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It's that day and time. It's time to get up in front a group and deliver your scheduled speech. (Hopefully you've organized your main points and documentation - worked on the presentation and practiced your delivery - before now.) Who are the people listening – or not listening – to you? Why are they there? Audience analysis involves identifying the audience and adapting your presentation to them. This doesn’t mean “saying what they want to hear.” Audience adaptation should guide your content development and approaches to delivery. Audiences can include reluctant attendees, indifferent visitors, agreeable supporters, and angry or fearful dissidents. The “we have to be there” mindset. For instance, I would contend that students in a public speaking class – and their motivation to listen to you – is somewhat mixed. (Hey, they’ve “got” to be there regularly, right? We refer to this as a “captive” audience.) In my experience, here are some of the... read more

The entrance exams for colleges are the toughest exams that students need to face. It is important to be with your child and help him or her prepare for it from an early stage. Read on to find out some ways in which you can make college admission easier for your child: Gathering information The deadline for college applications, process of applying, type of admission test and the minimum cutoff score should be found out. You can gather this vital information for your child and make it available to your child when required. It is important to ensure that your ward does not forget the scheduled test date and other requirements. Encouraging the child to take the test a year early It is a good idea to go for a trial run before the actual exam. You should persuade your child to take entrance exams in the junior year itself to get an idea about the question pattern and requirement of time management. This can ensure that when the actual time for admission comes,... read more

I have studied Electrical and Computer Engineering and received Master degree in 2008. While I was studying at university, I worked as a teacher assistant. I have taught many courses to undergraduate and graduate students. In addition, I taught a lot of elementary and high school students as tutor. Both of these experiences convinced me to pursue tutoring as a career. Therefore, I have tried hard to become a good teacher. I realized that teacher preparation is the major determinant of a great teacher. I have taught large variety of courses; however, my best experience is computer programming. Right now, I have some college and high school students whom I am teaching Java, C/C++, Matlab, and object oriented programming. I love teaching the computer programming to any student and can transmit information in the best way at minimum time. If you have any problems in programming and want to become ready for your class or doing your homework, I could help you. You are going to... read more

I am promoting the idea of students working daily to increase vocabulary skills! I primarily tutor students who are writing essays, applying to universities, and/or preparing for the GRE, NCLEX, or MCAT. A rich vocabulary is a necessary foundation for life. In test situations, students cannot count on "looking it up on Google". I have my students use a 3x5 index card as they are reading any book, write down any unfamiliar words that they come across during the reading session, and then look them up in a dictionary at the end of the reading session. They then write the definitions on the index card. At the end of the book, they have a list of new vocabulary words. if students grew up using a lot of technology and not reading, it is vital to start now with books that have a rich treasure of great vocabulary words. Enjoy! Rachel High-stakes testing, Essay writing, many other subjects

In addition to the usual suggestions of getting a good night's sleep, and eating a good breakfast the day of the test, I suggest the following: 1. I have my students go to the test site prior to the test, especially in high-stakes situations such as the GRE. I recommend they do this from one to four weeks ahead of time. They check out the route and the parking situation, and mentally picture themselves going in and coming out of the test site door with a happy and confident disposition. If the student has not yet done this, that is still a good idea to do about 48 hours prior to the test. 2. Throughout the tutoring, I have my students review challenging vocabulary words, along with the mnemonic devices I provide. We use colored index cards. In the 48 hour period before the exam, the student would review any words and mnemonic devices that still remain challenging. 3. My students have large posters for their walls that have visual aids for key concepts. These would also... read more

I see increasing numbers of students returning to college and vocational schools, to obtain more education and be competitive in this economy. There is a great need for tutors to help with essay writing and test preparation for the entrance tests like SAT and ACT and also the GRE for those seeking a graduate education. The student's investment in time and money does pay off. Student loans are available at 7% and 9%, which is much less than the amount of increase in salary which a degree makes possible. However, that said, it is important that the student do some research on the future of various career paths. Considering that we are in the worse economic situation since the Great Depression years, pursuing a degree in an obscure field does not make as much sense as pursuing a career in one of the "20 fields expected to grow in the next ten years". A rule of thumb is to borrow student loan money in an amount not to exceed one year's typical salary in the career being... read more

  For those of you who may have purchased Apple's spiffy $79 external CD/DVD burner (or Superdrive as they call it), it may not have worked when you plugged it into your older Mac. A lot of times a person's built-in optical drive fails, and they see the new external at the Apple Store. They naturally grab one assuming it'll work because they'll be using it with a Mac. Hopefully there's a "Genius" selling it to them who's going to ask which Mac they plan on using it with. I'd think probably not. It turns out it's only the fairly newer Macs that support it. When you plug it in, your older Mac might very well inform you that "This Apple External CD/DVD drive is not compatible with this Mac. Please go to Apple Support to read more." What they show you is a compatibility matrix that seems to makes no sense. I haven't compared every spec of every Mac they list, but 2009 seems to be the general cutoff.   Perhaps Apple requires USB 3, and... read more

NOTE: For today's Math Journey, please refer to the image file “Image for Math Journey: Road Trip Around A Problem” under my WyzAnt files. Link: https://www.wyzant.com/resources/files/671706/image_for_math_journey_road_trip_around_a_problem Let's go on a road trip! When I teach geometry, especially geometry involving angle measures like this problem, I like to describe the process of solving a problem as taking a little road trip. I describe it this way because this is how I personally feel when solving a problem like this – my eyes rove around the figure from one intersection to the next, and I hop in my little math car and drive along lines and stop at intersections to figure out where I am. Geometry is a very visual discipline, and as a visual learner, I have the most fun when I can trace a physical journey around the problem, solving things as I go. So let's hop in our math car and chase this problem down! The first step in any problem like... read more

Wyzant has a policy to allow new students to meet with a tutor of their choice and if they don't find the tutor meets their needs, they may contact another tutor without charge (as I understand it). This is a customer-friendly policy that makes students feel more comfortable in contacting a potential tutor. However, it works both ways. A tutor will also need to review the information a potential student provides to determine if possible how well the tutor can provide the help requested. The problem lies when the student gives no information.   When a student writes only "I need help", or "when can you meet", or writes no message at all, it is impossible for a tutor to determine if he/she can help. A tutor must determine the student's specific subject and area of need, level, school or work situation, possible schedule (e.g. evenings only), and other factors to see if he/she can help. It becomes a waste of time to write back and forth when the student... read more

I've been creating mad-libs to use with my middle school French students. If anyone else would like to use them, feel free. Many of them are created from non-copyrighted short stories, not my original writing.    Mad Lib 1   1. un mois 2. un profession 3. un lieu 4. une Fete 5. une chose 6. un verb avec ils 7. un prenom d'une femme 8. un verb avec elle 9. une chose pluriel 10. un verb avec elle Nous sommes en __________(1). Gilles est ________(2) dans un/une ________. C’est bientôt la __________ (4) et Gilles a acheté un nouvel ________ (5). « ____________ (4) est un lundi cette année », dit le _________ (2) à sa femme. Ensemble, ils _________ (6). La femme de Gilles s’appelle ________(7). Elle _________ (8) dans un magasin de décorations en ville. Durant le mois d’octobre, elle a souvent beaucoup de _______. L’automne est une période où _______(7) ________ (10) beaucoup.     Mad... read more

One of the things I love most about the Latin language is how its writers can massage it to add information and imagery without having to add more words.  I call this, personally, writing in two dimensions.  Here's an example:   At one point in the Aeneid, Aeneas and Dido are having a lovers' tryst in a hidden cave, which was dedicated to a god.  Because Latin is a highly inflected language, word order carries little grammatical information (unlike English), but can add quite a bit of what I call "two-dimensional" information.  So, in English the line might be written:   Aeneas and Dido were in the holy cave.   But Vergilius writes instead (only in Latin):   In the holy Aeneas and Dido were cave.   Thus, even in terms of word order, Aeneas and Dido are INSIDE the cave!  I find things like this absolutely thrilling.  But it's not my favorite half-line in Latin poetry.   That... read more

Infinity is a term with which most people are familiar, but few truly understand. Infinity is not an actual value, like the number 3 -- it is an abstract concept. In math terms, it is used as a "limit", where a value can approach infinity by getting continuously larger, but it will never actually get there. Consider the act of cutting a pizza into slices. You can cut it in half, then cut those halves in half, then cut those halves in half, etc. As the slices get smaller, the number of slices gets larger; therefore, as the size of each slice approaches zero, the number of slices approaches infinity. Again, in math terms, this means that as x approaches zero, the value of 1/x approaches infinity. Some go so far as to say that 1/0 equals infinity, but this would not be entirely correct; nothing can actually "equal" infinity, since it isn't a value, but an abstract limit that can only be "approached". Here's another example. You are standing a... read more

I recently had the experience of arranging to meet a new client's high-school student for their first time using online tutoring with me. We had already exchanged messages on the platform we intended to use in an attempt to ensure everything was ready for that night's session when the student would be ready.   However, we encountered some problems!  Although we were both logged into the video-conferencing application, and had earlier exchanged IMs through the application, neither of us appeared to be online to the other! After trying the usual restart-the application, restart-the-machine first trouble-shooting steps, to no avail I asked the client to try checking their application for any available updates.  Well, evidently there must have been some updates that hadn't run for quite some time (or perhaps an antivirus program or firewall interfered with the update process, or perhaps the operating system was out-of-date too, or ... could have been any number of... read more

My Cancellation Policy I consider time very valuable, both to me and to my students. In order to be a more effective tutor, I am implementing my cancellation policy as follows: - Student Cancels with more than 24 hours Notice: No fee - Student Cancels with 6-24 hours Notice: 1/2 price of session - Student Cancels with 1-6 hours Notice: Full price of session - Student no-show with No Notice: Full price of session and student may be dropped I am committed to providing an excellent experience during each tutoring session. I promise to value your time. In the unlikely event that I am late or need to cancel a session last-minute, I agree to the following: - I am more than 15 minutes late to session: Student charged 1/2 price of session and make-up time, if possible - I cancelled a session with less than 24 hours Notice: Next session is free   My schedule is very full, and I prefer to schedule my students on a certain day of... read more

Ellen's Rules for Effective Time Management, Part 2 3. Know when it’s time to take breaks. Spending a good chunk of time on one subject is good; it helps you settle into a rhythm and lets your brain get into the correct frame of reference for the subject. But there exists a horizon beyond which no progress can or will be made. It’s the point at which your brain has become over-saturated with the current material, and if you continue on you’ll just end up working yourself into circles of frustration. In paper writing, it’s the point at which anything you wrote would make sense to you regardless because you’ve been reading the same few paragraphs to yourself for hours. In math, it’s the point at which you will just end up confusing yourself more and more as you try desperately to work it out. When that moment arrives, you know it’s time to take your break. 4. TAKE BREAKS. I don’t care how much work you have, there’s always enough time for a fifteen-minute break... read more

I became pi day challenge genius #181 at 3:14 on Sunday :-) Less than an estimated 10% of those who play do all 37+ (some have groups of puzzles). You can still play at any time at pidaychallenge.com #pidaychallenge Pi Day Challenge throughout the year. They're not just math/physics puzzles.   Per the owner of the site, I calculated the genius percentage incorrectly.  About 10,000 people took the challenge, so becoming a “genius” is pretty rare.   One of my elementary age students this year started answering some of the hard ones even faster than I did. I don't know if he'll complete all the puzzles, but each year his lateral and creative thinking improves.  Having these extra-curricular activities helps youth have FUN!!!   Try a few out... even if you think you're stuck.  It's amazing what the brain can do with a good night's sleep. Barbara W.

The Seven Learning Styles Visual/Spatial:You prefer using pictures, images, and spatial understanding. Aural/Auditory: You prefer using sound and music. Kinesthetic/Physical: You prefer using your body, hands and sense of touch Verbal/Linguistic : You prefer using words, both in speech and writing. Solitary: You prefer to work alone and use self-study Social: You prefer to learn in groups or with other people. Logical/Mathematical: You prefer using logic, reasoning and systems.   The Seven Learning Styles Visual/Spatial:You prefer using pictures, images, and spatial understanding. Aural/Auditory: You prefer using sound and music. Kinesthetic/Physical:  You prefer using your body, hands and sense of touch Verbal/Linguistic : You prefer using words, both in speech and writing. Solitary: You prefer to work alone and use self-study Social: You prefer... read more

Good project ideas for rainy (or just lazy) weekends:     Have the kids read aloud to you. Choose a word that you think they may not know the definition. Then start a "Look up that word" game: I know some friends of mine who used to play this game often, I recall there were brothers and were very much into sports and competition, if they didn't know a word that was spoken or in their homework assignments, they would race to a dictionary to see who could find the meaning first. By the way, now they are articulate men with an awesome vocabulary! You can ask "Who can look this word up and create a sentence? The fastest one is a winner!" Some kids may not think this is too much fun at first so plan a preferred meal or movie as a reward! They may start to really enjoy the word race game over time as they play it!

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