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I should have done this in March. This year it took me 1 week (after work hours) to complete all the puzzles.  The last puzzle is NOT friendly to full time  shift employees (hint). There are only 2 right answers; one answer must be done during scheduled work hours and the other answer must be done after any normal person goes to bed at night (or early morning).   It's still not too late to get onto http://www.pidaychallenge.com and work through 24 puzzles to get onto the Genius board. You may work at the puzzles at your own pace.  Stats stayed consistent to previous years; the total set of puzzles are still hard enough that only approximately 10% successfully work all problems.  Maybe, there is an endurance factor :-)  There were logic, probability, algebra, geometry, and physics problems/puzzles/questions. Enjoy the challenge!

When I worked for Kaplan, they required all private tutoring lessons to be two hours. That surprised me because I thought of lessons as one-hour affairs. However, I soon discovered that we could get through a lot more in one two-hour lesson than we could in two one-hour lessons. Why? For starters, each lesson always starts with a few pleasantries and takes a couple of minutes to get going. Furthermore, it usually takes 15 minutes or so for students' minds to warm up and perform at their best. So by the time we are at our best flow, if the lesson is only one hour together, we have often used a quarter to a third of our lesson time. In my experience, I've found that 90 minutes works well for most students (exceptions: young students, and students who begin tutoring very close to their test date). With 90 minutes, we can go through the warm up period and spend more than an hour at our most productive level. And 90 minutes isn't so long that it strains students' attention... read more

As tutors, we want our students to grasp the material, but having the student say "I get it" is not enough of an indicator. Some students are too reserved to say that they don't get it, some are too proud, and some just want to get the session over with as quickly as possible. We, as tutors, have the responsibility to test their supposed understanding by giving them practice problems to see if they're capable of solving them on their own. 

I am helping a ten-year-old special education child to read.  I will soon be tutoring him an hour every day of the week.  I am finding a lot of materials online; however, most if not all of them require that you pay to join a group to access them.  I do not want to do this.  Can anyone suggest any free resources?  I would like to print them off the computer and I would prefer not to use colored ink.

This is my first official post as a Wyant tutor. I am not new to tutoring, but I am new to Wyzant. Today at a public library's study room, I will meet my first Wyzant student. I have tutored at the college level for the past few years, but I am a veteran homeschool mom, so I also have experience with children as young as 3 and as old as 16.   My plan is to use both oral questionnaires and written and computer learning assessments.  I am assessing my student for  4th-grade math using an Illinois Common Core standards baseline assessment available at the state website. reading issues by having him read some short passages and asking questions learning style at Accelerated Learning study habits- using 2 online questionnaires atWhat kind of Student Are You and Study Habits I also will be asking questions to get to know the child and his likes, family members, pets, etc. I am both excited and a little bit nervous... read more

All cancellations and rescheduling must be made in writing (through WyzAnt messaging) at least 36 hours prior to the lesson start time.   If the lesson is rescheduled with notice more than 36 hours in advance of the lesson start time, no fee is assessed. If the lesson is rescheduled with notice less than 36 hours, a $10 fee may be assessed.   Note: While I can usually find a time to reschedule, it is not always possible. In those cases, it will be considered a cancellation. If the lesson is cancelled with no plan to reschedule, a $15 fee is assessed. For no-shows, a cancellation fee equal to the full amount of the lesson is assessed. A student will be considered a no-show if they are more than 15 minutes late. In the case of documented emergencies or extreme illness, exceptions can be made at my discretion.   Lessons will be charged according to their scheduled beginning and end times, regardless of whether a... read more

The complaints against WyzAnt’s 40% commission demands a response. Suppose a tutor with 15 hours of work time through WyzAnt charges $40 an hour. Of that amount, WyzAnt will automatically deduct $16. This deduction is based on WyzAnt’s commission rate, which is 40% for the first 20 hours of work time. So the tutor is not earning $40 an hour; rather, the tutor is earning $24 an hour. According to a number of individuals, WyzAnt’s 40% commission rate is too high, way above average. Some folks, oddly enough, have even posted complaints on other websites. Why? Here's some food for thought. 1. Twenty-four dollars an hour is higher than any state’s hourly minimum wage. 2. You can create your website for tutors and charge a lower commission. 3. If you tutor for an hour you will be paid $24. 4. If you don’t tutor for an hour you will not be paid $24. 5. Twenty-four dollars is more than zero dollars. 6. You don’t have to stay with WyzAnt, but before you leave... read more

I have been on WA now for several months (granted, through the summer months to start with), and although there were plenty of jobs that I would have accepted, I applied to several, and no one takes me up.  It is for any age Science, math, chemistry, physics, and I will also help with composition, English, etc  I get no one.  I double checked what makes a good job application, etc.  I double checked my profile. So is my price too high?  WA has not suggested nor given any guidance on any of these things, so I am asking you all. Thank you.

We all know we do better when we're well-rested than when we're not. Modern sleep research has started to uncover exactly why that's the case. In terms of memory, there are at least two important reasons to make sure you're getting enough sleep. First, we better remember what we learned the day before. This is because sleep plays an essential role in the conversion of short-term memory to long-term memory. Short-term memory relies heavily on a brain region known as the hippocampus (named after the Greek word for seahorse, given its shape), while long-term memory relies on a broad network of cortical association areas. When we learn new information, the hippocampus is very active, and when we sleep, it turns out that the activity of our hippocampus predicts how well we will remember what we learned when we wake up. Researchers have even found interesting ways to manipulate and improve this process. For example, in one study, experimenters paired the scent of a rose with a spatial... read more

You might wonder what emotion has to do with learning, and why I am writing a blog about sleep and emotion. If you think about it, though, how you to react challenging situations - the emotions you feel, and the cognitions, physiology, and behaviors that accompany them - can have a profound impact on how you learn. Indeed, emotional reactivity can have a profound impact in multiple domains, but in this blog we will focus on its impact on learning. Modern neuroscience is not necessary to understand that sleep is fundamentally important. However, it increasingly allows us to understand why that is the case. Andrea Goldstein and Matt Walker reviewed the literature on sleep and emotion and make a compelling case for the causal role of sleep in optimal affective brain function. For our purposes, I want to focus on the overarching theme of how sleep deprivation diminishes effective emotional reactivity. When people are sleep deprived for even one night, functional... read more

As a special educator who has worked in the public schools and tutored privately, I've observed that all students learn best in an emotionally supportive environment. Most students with special needs have accumulated a long history of negative learning interactions over the years. They feel inferior to "better" students, they sense that teachers expect less of them, and above all, they are painfully aware of their parents' disappointment and anxiety. I have tutored students at very different grade levels and found many of them full of anxiety, to the extent that in some cases absolutely no work was accomplished due to emotional roadblocks. Why? The problem may be an emotional one to start with, or it may arise because by the time parents decide to pay for help from a professional, they have exhausted themselves trying to understand and explain why their child is blocked. An emotionally supportive environment, paradoxically, may not be the one in which they are most loved:... read more

Project management combines people skills, general management skills, ethical standards, logical sequencing, and problem solving.  It is a dynamic profession.  It differs across industries.  The difficulty for both the learner and the instructor is that each brings their professional experiences into the learning environment.   The only way to mitigate this fact is to champion the fundamentals, to believe that the fundamentals, when properly executed, will work across industries. This requires the learner and the instructor to check their experiences at the door so that learning about the fundamentals can occur.  This approach levels the playing field by making the focus theoretical based.    This takes the focus away from defending or attacking theories and instead directs the learning towards how best to utilize these fundamental concepts in the daily application of project management.  I have taught many boot camps, collegiate... read more

You won't pass the exam because you are listening to people who took the exam 5,6 or even 20 years ago. The advice most of my students get is "just take a lot of questions,don't read the book" That is a sure way to fail,yes there are some people who can just take a lot of questions and "game" the exam but they are the ones you were always envious of in school, they looked like they weren't trying and still aced the exams. Almost every single student of mine says that is the advice they get from their supervisors. I have even heard of a few getting yelled at because they were reading the book. Some of those people took the exam in the 90s,when the exam questions were drastically different and the Vendors were actually helping write the questions on the exam. FINRA (formerly NASD) ended that practice a long time ago and there may have been some lingering questions from the "good ole days" they are pretty much gone now. This is not your father's... read more

Late University of Chicago Professor Emeritus Joseph Williams was arguably one of the best writing instructors of our time.  I met him years ago when he was teaching a judicial writing course at the National Judicial College. The genius of his approach was to improve clarity in legal and business writing, by asking writiers to first sketch a "story" of their work, including the list of "characters" (nouns) and actions (verbs).  By focusing on storytelling, you as a writer are forced to be more concise in explaining information to your reader--in a more active context.  Using the "character-action" approach to writing simplifies your lanaguge, places responsbility cleary for following regulatoins, and reduces your use of the passive voice. Consider these two examples: (Statutory Instrument 1991 No 2680, The Public Works Contracts Regulations 1991, Part 1, 2.4, page 4)   'General saving for old... read more

I specialize in teaching essay structure and style. When I began tutoring, I had a vague idea that I'd work with college students like the friends for whom I'd proofread during university: young Americans who've grown up in a public school system which emphasized group work over individual learning, and who therefore never got a chance to develop their writing skills. I've certainly worked with students from a background very much like this. However, I've also had the pleasure of building a strong ESL clientele. At this point, I've spent enough time with ESL students to have made some observations about the nature of ESL learning and the way it is discussed. I'm certainly no expert, but by now I am a reliable dilettante. I speak with the authority of firsthand experience. From that vantage, I'd like to address one mistake which is frequently made in conversations about ESL learning. It is a very serious mistake and I have to believe that it muddles teachers' thinking considerably... read more

I'm always a fan of more information rather than less. I do well tutoring both cost and financial accounting. Some tutors don't and they know it. If we qualify for these topics separately, we don't have to answer inquiries with, "Yes, I know one but not the other." That kind of clarity in place of wasted communications always benefits tutors. It also very much benefits students. When you increase clarity for both tutors and students, you save selection time and provide the best fit, which is the overriding goal. The best fit is always the better outcome because it makes for happier students and better ratings for the tutor.

Many people think of tutoring as a remedial endeavor, but that really isn't the right way to think about it. The fact of the matter is that classroom instruction can never be tailored to individual students, which means that learning is rarely optimal. By necessity, teachers must teach to the middle of the class. The teacher's pace, style, and goals are geared to the class as a whole, not specific students. With private tutoring, on the other hand, lessons can be specifically tailored to the individual student. For students who plan to take the ISEE or SSAT - tests that inevitably include material students have never encountered before - starting early is important. The goal of enrichment tutoring is to ensure students have a strong foundation in the core knowledge areas that will determine how they do on these tests.  When a student is not excelling in a core subject, it is often because the class is moving too quickly, the teacher's style is out of sync with the... read more

  For those of you who may have purchased Apple's spiffy $79 external CD/DVD burner (or Superdrive as they call it), it may not have worked when you plugged it into your older Mac. A lot of times a person's built-in optical drive fails, and they see the new external at the Apple Store. They naturally grab one assuming it'll work because they'll be using it with a Mac. Hopefully there's a "Genius" selling it to them who's going to ask which Mac they plan on using it with. I'd think probably not. It turns out it's only the fairly newer Macs that support it. When you plug it in, your older Mac might very well inform you that "This Apple External CD/DVD drive is not compatible with this Mac. Please go to Apple Support to read more." What they show you is a compatibility matrix that seems to makes no sense. I haven't compared every spec of every Mac they list, but 2009 seems to be the general cutoff.   Perhaps Apple requires USB 3, and... read more

The reconciliation feature in QuickBooks is a very powerful tool, but my experience has been that the majority of users aren't utilizing its features effectively. In addition, the most common usage of this feature is to reconcile bank statements, but it can also be used to reconcile other accounts as well. Starting a reconciliation is relatively easy, but the reconciliation window that appears after you click on Continue has some features that may not be all that obvious. The first feature is the fact that every column in the reconciliation window can be sorted simply by clicking once on the column heading. If you want the sort in reverse order, click on the column heading a second time. This is especially useful if the bank statement lists cleared checks separately from all other transactions. Click on the Ref# column so the transactions are listed by number and reconcile those. Then click on the Date column so that the entries match the rest of the transactions listed... read more

It is very good that you are thinking about teaching your child about essays, as they are going to have to do a lot of them when they get to college and university. And, even though the education system puts emphasis on knowledge, the fact is that they are judged on how well they display and express that knowledge, and that is often done via the essay. So, starting them fairly young is important, but you must also remember that they are not yet to the standards of Niccollo Machiavelli or Jane Austen. So, be gentle with your essay lessons. Do not be too harsh with your child The last thing you want to do is make writing a nasty or negative experience for your child. If they experience anything negative then it will impact your child for the rest of his or her life, and you will probably end up visiting him or her in prison when he/she reaches thirty, so that you can look at his/her newest prison tattoo. Start by giving them enjoyable writing experiences This... read more

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