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Listed Below are Cancellation policy and fees for Neha S.   1. If you are unable to attend a session (in person or online) that was scheduled, please give written notice through Wyzant 12 hours or more before start time of scheduled lesson. If done so, no charges will be applied to your account.   2. No Show: If you are more than 15 minutes late to a session (in person or online) and did not communicate to me why you are late before the session began or during that 15 minutes of tardiness, I will charge the full cost of the session and it is your responsibility to schedule another session and any other session will be charged as per my rate regardless of this missed session.   3. If you are late to any session but it is not considered a no show as per my policy, we can continue the session, you will be charged the full amount, but the time will be deducted from your session (Ie. if the session is for 5PM and you arrive at 5:10PM, the session will... read more

This is the story of a certain student who faced a lot of difficulties understanding certain concepts in his class. He/She was at the point of giving up and failing that class when a deep beautiful voice called his/her name out loud, "Student!" He/She didn't understand what was going on. The voice called a second time, "Student, go to the tutoring center!" So the student walked his/her way to the student center and asked for a tutor to help.   The first tutor looked at him/her with an expression of disgust. "How can you not understand this?" the tutor asked. "It is very simple, just do this..." Confused, the student couldn't keep up with the tutor's technique. The tutor seemed to have had a bad beginning of the day and was very impatient. He also got on the top of his nerves, but always seemed to hold back. Scared, the student called onto a second tutor.   The second tutor came with an indifferent expression. He didn't... read more

Nursing school is much tougher than you think when you first start in a program. Often it can be an overwhelming experience - the exams are very different than you've previously taken. These exam questions are at a higher level - application of knowledge. Very little of the exams are direct recall/knowledge type questions. My tutoring sessions are intended to help nursing students understand concepts and apply this knowledge to nursing based questions. Please contact me if you are struggling and need extra help with application or NCLEX style exam questions. I am excited to help students through their nursing school journey!

I am helping a ten-year-old special education child to read.  I will soon be tutoring him an hour every day of the week.  I am finding a lot of materials online; however, most if not all of them require that you pay to join a group to access them.  I do not want to do this.  Can anyone suggest any free resources?  I would like to print them off the computer and I would prefer not to use colored ink.

          When planning to train for any kind of test preparation, most people assume that the best strategy is to gradually schedule more frequent tutoring as they get closer to the test date. This makes no sense. Think of the mind like a muscle. In this analogy, the first few weeks of training are slowly more strenuous, it's true. However, once you have built the foundation of skill, it's a matter of practice to increase ability in existing skill. Practice only makes perfect if you have that foundation. Otherwise, you are simply practicing your mistakes. As with any marathon, you want to perfect your skill, practice like crazy to build stamina, and then back off as you get closer to the event to ensure you are rested and ready.           Test prep works in exactly the same way. Instead of cramming before the test, leaving yourself wired and tired, distracted and unable to focus, the best... read more

It's not controversial to aver that procrastination is bad. Most would agree without giving it a second thought. But what about procrastination is so harmful, and why do we procrastinate when we readily agree we shouldn't? When I talk about procrastination, I'm talking about delaying an important task despite knowing we will suffer as a result. Why would we do this? The problem seems to have its roots in an inability to manage emotions, and from an overweighting of short-term benefits over long-term costs. In a landmark 1997 study, Dianne Tice and Roy Baumeister rated college students on an established scale of procrastination, then tracked their academic performance, stress, and general health throughout the semester. Initially the procrastinators reported lower levels of stress, presumably because they were enjoying more pleasurable activities in lieu of the work they should have been doing. By the end of the semester, however, the procrastinators earned lower... read more

I haven't taken the MCAT, nor do I plan on taking it, but I have to wonder "could I tutor it?" Tutors are good at many things, maybe they can tutor subjects they don't know very well by studying it first. etc. etc.

In today's Writing Rundown, I want to leave the brainstorming process for a bit and discuss responding to a prompt. Take a look at the prompt I used for my last Literature Spotlight, “The Blanks Left Empty”: AP Literature Open-Ended Prompt, 1975, #2: Unlike the novelist, the writer of a play does not use his own voice and only rarely uses a narrator’s voice to guide the audience’s responses to character and action. Select a play you have read and write an essay in which you explain the techniques the playwright uses to guide his audience’s responses to the central characters and the action. You might consider the effect on the audience of things like setting, the use of comparable and contrasting characters, and the characters’ responses to each other. Support your argument with specific references to the play. Do not give a plot summary. Whew! That's a lot of information to sift through. Unfortunately, many high school and college-level writing prompts are as... read more

Marshaling the cognitive resources and committing the amount of time required to earn good grades and high test scores takes effort. The rewards from these achievements are often delayed, while the rewards from having fun with your friends, playing video games, interacting on social media, watching tv, etc. are more immediate. What strategies can you use to help overcome this mismatch? In the framework explored in this paper, the authors propose that the decision to delay gratification is mediated by two systems: a "cool" cognitive system, and a "hot" emotional system. The more the hot system dominates, the more likely you are to succumb to temptation. Thankfully, as we get older, the cool system matures and thus makes it easier for many of us to delay gratification. We are most vulnerable to the hot system when we are young. You’ve probably seen the marshmallow experiment in which young children are placed in front of a table with a marshmallow... read more

  I used to teach engineers how to write. I loved it, but it was challenge; engineers are infamous for arguing a point into the ground. Whenever I taught them Plain Language and urged them to use it, the hair would bristle on the backs of their necks. Generally, the course of events to follow went something like this. They say: • Using Plain Language would be writing down to their readers • Making their writing understandable wasn’t necessary, because their audiences already understood the subject matter • Writing technical documents has always been done this way • This wasn’t the way they were taught to write After which, I stand in front of them. I look at them. I finally speak. I say, “Your teachers were wrong.” And, just short of rending of garments and gnashing of teeth, all hell breaks loose. (Did I mention that engineers love to argue?) Nevertheless, I continue. “It’s all because of a bunch of ancient Roman rhetoricians... read more

This is my first official post as a Wyant tutor. I am not new to tutoring, but I am new to Wyzant. Today at a public library's study room, I will meet my first Wyzant student. I have tutored at the college level for the past few years, but I am a veteran homeschool mom, so I also have experience with children as young as 3 and as old as 16.   My plan is to use both oral questionnaires and written and computer learning assessments.  I am assessing my student for  4th-grade math using an Illinois Common Core standards baseline assessment available at the state website. reading issues by having him read some short passages and asking questions learning style at Accelerated Learning study habits- using 2 online questionnaires atWhat kind of Student Are You and Study Habits I also will be asking questions to get to know the child and his likes, family members, pets, etc. I am both excited and a little bit nervous... read more

I recently had the experience of arranging to meet a new client's high-school student for their first time using online tutoring with me. We had already exchanged messages on the platform we intended to use in an attempt to ensure everything was ready for that night's session when the student would be ready.   However, we encountered some problems!  Although we were both logged into the video-conferencing application, and had earlier exchanged IMs through the application, neither of us appeared to be online to the other! After trying the usual restart-the application, restart-the-machine first trouble-shooting steps, to no avail I asked the client to try checking their application for any available updates.  Well, evidently there must have been some updates that hadn't run for quite some time (or perhaps an antivirus program or firewall interfered with the update process, or perhaps the operating system was out-of-date too, or ... could have been any number of... read more

If English is your second language and you would like another pair of eyes to review your final research paper prior to submission, please contact me. I'm available online, via email, and for those graduate students located in Central Florida, in person. I've assisted many nursing professionals, whose second language is English, to achieve an A on a final research project. My experience includes reviewing papers written for online graduate courses, papers written in group collaboration, rough drafts (minimum 5 pages with draft in-text citations and draft bibliography, plus copies of supporting research articles), and final research papers. I can consult with you at any stage during your research and writing process. I've even helped students breakthrough challenges such as writer's block and brainstormed ideas for research projects!   Sometimes writers feel overwhelmed and I can help by reviewing the professor's rubric, writing assignment criteria, and any email... read more

Yes, the clock is ticking down toward summer break and while you're excited for the warm, lazy days of summer, you may also be pondering, "What am I going to do with these children for 12 weeks?" Yes, there are family vacations and camps to match every interest imaginable, and yes, you want wholesome, healthy activities that nurture the mind, body, and spirit. You also want to keep a balance so your children have enough activity to stave off boredom (and soon thereafter, contention in the ranks), but not so much activity that your children become stressed and exhausted. So, where, if anywhere, does summer tutoring fit in? Summer tutoring can be a great way to reinforce skills in reading, writing, and math. Some studies show that students lose as much as 2.6 months of academic progress during summer vacation (Shafer, 2016). So, academic reinforcement certainly sounds like a good idea...but it doesn't paint a picture of a fun-filled summer. Sure, you can sign your... read more

When I worked for Kaplan, they required all private tutoring lessons to be two hours. That surprised me because I thought of lessons as one-hour affairs. However, I soon discovered that we could get through a lot more in one two-hour lesson than we could in two one-hour lessons.  Why? For starters, each lesson always starts with a few pleasantries and takes a couple of minutes to get going. Furthermore, it usually takes 15 minutes or so for students' minds to warm up and perform at their best. So by the time we are at our best flow, if the lesson is only one hour, we have often used a quarter to a third of our lesson time.  In my experience, I've found that 90 minutes works well for many students. With 90 minute lessons, we can go through the warm up period and spend more than an hour at our most productive level. An hour is generally too short and delivers less value per dollar than a longer lesson.  Exceptionally motivated students can often... read more

It is very good that you are thinking about teaching your child about essays, as they are going to have to do a lot of them when they get to college and university. And, even though the education system puts emphasis on knowledge, the fact is that they are judged on how well they display and express that knowledge, and that is often done via the essay. So, starting them fairly young is important, but you must also remember that they are not yet to the standards of Niccollo Machiavelli or Jane Austen. So, be gentle with your essay lessons. Do not be too harsh with your child The last thing you want to do is make writing a nasty or negative experience for your child. If they experience anything negative then it will impact your child for the rest of his or her life, and you will probably end up visiting him or her in prison when he/she reaches thirty, so that you can look at his/her newest prison tattoo. Start by giving them enjoyable writing experiences This... read more

Hello students! Like everyone, I myself have struggled to learn Japanese Kanji. It's really difficult. There's so many parts, readings, and often meanings differ depending on how the character is used. Here are some tips for learning Kanji.   Learn Kanji through RADICAL           Radicals are the different parts of a kanji character. Instead of memorizing each character one by one, memorize them radical groups. For example, learn all of the kanji with the radical 日 (nichi/hi). The group would include characters such as 明(あさ)、曜(よう)、and 書(か). This trick will also help you in reading kanji you haven't seen before.        2. Use flashcards to label things around your house          You can do the same thing with vocabulary. This time label flashcards with the kanji on the front and the reading and meaning on the back. Then tap them to the... read more

Project management combines people skills, general management skills, ethical standards, logical sequencing, and problem solving.  It is a dynamic profession.  It differs across industries.  The difficulty for both the learner and the instructor is that each brings their professional experiences into the learning environment.   The only way to mitigate this fact is to champion the fundamentals, to believe that the fundamentals, when properly executed, will work across industries. This requires the learner and the instructor to check their experiences at the door so that learning about the fundamentals can occur.  This approach levels the playing field by making the focus theoretical based.    This takes the focus away from defending or attacking theories and instead directs the learning towards how best to utilize these fundamental concepts in the daily application of project management.  I have taught many boot camps, collegiate... read more

i have just finished my Spacialist degree in education in Technology. I am also Microsoft certified teacher. I am convinced that education nowadays should be more practical than just memorizing. Technology has open doors to A new way of teaching. I am innovative. Creative. And that's the perfect balance to this job. I love to teach!  

We all know we do better when we're well-rested than when we're not. Modern sleep research has started to uncover exactly why that's the case. In terms of memory, there are at least two important reasons to make sure you're getting enough sleep. First, we better remember what we learned the day before. This is because sleep plays an essential role in the conversion of short-term memory to long-term memory. Short-term memory relies heavily on a brain region known as the hippocampus (named after the Greek word for seahorse, given its shape), while long-term memory relies on a broad network of cortical association areas. When we learn new information, the hippocampus is very active, and when we sleep, it turns out that the activity of our hippocampus predicts how well we will remember what we learned when we wake up. Researchers have even found interesting ways to manipulate and improve this process. For example, in one study, experimenters paired the scent of a rose with a spatial... read more

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