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SAT PREP! As a seasoned SAT tutor, my students have informed me of many different online resources for SAT prep. Some have been quite useful, while others are not so much. In this post, I will rank 5 resource links to SAT review websites or apps that I find helpful in preparing for the SAT. Keep in mind that these resources may be immensely helpful but are not perfect solutions for stand-alone SAT preparation. The best SAT preparation is done with a live tutor who is knowledgable about the SAT itself and about the different strategies for test-taking that work best for each individual.   Top 5 SAT Prep Resources 1. CollegeBoard.com's  full practice SAT exam is the very first place every student should begin. Who better to provide SAT test prep, than the makers of the SAT?! 2. INeedAPencil is a great free resource for an entire comprehensive prep program funded by the CK-12 Foundation. 3. Number2 is another free resource with an all... read more

1. Hyperphysics This website is basically a concept map of every physics topic, and I mean every. It's not a comprehensive guide to all of them, but it provides a basic overview of pretty much everything you could ever want to know about physics. It's not a "Physics for Dummies" site, so if you're struggling, you'll still need a competent tutor. That being said, if you want to look up and equation or definition, or just learn a little more about something your teacher only mentioned, it is the best resource I know.   2. Paul's Online Math Notes This website offers extremely detailed lessons on Algebra, Calculus I, II, and III, and Differential Equations. To be honest, I learned most of what I know about Calculus through Paul, not my professors. I'll even admit that many students can use this in place of a tutor. Paul's teaching style isn't for everyone, though, so many people will still need some extra help.   3. SparkNotes... read more

I couldn't solve an SAT math problem (farmer picking pumpkins of the right weight and asking what ranges will he NOT pick) where I manipulated the word problem on a number line graph to give  x<2 and x>10.  I was asked to pick the answer that could be the correct one.   The answers I had to choose from were in the form of absolute value inequality equations, I solved all five answers and found that the answer (D)  |x-6| >4  was the correct answer.  This is one way to do this, grunt work/crank it out, but I want to explain to my student (AND MYSELF) how to do it analytically.   It appears that what I want to do is generate an absolute value inequality equation from data, seems simple enough, but I cannot find any references on the internet where this is done, it's always the other way.   Can someone explain to me the logic of how to do it?   From looking at the steps I went through to solve the answer... read more

I am currently teaching SAT courses in the Bay Area, and a lot of students have been enrolling in my math classes.   I wanted to summarize what I think are important aspects of test preparation, as this crucial testing period begins:   1) Know the format of the test 2) Understand how the guessing penalty affects your strategy (e.g. a person scoring a 500 has a different strategy than someone scoring a 700 in math) 3) Do at least 15 practice problems per day. 4) Try to do a full length practice SAT every 3 weeks 5) Target your areas of weakness (and know what your weaknesses are) 6) Don't rush during the test. Rushing only leads to careless mistakes. 7) Be open to new strategies. Sometimes, the way we do things might get us to the right answer, but there may be a more efficient way. The SAT isn't just about accuracy - it's about doing things efficiently. 8) Know your strategies of last resort. Plugging in the answer choices is a... read more

Hi! I'm Jennifer J.,  B.S., MEd, JD, PHD ABD WyzAnt Tutor In my blog I will tell you everything you need to know about the "start-to-finish" process of preparing and taking the SAT and ACT exams. that will get you into the college or university of your choice.    Some Background About Me: I teach classes and tutor privately for the PSAT, SAT and ACT. I have taught these test preparation classes since 1999. I taught for Princeton Review, and then started my own business, Pathfinders College Preparatory. Since then, I have amassed my own collection of actual SAT tests, answer sheets, practice material, etc. I work with anywhere from one to four students at a time. I will tutor you privately in your home or at another location.   Commonly Asked Q & As:   Below are some commonly asked questions and answers about preparing for the SAT, the PSAT, and the ACT exams:     Q:... read more

  With the wealth of SAT prep materials out there, it can be tough to find the best resources for SAT study. I've been tutoring for the SAT for over a decade, and these are the materials I've found to be the most helpful.     SAT General Study   For all-around SAT preparation, nothing beats The Official SAT Study Guide, published by the College Board. With ten full practice tests, this book contains plenty of study material for all sections of the test. Because the questions are written by the College Board and, in many cases, have appeared on actual administered SATs, they accurately reflect what students will see on test day. (I've never found a test written by a third-party company that comes close to matching actual SAT questions, and I do not recommend third-party practice tests for study.) Working through the questions in this book is the best, most effective way for any student to prepare for the test.   In addition... read more

Aaah...the the most feared, loathed, avoided tests of the century: the PSAT, SAT, and ACT.   I am here to tell you that you should not let these tests overpower you. A bad first score is not enough to tell your potential. You are capable of improving leaps and bounds, perhaps hundreds of points.   Take my younger brother, for example. He took the PSAT his freshman year with no prior exposure to the test and received a 153. He was not happy with his score, so I told him he would have to practice greatly to improve. With my help tutoring him in math and writing, he was able to improve his SAT score to 1820 his sophmore year. That is a 290 point increase! Using the big blue SAT practice book, he took many practice tests to help him get comfortable with the test format. I went over the questions he got wrong, so he could learn from his mistakes and not make the same mistake the next time. The SAT Question of the Day was another helpful tool he used that was... read more

Good luck to all students taking the SAT this morning!  Remember: they're trying to trip you up, so watch your feet!   Don't feel like you did your best?  Anxious about how many questions you skipped?  Don't worry, there are more test dates this year.  Many people take the SAT multiple times, and if you get some tutoring in between (from yours truly!), you can dramatically increase your scores on the second time through.   The remaining test dates for the current school year are:   January 25 March 8 May 3 June 7 I recommend you start studying for the SAT at least one month in advance, longer if you plan on going it without a tutor. If you'd like to work with me for the January or March test cycle, send me an email ASAP. The sooner we can get to work, the higher your scores will be!

Did you take the SAT on Saturday?  Are you freaking out about how confusing it was, and feeling like you had no idea what you were doing?  Never fear; many people take the SAT's multiple times, and if you get a little tutoring help in between (from yours truly) you can radically improve your score on the second go-around.   Here's the remaining test dates for the 2013-2014 school year:   November 2 December 7 January 25 March 8 May 3 June 7   I recommend you start studying for the SAT at least one month in advance, longer if you plan on going it without a tutor.  If you'd like to work with me for the November or December test cycle, send me an email ASAP.  The sooner we can get to work, the higher your scores will be!

The SAT messes with your head. Don't feel embarrassed, it messes with everyone's head. It's designed to. The SAT is a test of your critical reasoning skills, meaning it's actually far more about logic and figuring out the correct course of action than it is about actually knowing the material. This is nowhere more evident than on the Math section. The SAT Math trips up so many students because they expect it to behave like a math test. The truth is, the SAT Math is about figuring out how to answer each problem using as little actual math as possible. It's all about working quickly, and the questions are structured such that they conceal the quick logic and context-based route behind the facade of a more complicated math question. They're trying to psych you out; to make you think the problem is harder than it is. In math class you're taught to be thorough, to show your work and not leave out any steps. On the SAT, it's... read more

Let's look at where we are with this test, in a brief history of personal math. First was one, "me" and utilizing the survival instincts to draw on the provider instincts of guardians. Next was outside objects. The ones that were NOT edible became a basis of attention, combining by grouping or stacking, or rejecting as undesirable due to being useless or even dangerous. Further along, those objects came to be more easily considered when represented by marks on paper, beginning the abstract thought processes we call addition and subtraction. Then, the abstracts were further manipulated by multiplication and division, now a full four steps away from actually requiring the physical presence of an object. Acceptance of the principles of Algebra made it possible to continue the development by substituting variables or even unknown values and contriving valuable relations between them to further ideas. We are now at the precipice of the next level: being able to see how the processes... read more

Answer the Question: On the SAT math section, it is very important to carefully read the question and be aware of what exactly it is asking. Not following this simple strategy could unnecessarily cost you valuable points. To illustrate, here is an example: If 3x + 2y = 19, and 2x + 4y = 18, what is the value of x + y? (A) 2 (B) 4 (C) 5 (D) 7 (E) 8 In this question, it is very tempting to solve for x or y and then hastily pick answer choice A (y = 2) or answer choice C (x = 5). It is important to notice that the question is asking for x + y, which would give you 2 + 5 = 7 (answer choice D). This strategy can be applied to the math section of most standardized tests, and occasionally to other sections as well.

Well, we're getting down to the wire in terms of my departure for Japan. I will be leaving for Japan to start my Master's in classical Japanese literature on the 16th of September, which means I only have 6 more weeks to fit in students. Since my standard SAT course is 20 hours, this is really the last week that I'd feel comfortable starting a normal course where we meet two or three times a week (depending on 2 or 1 1/2 hour lessons). Any later than that and I would worry about being able to finish before I leave the country. So if you're interested in an SAT course, please let me know as soon as possible. Intensive courses will still be available for a couple more weeks (where we meet for long 6 or 7 hour stretches over a few days) but with many school districts starting in the next couple weeks, it will become harder and harder even to fit those in. Thank you all for your patronage, and keep "studying smart, not hard."

As the school year ramps up again, I wanted to put out a modified version of a Memo of Understanding http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Memo_of_understanding for parents and students. It seems each year in the rush to get through the first weeks of school parents and students forget the basic first good steps and then the spiral downwards occurs and then the need for obtaining a tutor and then the ‘wish for promises’ from a tutor. Pay attention to your child’s folder or agenda book. A student is generally not able to self regulate until well into high school. Some people never quite figure it out. Be the best person you can be by helping your child check for due dates, completeness, work turned in on time. Not only will this help your child learn to create and regulate a schedule, it prevents the following types of conversations I always disliked as a teacher ("Can you just give my child one big assignment to make up for the D/F so they can pass"; "I am going to talk to... read more

Developing a grounded understanding of numbers, and number operations provides the firmest foundation for learning math. Touching, seeing, and manipulating physical objects are perhaps the surest way to accomplish that in the beginning. Developing the practice of drawing pictures to reflect an arithmetic or story problem is the next step and soon becomes a central tool for thinking through a math problem whether represented in math and science, or encountered in life. Finally, talking about, through, and around math, arithmetic, problems, and solutions is equally important to proficiency in math and any other area of education, socialization, and life. It is important to recognize the preferred learning style of each student in order to achieve the best opportunity to that student’s learning and performance. Yet, excellent teaching includes multiple approaches and learning styles on the way to each student’s full facility, proficiency, and confidence. This necessary aim... read more

I was a fairly typical young person and, like my peers, counted down the days until summer. My mother was a math professor, so I never stopped doing math during the summer, but felt like other parts of my brain became a little mushy in the summer. Come September, it was difficult to get back into the swing of writing papers and studying history and memorizing diagrams. I was out of practice and lost my routine. As an adult, I have almost continually taken classes, because I enjoy learning and find that from class to class, I need to maintain a routine, i.e. a study area and a time of day that I complete my assignments. I have also found that reviewing material a week or two before the course begins helps me to start the class with more confidence and competence. I am a big believer in confidence fueling success and I wonder if younger students practiced assignments in the week or two prior to return to school, if that confidence would help the transition to the school year routine... read more

I was excited on Tuesday, July 16th, 2013. This was my third meeting with this student and I finally had a breakthrough with him. On the first meeting it was clear that he saw Algebra I almost as a foreign language. I began with one of the test packet, and had him do 10 questions and reviewed the questions he had done wrong. So this continued for a while, and of course sometimes he would say that he understood, but it was clear that he did not. Anyway, after reviewing the entire packet I began a teach and learn session, in which I picked a variety of topics and had him practice various equations. After which I gave him a quiz. He failed the quiz miserably, so of course he still did not understand. Anyway, I gave him another packet for homework. When I saw the student again, I reviewed with him, but still not much improvement, but at least he tried. I did the teach and learn session again, of which some of the questions were from the previous session, and I gave him the same... read more

Are you sitting by the pool with your feet up every day? Working a summer job to pay for penny candy and movie shows? (Yes, I know penny candy costs a dollar now.) The summer is closer to being over than you think. Now would be a good time to start studying for the SAT or any other test you have coming up in the fall. You do not have to study all summer long, but get into the practice of doing one hour per day of intense studying and then, when the test comes around, you will be all the more ready for it. Studying even a little bit adds up. It is like going to the gym or practicing for the big game. The more you do it, the greater your chance of success. Now is a great time to start. So what are you waiting for?

When I was studying to be a teacher, one of the classes I had to take was Literacy in Secondary Education. Since the word literacy is associated to reading and writing by most, it would strike many as a surprise that Math teachers have to take courses on literacy. However, literacy is the most practical and crucial aspect of ANY academic discipline, simply because it involves the ability to read and write in said subject. For mathematics, it could not be anymore important. If you cannot understand the words that I am using, then it is almost as if we were communicating to each other in different languages. So whatever subject you are studying, I suggest you learn its vocabulary. As the helpful tutor that I am, I will share a list of vocabulary terms that was distributed in my literacy class to all of you so that you can check your own vocabulary. Keep in mind that this is considered to be the Mathematics vocab that one should know by the time they finish high school... read more

Hey everyone! I just recently graduated from Stanford University this June and I will be home in Arizona for the rest of the summer! If any of you need tutoring help in SAT, ACT, or a variety of Math, Science, and Verbal subjects feel free to contact me! I try to make our tutoring sessions as productive and fun as possible, while ensuring that you reach your academic goals! I am also open to helping you navigate your college or carer goals! Let me know if you would like to work with me! Best, Jayce

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