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Meta-cognition is thinking about thinking, and higher levels tend to be associated with intelligence and - in the parlance of the times - high income and job satisfaction. So, to keep things simple: if you think that you might struggle with learning concepts in statistics or research methods, then get in touch with a tutor early. It's important to establish some type of relationship so you can evaluate their style, methods, and how likely it is that you'll be successful within their approach. If you wait too long, or right before an assignment is upon you, you may be stuck with a limited number of tutors that you are forced to work with.    Prevention through establishing early contact will help you iron out details, assess a match in learning and tutoring styles, and prepare for mastering any difficult concept.   Don't wait - contact tutors before it's too late!

I specialize in teaching essay structure and style. When I began tutoring, I had a vague idea that I'd work with college students like the friends for whom I'd proofread during university: young Americans who've grown up in a public school system which emphasized group work over individual learning, and who therefore never got a chance to develop their writing skills. I've certainly worked with students from a background very much like this. However, I've also had the pleasure of building a strong ESL clientele. At this point, I've spent enough time with ESL students to have made some observations about the nature of ESL learning and the way it is discussed. I'm certainly no expert, but by now I am a reliable dilettante. I speak with the authority of firsthand experience. From that vantage, I'd like to address one mistake which is frequently made in conversations about ESL learning. It is a very serious mistake and I have to believe that it muddles teachers' thinking considerably... read more

As a tutor, I enjoy helping students understand their assignments, improve their academic performance, or prepare for standardized tests, but I'd be hesitant to say I actually like standardized tests.   But I've tempered my perspective concerning standardized tests because of the revised Advanced Placement U.S. History exam.  It does have a multiple choice "just the facts" section, but now half of one's grade is based on the ability to demonstrate critical thinking, and applying one's knowledge and thinking creatively.   For example, the Document-Based Question essay provides five to seven primary sources: these could be Executive (Presidential) Orders, speeches, laws, political cartoons, photographs, propaganda posters, and images of historical artifacts. One sample question, which required that students develop an interpretation of the perceptual and cognitive mindset of American culture during the Cold War, had a reproduction of an advertisement... read more

Have you ever wondered what spelling bee champs know about spelling? I have, and my research led me straight to the 31 spelling rules as taught in the Logic of English method. These simple yet powerful rules explain 98% of English words when coupled with 74 phonograms. While that may not be enough to win an elite spelling bee, its a huge step forward for everyday literacy. The 31 rules are posted here: https://www.logicofenglish.com/resources/spelling-rules. While most are remarkably simple, they are quite powerful. Consider how the very first rule explains the answers to these tricky word equations: picnic + ing = picnicking notice + able = noticeable Rule 1 states that "C always softens to /s/ when followed by E, I, or Y. Otherwise, C says /k/." Thus, picnicking gets its K because without it, the word would say /picnising/. Likewise, noticeable retains its E because without it, the word would say /notikable/. I'd love... read more

Looking for a second pair of eyes to review your final research papers for this semester? Please review my profile and contact me. I have extensive experience working with ESL writers and I specialize in nursing school (through graduate level) research paper review. My schedule is flexible and I can coach any writer online as well as via email and in person.   With South University and UCF's nursing programs in Orlando, I have worked with many nurses in Central Florida who are struggling to attain a master's degree while working full-time in the nursing profession. Hats off to all health care professionals, but especially these dedicated men and women, who want to achieve higher education.  I also provide academic support online and via email for all writers for any writing project, creative and technical topics. Please review my profile for more details.    Contact me today to see how I can provide academic support during your graduate nursing career...

Want to be published? I am the editor of three on-line science journals, published through the CK-12 Foundation (www.ck12.org). These journals, Understanding Biodiversity, Profiles in Science (early 2016), and Current Trends in the Biomedical Sciences (late 2016) are opportunities for students to become published.  I am available to assist students nationwide through the research, writing and publishing process - just sent me an email to find out more.    

We've all had those days when the sun is shining beautifully, and we're stuck inside at a desk. Wouldn’t it be great to find places to write, or study, that actually capitalized on all that vitamin D and felt inspiring and comfortable enough for effective work?   Heck, yes!   Here are four outdoor venues that can help aid in creativity and success:   1. Coffee shops. Coffee and tea shops are great choices if you’re communal and don’t get too easily distracted by the hubbub. One suggestion is to claim a table outside—in the sunshine if you’re writing or in the shade if you’re on a laptop. This way, you get some fresh air and a taste of what’s going on in the world, yet there are less distractions.   2. Parks. Picnic blankets are your best friend when it comes to park writing time, as are big beach towels and camp chairs. Personally, with chronic back pain, I’ve laid out on a blanket in the sun for a good hour or two before rotating... read more

I’m not prone to exaggeration, but when it comes to the words moreover and furthermore, I can safely say that I would rather poke myself in the eye with a sharp stick if it meant that never again would I have to hear them misused in everyday English conversations with Russian speakers. I see why they come up so often. They both appear, on the surface, to be sweetly analogous to the often-used term ????? ???? and, to Russian speakers of English, it probably feels like it is a suitable upgrade from plain old ‘and’. The problem is that using them in everyday conversations can make you sound, at best, overblown or pretentious and, at worst, vaguely threatening. That said, as with everything, there is a time and a place for introducing these words. They carry with them, a level of accuracy in meaning which other ‘plainer terms, may not have. We just need to make sure that we understand exactly when and where to use the word; and that the right time and place is... read more

I recently reviewed a question someone had about strong verbs: is arranged a strong verb?   My answer was thus:    This is probably the wrong question to ask and strong is really a vague term in which to describe a verb - by strong, I assume you mean active. Typically we use active and passive to describe transitive and intransitive verbs. That is, verbs existing in a typical subject-verb-object relationship and that don't use auxiliary verbs as crutches. A transitive verb is one which is active. (Keep in mind, I'm simplifying that definition. There's more to a transitive verb than that). These are often stronger verbs. Many times they are violent. Active voice  has an agent, which is typically a subject, it has a "strong" verb, and it typically has an object. Here's a few sample sentences where active (transitive) verbs are used:   1. Sally hit Tom. 2. Bill shot the dog. 3. I sent a message to my grandmother. Those... read more

1) THE BASE: Ask yourself where you want to start. A building is strongest and most stable at the base. So that being said, you want to build a strong and stable foundation on the subject you want to learn. Concepts, rules, understanding play a big role when learning a subject. Grasping the fundamental ideology of a subject is the beginning of formulating the bases of understanding the core concepts. So in other words get a general picture of the subject and read the history behind it.   2) START SMALL BUT BROAD: Every subject has a broad category and a specific category. The more in-depth you go, the more confusing it can become if you don't have the general knowledge or a broad understanding of that subject. For example, you're not going to understand Calculus 2 without learning Calculus. Or understand how your brain creates memories or thoughts without understanding neurons. So by researching, reading, and analyzing the broad categories of the subject you can learn... read more

1) THE BASE: Ask yourself where you want to start. A building is strongest and most stable at the base. So that being said, you want to build a strong and stable foundation on the subject you want to learn. Concepts, rules, understanding play a big role when learning a subject. Grasping the fundamental ideology of a subject is the beginning of formulating the bases of understanding the core concepts. So in other words get a general picture of the subject and read the history behind it.   2) START SMALL BUT BROAD: Every subject has a broad category and a specific category. The more in-depth you go, the more confusing it can become if you don't have the general knowledge or a broad understanding of that subject. For example, you're not going to understand Calculus 2 without learning Calculus. Or understand how your brain creates memories or thoughts without understanding neurons. So by researching, reading, and analyzing the broad categories of the subject you can learn... read more

One of the difficulties with the English language is that there are often multiple ways to represent the same sound. For example the long a sound can be seen as <ai> as in rain or <ay> as in play. It can also be spelled as just an <a> or in the combination of <a> consonant <e>, such as lane. Then there is the allusive <eigh> as in neighbor or weigh. The process of spelling is hearing a sound, then making a choice on what graphic representation (letter, or letters) will spell that word correctly. Sometimes we choose incorrectly.    There are two methods I use that help with spelling. One is the Orton-Gillingham method. This looks at syllables to determine pronunciation. They are rules, such as <ay> is used at the end of a word, like play, way, say. The other method focuses on looking at the meaning of a word and determining the pronunciation after the meaning is gathered. This method addresses all the words we can "weird"... read more

This piece was originally written for a composition teaching journal in April 2015.    Considerable hullabaloo accompanies what some deem incorrect usage of language. Seriously, did he just write hullaballoo in an academic piece? Hopefully you see what I mean. Seriously, did he just use second person? Is he engaging in meta-discourse? Composition instructors, some of whom might have throated some deep consternation in the opening lines of this discussion, tend to face the expectation that they erect themselves on mountains among a network of so-called authorities on the English language, and from such heights, prescribe, as a doctor would medication, remedies for the “diseases” of the English language. For these administrators and “language mavens” alike, one of the principle concerns of the 21st century—the age of text messages and tweets—is the shortage of correct grammar, correct, of course, in terms of standards often set by the same group of people. This, I posit,... read more

Yes, there is a cure for dyslexia. However, the cure is unreachable for most students. Every child facing the dyslexia label needs an individual "toolbox" with unlimited learning supplies. Those "toolbox" supplies need to be (1) whatever teaching methods (even sometimes) make learning easier for that child, (2) unlimited access to educators whose primary concern is raising the student's self esteem, (3) a waiver from having to read aloud or do math problems in front of the entire class, (4) unlimited access to pictures, stories, and hands-on activities, (5) unlimited access to appropriate technology, (6) information broken into smaller parts and/or color-coded, (7) notes, formulas, word-banks, mnemonics, modified assignments, and (8) a total acceptance of outside the box (giving the student the benefit of the doubt) types of problem solving.   Educational challenges come in about as many shapes and sizes as there are children in schools. The "One... read more

While I, as a writer, very much enjoy the act of putting pen to paper (or fingers to keyboard, more likely), I understand not everyone is as inclined. In fact, writing can be a very tedious task if you're not invested in your writing, whether an inbox full of emails that need responses or a 10-page paper. But I have a few quick tips that will hopefully make writing more fun for everyone! Write to a soundtrack. Now, this tip may not be for everyone, as some people find it very hard to focus with any kind of distraction. But I find that music playing softly in the background while I type away takes some of the pressure of what I'm doing, as I'm less likely to track the minutes I spend staring at the same sentence if I have a song giving my work flow and momentum. Pick whatever music you like, but I suggest nothing too catchy that you'll be tempted to stop writing and have a karaoke break. I have a playlist of music without words, which doesn't have to be all classical... read more

A friend of mine recently posed a question to me: "What exactly IS a career student? Is that the guy that has been in his senior year of high school since 2009?" No, young grasshopper, a career student is not that guy. That guy or girl is what we call a senior-senior, and he or she is usually a pretty awesome person that just really enjoys high school. I came up with the term "career student" (peep the tagline) in an effort to describe the types of high school and college students that might be interested in my services and/or what I hope students that use my services will become. A career student is a student that treats their academic life like a professional career. I know a lot of career students, and yes, you want to be one of them.  Career students have certain qualities that they have acquired with lots of effort and support. Anyone can be a career student (even people that HATE school). A lesson I learned after high school... read more

Hi all!   If you're reading this then you probably just got the same nasty surprise as I did earlier this month.  The ACT is changing the writing prompt starting in September, and students need to shift gears, A.S.A.P.!    What changed?   Let's start with timing. Students now get 40 minutes for the Writing Test.  They'll need the extra ten minutes, because the prompt, writing task, and planning stages have all been expanded.    remember the old prompt?  Sure, you've been teaching it up until a few hours, days, or maybe weeks ago.  It included 4-5 sentences on a subject having to do with education and schooling, subjects at the forefront of high school students' minds.  The first sentence introduced a problem faced by students or schools.  The second and third sentences introduced two sides of an argument, pro- and con-, and an argument supporting each side.  Finally, the prompt ended with a... read more

College application essays are one of my favorite assignments to work on with students. They are a chance for me to get to know my students better as we brainstorm topics for their personal essays. I get to hear about childhood memories, unique family traditions, and uncommon hobbies. I love helping students find their voice and tell their unique stories to colleges. My students do not share my enthusiasm for application essays. They feel immense pressure to produce their best pieces of writing to impress colleges. They have also probably heard vague tidbits of advice on how to accomplish this: stand out, don’t be cliché, and be interesting. It’s no wonder that a lot of students have trouble finding a place to start. Here are a few tips to make college application essays less scary: 1. Reading other essays: Read other well-written college application essays. Many colleges release strong application essays from previous years. Reading an array of these essays... read more

I recently published a new book - a collection of haiku.   A Good Day to Die is a collection of haiku in traditional form, written by acclaimed author Carl Weaver. The subjects of his works are traditional – nature, seasons, animal life, other people, changing emotional state – but also include some poems of passion and romance.   This was done all in Microsoft Word - a full-length book manuscript. Easy to do if you know how. Need help putting your project together? Let me know and I can help you out.

For parents  -- and tutors looking for tips -- I am interested in speaking with you about your tutoring needs, or plans. I live conveniently, in Newton Centre, and have worked with many high school students in the greater Boston area. My students (and their parents)  are very enthusiastic about my special technique. The methods I use include some of the following: reading for speed, reading for context, skimming, customized exercises, quizzes designed by me, alternative study styles, and more.    My students have shown dramatic improvement on the SAT and ACT, as well as in English class, and in their ability to communicate well in writing. This is a skill that will carry them through many college assignments, and I teach my students to edit their own writing.   After evaluating each student's reading and writing level, I adapt my curriculum to account for their weakest areas.  The topics we may cover include analytical writing, composition,... read more

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