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Hi this is carolyn. i love to help students with their drawing to be come a better drawer and help them with there spelling and over come there fear of spelling and drawing i am willing to help.

Everyone has their own approach to writing. Some writers are very methodical throughout the entire writing process while others write freely and revise their way to the final draft. For proposals and admissions essays, a structured writing process draws from the strengths of both approaches. It starts with a creative focus and concludes with deliberate writing and revision. First, with the requirements and prompt in mind, the writer lets him or herself write and think freely. Second, the writer reviews his or her own notes and ideas to identify a cohesive focal point. Next, the writer distills the ideas into a concrete thesis and engages peers, friends, family, and instructors to develop and strengthen the arguments. Finally, the writer lays out the elements that support the thesis and backs it with specific examples or anecdotes. Creative Stage. In this stage, the writer thinks and writes freely but not chaotically. It starts with a careful review of the requirements laid... read more

One question I just received on a different blog was how to handle the 4-star ratings that come up. No matter how good you are, someone will not be satisfied. I personally have received two 4-stars here on WyzAnt, one when I was just starting out, and one just today. For the 4-star early on, it was from a weekly student who only rated the very first meeting as a 4-star. When I learned it was him (either WyzAnt didn't let us see ratings back when I began or I just hadn't figured out how), I approached him about it at the end of our next meeting. One thing I've learned in life is to ask questions instead, so I simply inquired as to why the first lesson was a 4-star to him. He thought back and couldn't really remember why; the session had gone well to him, and he couldn't remember anything in particular that went wrong; he simply thought that 4-stars was still "good". When I explained to him that it wasn't really how things worked on WyzAnt, how only 5-stars is "good"... read more

A student needed to draw a circle with a 2" diameter, then draw the following angles: 100°, 120º, and 140º. She had her compass but didn't have her protractor.   First she drew the circle, then she drew 2 perpendicular diameters. Since a circle encompasses 360º, each quadrant comprising 90º. We drew the 120º angle first using an entire 90º quadrant plus 1/3 of the adjacent quadrant, erasing the unneeded line, which leaves 60º in that second quadrant.   Then we found the circumference of the circle (C=πD, or 3.14x2"=6.28"). Next we found 1/4 of the circumference (6.28"/4=1.57"). We wanted to be able find the arc length in 10º increments, so we divided the arc of one quadrant by 9 (1.57"/9=0.174"). We converted this into 1/16ths of an inch by multiplying by 16 (0.174"x16=2.79 sixteenths of an inch).   Getting back to our angles, we measured the 100º angle next by taking our remaining 60º and adding 40º of... read more

Through our tendencies of human nature, we don't like to ask for help. We want the recognition, the glory and the credit to be given to only ourselves. Unfortunately, the thought that we can single-handedly do everything on our own is a huge misconception. The world has been built on a foundation of people working together to towards a common goal. The world needs individuals to work together to brainstorm and execute plans for the future.   School and college provide opportunities to work together. Through group projects, presentations, senior design projects, etc. students are asked to work with one another. It is, rather unfortunate, that sometimes we are paired with people who we do not work well with, but that is life. School and college provide students with opportunities to work with people and adapt to others ways--whether we like them or not.   Now, when one must adapt to another's ways (for example a teacher's or professor's) it can sometimes be... read more

I have been on WA now for several months (granted, through the summer months to start with), and although there were plenty of jobs that I would have accepted, I applied to several, and no one takes me up.  It is for any age Science, math, chemistry, physics, and I will also help with composition, English, etc  I get no one.  I double checked what makes a good job application, etc.  I double checked my profile. So is my price too high?  WA has not suggested nor given any guidance on any of these things, so I am asking you all. Thank you.

There are a lot of different opinions about how to set up a Lightroom catalog. Some teachers suggest creating a new catalog for each shoot, some say one new catalog for each year. After 7 years of working with students privately, I have to say - one catalog - is all you need, especially if you keep your Library photos and folders in order. And your Library should be on a dedicated external hard drive. And, if you're using a laptop, then Smart Previews are the way to go, as they allow you to edit and develop your photos without actually having the hard drive with you.    What's a Catalog and what's a Library?    The Lightroom catalog is how Lightroom knows where your photos are on your hard drive. It is also where it keeps all the information on what you've done - flags, rejects, developing, books, etc. Consider the Catalog a big filing system, but it's not a file cabinet. This is a unique aspect of how Lightroom works and can trip up many beginning... read more

Hello.  I am a private tutor in Westchester county.  This is about 40 minutes from NYC.  Many affluent people live here.  However, there are also many middle class and lower middle thar struggle to pay bills?  Does anyone offer rates based on grade?  For example 40.00 per hour for elementary, 50-60 per hour for middle school and 60-70 per hour for high school.  I have been posting on social media, however I am finding that many people, particularly the younger grades are finding my rate of 60.00 per hour too high.  Should I lower my rate, until I get fully booked and then move up the rate as I get more in demand?

Steps to Developing Effective Study Skills Step 1: Assessing Your Learning Style Step 2: Knowing Your Interests Step 3: Developing Appropriate Tools to Enhance Studying Step 4: Making the Subject Work for You (even if you hate it or don’t get it) Step 5: Constructing a Learning-Style-Friendly Environment Step 6: Other Considerations in Developing Effective Study Skills When we sit down to study, most of us follow a routine. We get our books together, get comfy (at a desk, on the bed, sitting on the floor, etc.), and set to work. Some of us turn on the TV or some music; others of us make our environment as quiet as it can be. What we do to study varies, but generally we reread our notes, textbooks, or study guides, and call it a day. The day of the test, we struggle to recall what we studied. Afterwards, we admonish ourselves for not studying hard enough or long enough, and doubt our performance. Does this sound familiar? It doesn’t need to be this way. Effective... read more

Tonight I met with one of my students, who is in 6th grade, and we are working together to tackle proper essay structure.    This can be a tough issue for students, especially the really creative ones. These are the students that are FULL of ideas, and all of them are equally good, so why can't they just put them all into one essay or story? Trust me, it's not easy to kill your darlings, but it must be done (until you get a blog, of course).    In general, all essays, or even stories should be structured in a similar fashion: an introduction, a body, and a conclusion. Or, a beginning, a middle, and an end.    The introduction will include the visuals, the details to get the reader completely hooked into the story. If this is an analytical essay, the introduction will include the argument, or the point you're trying to prove.    Next comes the body, or the middle of the essay/story. This will typically be the longest... read more

I couldn't find any references to this tool in the blogs or forums, so I wanted to put this out there.   I use A Web Whiteboard (AWW) found at https://awwapp.com for all my online tutoring needs. No download, registration, or install necessary... and it's completely free! It also has zero ads or any other clutter you might associate with any free tool. It appears the developers behind AWW make their money by selling a premium product to those interested in that sort of thing, but I've found the free tool more than enough for my needs.   It has pretty much everything I'm looking for in a whiteboard tool: multiple colors, incredibly simple to invite students to join the board, cross-platform (any student with an internet connection can use it, and it works in every browser, as far as I can tell), and there is an option to save the images you create so you and your students can have material for reference later.   The only conceivable drawback... read more

If English is your second language and you would like another pair of eyes to review your final research paper prior to submission, please contact me. I'm available online, via email, and for those graduate students located in Central Florida, in person. I've assisted many nursing professionals, whose second language is English, to achieve an A on a final research project. My experience includes reviewing papers written for online graduate courses, papers written in group collaboration, rough drafts (minimum 5 pages with draft in-text citations and draft bibliography, plus copies of supporting research articles), and final research papers. I can consult with you at any stage during your research and writing process. I've even helped students breakthrough challenges such as writer's block and brainstormed ideas for research projects!   Sometimes writers feel overwhelmed and I can help by reviewing the professor's rubric, writing assignment criteria, and any email... read more

Online tutoring is definitely a great thing not only to take, but to teach. It allows you to be flexible with your schedule, you don't have to leave your home, and you save money on gas! However, there can be some downsides to online tutoring.  If you live with family, there can be distractions and background noise You may not be technologically savvy You may find some students would prefer tutoring in a face-to-face setting Even despite these setbacks, WyzAnt's online tutoring platform is an amazing way to interact with students. Here are some solutions to these issues: Make sure you have a designated "tutoring room" or quiet time during tutoring hours. Living with family, especially children, can be difficult. However, letting others know that you need silence, or having a designated room where there is little to no family traffic can help improve the quality of the session. Even if you are not technologically savvy, WyzAnt offers a... read more

No one likes to mess up, but going to great lengths to avoid errors - even when the consequences of making an error are benign - is unlikely to help you learn. In fact, in her review of the literature, Janet Metcalfe makes a compelling argument that making errors while learning - so long as you receive corrective feedback - results in better outcomes than making no errors at all. Her findings are somewhat counterintuitive. If the goal is to perform flawlessly in high-stakes situations, shouldn't we pursue perfection in order to prepare for them? Early theorists feared that the commission of errors would make it harder to learn the correct response later on. One of the most famous psychologists of the 20th century, Albert Bandura, believed that only correct responses should be rewarded; errors, if they occurred, should be ignored. However, what Metcalfe's review of the literature suggests is that errors should be encouraged as part of an active exploratory learning process,... read more

I reserve the right to charge up to the full amount of a lesson or the amount of an hour-long session, whichever is the lesser, in the event of cancelled lessons less than 4 hours before the scheduled start time of the lesson.   Additionally, I reserve the right to charge this same cancellation fee for no shows. I consider no shows to be sessions where the student does not arrive within 15 minutes of the scheduled start time without notice given 4 hours in advance.

Has anyone noticed the profusion (glut) of a questions coming in that are written exclusively in (what I think is) Chinese? (Resources/Answers)   This looks to me like an attack intended to disturb the normal function and use of the WyzAnt site. 

Know the strengths and weakness of the student in the particular subject area. Highlight their strength and help them overcome weaknesses Show interest in what students are doing academically outside of tutoring Re-affirm them and let them know that you are proud of them when they get a concept that was once confusing to them. Give students breaks as needed, recognize when they are tired. Listen to students and provide the best service you can

1) PAY ATTENTION IN CLASS: Do not sleep or be otherwise engaged in inattentive behavior, otherwise you will miss out on the lesson, and the teacher will likely dismiss you as lazy and indifferent, and be less likely to offer you help or extra-credit when you need it. 2) TAKE NOTES: I prefer "Composition Books" for notes. They are inexpensive, can be purchased at drugstores, supermarkets, etc., and are sturdy and well-made (they have hard covers, and are nicely-bound, so they are less likely to lose your papers, like spiral pads do.) Consider everything that is written on the board important enough to write down, and practice discerning what is important and unimportant when the teacher talks. A good teacher usually stresses or repeats things that are important, and of course, if a review is given, things mentioned in a review should be written in your notes. 3) MAKE FLASH-CARDS: Flash-cards can be an important study-tool. They are especially helpful for memorizing... read more

I mentioned this problem from one of my earliest blog posts with one of my students last week, so I thought I'd bring it back as this week's Math Journey.  Enjoy!   ~   The SAT messes with your head. Don't feel embarrassed, it messes with everyone's head. It's designed to. The SAT is a test of your critical reasoning skills, meaning it's actually far more about logic and figuring out the correct course of action than it is about actually knowing the material. This is nowhere more evident than on the Math section. The SAT Math trips up so many students because they expect it to behave like a math test. The truth is, the SAT Math is about figuring out how to answer each problem using as little actual math as possible. It's all about working quickly, and the questions are structured such that they conceal the quick logic and context-based route behind the facade of a more complicated math question. They're trying to psych you out; to make you... read more

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