend we have a pivot (the entry we want to set to 1) equal to 3 and another entry in the same column with an entry equal to 5. We can make the pivot equal to 1 by multiplying every entry in its row by 1/3. But the result is that the problem with the other rows explode into a mess of fractions. Most people accept that and continue working with fractions throughout the entire process. A simple way to prevent the fraction problem is to replace the row containing the pivot with itself multiplied by 3 and subtract it from the row with a 5 in its column, multiplied by 2. This gives 10-9=1 for the pivot and it is a perfectly legal operation as long as we set the pivot row as a linear combination of itself and any other row.

Math Student's Civil Rights   I have the right to learn Math (Math is learnable like other subjects) I have a right to make mistakes, erase then, and try again (Failure points to what I have not learned yet) I have the right to ask for help (asking for help is a great decision) I have the right to ask questions when I don't understand (understanding is the primary goal) I have the right to ask questions until I understand (perseverance is priceless) I have the right to receive help and not feel stupid for receiving it (asking for help is natural) I have the right to not like some math concepts or disciplines (i.e. trigonometry, statistics, differential equations, etc.) I have the right to define success as learning no matter how I feel about Math or supporters I have the right to reduce negative self-talk & feelings I have the right to be treated as a person capable of learning I have the right to assess a helper's ability to... read more

This is the story of a certain student who faced a lot of difficulties understanding certain concepts in his class. He/She was at the point of giving up and failing that class when a deep beautiful voice called his/her name out loud, "Student!" He/She didn't understand what was going on. The voice called a second time, "Student, go to the tutoring center!" So the student walked his/her way to the student center and asked for a tutor to help.   The first tutor looked at him/her with an expression of disgust. "How can you not understand this?" the tutor asked. "It is very simple, just do this..." Confused, the student couldn't keep up with the tutor's technique. The tutor seemed to have had a bad beginning of the day and was very impatient. He also got on the top of his nerves, but always seemed to hold back. Scared, the student called onto a second tutor.   The second tutor came with an indifferent expression. He didn't... read more

Yes, the clock is ticking down toward summer break and while you're excited for the warm, lazy days of summer, you may also be pondering, "What am I going to do with these children for 12 weeks?" Yes, there are family vacations and camps to match every interest imaginable, and yes, you want wholesome, healthy activities that nurture the mind, body, and spirit. You also want to keep a balance so your children have enough activity to stave off boredom (and soon thereafter, contention in the ranks), but not so much activity that your children become stressed and exhausted. So, where, if anywhere, does summer tutoring fit in? Summer tutoring can be a great way to reinforce skills in reading, writing, and math. Some studies show that students lose as much as 2.6 months of academic progress during summer vacation (Shafer, 2016). So, academic reinforcement certainly sounds like a good idea...but it doesn't paint a picture of a fun-filled summer. Sure, you can sign your... read more

To my fellow educators and students,   I know that it is very tempting to give your students answers to their questions immediately, but sometimes it's best to let a student struggle a little. Asking students why they are doing what they are doing can help students to make lasting connections that go beyond that next test or ACT exam. This approach can be frustrating for both teachers and students at times, but it is quite rewarding.   I have a student who was completely scared about sharing their opinion on an answer they gave. Throughout most of the lesson i refused to give them a yea or nay answer. I asked them to talk it out and see if they could understand why they did what they did. The student was correct, but having students explain their answer and even get frustrated with me some helped this student achieve deeper understanding of the material. 

Project management combines people skills, general management skills, ethical standards, logical sequencing, and problem solving.  It is a dynamic profession.  It differs across industries.  The difficulty for both the learner and the instructor is that each brings their professional experiences into the learning environment.   The only way to mitigate this fact is to champion the fundamentals, to believe that the fundamentals, when properly executed, will work across industries. This requires the learner and the instructor to check their experiences at the door so that learning about the fundamentals can occur.  This approach levels the playing field by making the focus theoretical based.    This takes the focus away from defending or attacking theories and instead directs the learning towards how best to utilize these fundamental concepts in the daily application of project management.  I have taught many boot camps, collegiate... read more

  I used to teach engineers how to write. I loved it, but it was challenge; engineers are infamous for arguing a point into the ground. Whenever I taught them Plain Language and urged them to use it, the hair would bristle on the backs of their necks. Generally, the course of events to follow went something like this. They say: • Using Plain Language would be writing down to their readers • Making their writing understandable wasn’t necessary, because their audiences already understood the subject matter • Writing technical documents has always been done this way • This wasn’t the way they were taught to write After which, I stand in front of them. I look at them. I finally speak. I say, “Your teachers were wrong.” And, just short of rending of garments and gnashing of teeth, all hell breaks loose. (Did I mention that engineers love to argue?) Nevertheless, I continue. “It’s all because of a bunch of ancient Roman rhetoricians... read more

We all know we do better when we're well-rested than when we're not. Modern sleep research has started to uncover exactly why that's the case. In terms of memory, there are at least two important reasons to make sure you're getting enough sleep. First, we better remember what we learned the day before. This is because sleep plays an essential role in the conversion of short-term memory to long-term memory. Short-term memory relies heavily on a brain region known as the hippocampus (named after the Greek word for seahorse, given its shape), while long-term memory relies on a broad network of cortical association areas. When we learn new information, the hippocampus is very active, and when we sleep, it turns out that the activity of our hippocampus predicts how well we will remember what we learned when we wake up. Researchers have even found interesting ways to manipulate and improve this process. For example, in one study, experimenters paired the scent of a rose with a spatial... read more

I specialize in teaching essay structure and style. When I began tutoring, I had a vague idea that I'd work with college students like the friends for whom I'd proofread during university: young Americans who've grown up in a public school system which emphasized group work over individual learning, and who therefore never got a chance to develop their writing skills. I've certainly worked with students from a background very much like this. However, I've also had the pleasure of building a strong ESL clientele. At this point, I've spent enough time with ESL students to have made some observations about the nature of ESL learning and the way it is discussed. I'm certainly no expert, but by now I am a reliable dilettante. I speak with the authority of firsthand experience. From that vantage, I'd like to address one mistake which is frequently made in conversations about ESL learning. It is a very serious mistake and I have to believe that it muddles teachers' thinking considerably... read more

I combined eight subjects to complete a home-shopping website to post online. If you are a business, creative design, or writing student, you may wish to approach your professors to ask if they would give you credit for this website that you create by using the skills you learn from me and utilizing the subjects above. You will be provided with a template that may take you independently too long a time to get ready for your class. Your lessons with me will enable you to focus while co-piloting until you are ready to pilot the craft. I have already completed the entirety of steps (at least four lessons worth and maybe more) that it takes to get your novelties ideas open on the web. You can get ideas from your courses and incorporate them into the business at hand. Ask about it. The price for these lessons are higher than my normal rate and is $50.00 an hour.

From my experience, designing a lesson for one student could be challenging due to not being able to include group or pair-work, which is not only a great way for the students to apply what they have just learned with a fellow classmate allowing them to feel more comfortable to make mistakes but also gives the teacher the opportunity to walk around and listen in and find common errors that can be brought up to the class as a whole instead of singling out a single student's mistake possibly discouraging them, but also because after some time the student can easily get bored deterring them from fully learning the material the tutor is teaching. Here are five things I include in each lesson to ensure that the student is actively learning and having a fun time doing so as well.   1) Make your first lesson informal so they feel comfortable with you from the get-go. They will be hesitant until they feel it is okay to mistakes and the sooner you can get them to let their guard... read more

I started my Physics course this Summer telling my students they are not allowed to say "I don't know," unless they can't read, listen to a recording, watch a video, or ask a question of someone more knowledgeable. When I was in school we did not have access to information like students do today.  In my humble opinion, students need to bulk up on two things like body builders do using supplements. What are those two things students need to bulk up with? Asking quality questions and learning how they learn.  Take for example, Google is an awesome resource, but if you ask the wrong question or use terms inappropriately, you will not get the answer you seek. Ask a bad question one gets a bad answer. Ask a wrong question one gets a wrong answer. Ask an incomplete question one may very well get an incomplete answer. Its that simple. Quality of questions is paramount and good questions come from meticulous vocabulary management. Therefore, students must become... read more

i have just finished my Spacialist degree in education in Technology. I am also Microsoft certified teacher. I am convinced that education nowadays should be more practical than just memorizing. Technology has open doors to A new way of teaching. I am innovative. Creative. And that's the perfect balance to this job. I love to teach!  

1-4-2015 Happy New Year! As I begin this New Year, I am pondering what this year will bring. So I asked myself several questions: 1) How can I maximize my efficiency so my students get the maximum benefit? 2) How can I streamline the process of learning so the learning curve is greatly reduced? 3) How can I increase my communication efficiency so that my students not only grasp a concept, but retain the knowledge and put it into practice immediately. These are questions that demand answers. As anyone who examines my profile can attest, my main focus is on teaching the ASVAB test. A majority of my students have successfully passed my course and successfully passed the ASVAB test and are now in the military. Getting these students to pass the ASVAB is a daunting task. Why? well to begin with much of the prior learning that they (should) have attained has been forgotten by the time they come to the test. The most common... read more

          When planning to train for any kind of test preparation, most people assume that the best strategy is to gradually schedule more frequent tutoring as they get closer to the test date. This makes no sense. Think of the mind like a muscle. In this analogy, the first few weeks of training are slowly more strenuous, it's true. However, once you have built the foundation of skill, it's a matter of practice to increase ability in existing skill. Practice only makes perfect if you have that foundation. Otherwise, you are simply practicing your mistakes. As with any marathon, you want to perfect your skill, practice like crazy to build stamina, and then back off as you get closer to the event to ensure you are rested and ready.           Test prep works in exactly the same way. Instead of cramming before the test, leaving yourself wired and tired, distracted and unable to focus, the best... read more

It's not controversial to aver that procrastination is bad. Most would agree without giving it a second thought. But what about procrastination is so harmful, and why do we procrastinate when we readily agree we shouldn't? When I talk about procrastination, I'm talking about delaying an important task despite knowing we will suffer as a result. Why would we do this? The problem seems to have its roots in an inability to manage emotions, and from an overweighting of short-term benefits over long-term costs. In a landmark 1997 study, Dianne Tice and Roy Baumeister rated college students on an established scale of procrastination, then tracked their academic performance, stress, and general health throughout the semester. Initially the procrastinators reported lower levels of stress, presumably because they were enjoying more pleasurable activities in lieu of the work they should have been doing. By the end of the semester, however, the procrastinators earned lower... read more

My Big Secret A lot of people give me flattering feedback which I greatly appreciate, but it also humbles me to recognize that I am not special. I am certainly no genius! Let me share my secret. The reason I connect with students and get fast results is because I know exactly how they feel. I know their frustrations, and doubts, and weak points. I really do! How? Because I used to struggle too. It seems insane to say that I struggled in school, but it is true. Math (back in Scotland) was a nightmare - especially math. I was lousy at math all the way through! What? Yes. And now you want to tutor my child!?!? Yep! My secret is this ..... When I graduated from school my overall grades were good enough to get into university - all except math. I made the first (of many stupid decisions in my life). I signed up for Mechanical Engineering. Wasn't that crazy? That first year in college was horrible. I groaned and... read more

In my experience with elementary level students, I am constantly amazed by these kids imagination. However when it comes to math i find myself frustrated that their minds wander so much. Sometimes i want to just be like, "Super man and unicorns are not a part of math! pay attention!!!!" Reality is, that just doesn't help. I began trying to revamp my ways of teaching so that super man could join us in our lessons. I found that using examples that incorporate the child's imagination works wonders. They being to laugh and enjoy themselves when I am tutoring them and the best part is....THEY PAY ATTENTION! The fun examples also help them to remember math concepts when they go to take their tests. It is a win win for everyone. A basic example could be "superman already saved 4 people last week but this week he saved 5 more people from a burning building! So how many people has he saved?" We have taken a basic 4+5=9 math problem and made it fun for them. Sometimes... read more

You won't pass the exam because you are listening to people who took the exam 5,6 or even 20 years ago. The advice most of my students get is "just take a lot of questions,don't read the book" That is a sure way to fail,yes there are some people who can just take a lot of questions and "game" the exam but they are the ones you were always envious of in school, they looked like they weren't trying and still aced the exams. Almost every single student of mine says that is the advice they get from their supervisors. I have even heard of a few getting yelled at because they were reading the book. Some of those people took the exam in the 90s,when the exam questions were drastically different and the Vendors were actually helping write the questions on the exam. FINRA (formerly NASD) ended that practice a long time ago and there may have been some lingering questions from the "good ole days" they are pretty much gone now. This is not your father's... read more

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