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This is advice that I always give to my students for the in-person classes that I teach. In order to excel in any subject that one is learning, it is important that you do the following: Go to class every day. Missing classes (whether they are in-person or online) is missing opportunities to learn! Do your homework. Complete the assignments that you are given. Instructors give assignments not to torture you, but to help reinforce what you learned in class. Remember, practice makes perfect. Practice what you've learned everywhere that you can. This is especially important for language learners. Read, write, and speak the language that you are learning at home and work. Take the extra time to make "self-assignments" and use what you know. Practice helps you progress faster. Keep a journal of what you learned. Learning journals are a wonderful tool as you can use them for both note-taking and motivation. Start by making a few short notes about what you... read more

What do we mean when we say that we are in or at a place? These two small words can be instrumental in helping us to reveal (and conceal) exactly where we are in the world and, crucially, how we feel about being there. Take the sentence, 'I'm at school'. Seemingly simple on the surface, but can't we say, 'I'm in school' too? So, if they both sound fine, why does 'I'm in/at classroom' sound bad? Lets look a little closer. In for buildings and rooms This is not a difficult one. If we use in, we are referring to the fact that we are in a place which has walls, a floor, and a ceiling. It can be a room, it can be a building, it can be a cardboard box at the side of the road. It depends on how much money your parents are investing in your education. The thing to remember is that, unlike at, we must use an article here to specify the space we are talking about. However, the days of a one-room village school are long gone and so it would be odd to hear ‘I’m in the school’... read more

So, we’ve explored the idea of in and at as ways to describe where we are and what we are doing there and found that it's a little bit more than just buildings and borders. In this post, we'll take a look at how using or omitting articles can help us to express how we feel about the places we are in. Before we begin, let's agree that articles are pretty much the most horrendous part of the English language, especially for Russian speakers. Rather than simple functional devices which can help us build more meaningful sentences, they seem to have more in common with capricious women, drunk on the power of being able to alter their surroundings with the merest flutter of an eyelash. To help us understand them better, I've compiled a series of examples to illustrate exactly how these devices operate. Omitting articles So, we already know that omitting articles is fine when we are talking in terms of our involvement in a process (I'm in school/court/), or our... read more

Yes, there is a cure for dyslexia. However, the cure is unreachable for most students. Every child facing the dyslexia label needs an individual "toolbox" with unlimited learning supplies. Those "toolbox" supplies need to be (1) whatever teaching methods (even sometimes) make learning easier for that child, (2) unlimited access to educators whose primary concern is raising the student's self esteem, (3) a waiver from having to read aloud or do math problems in front of the entire class, (4) unlimited access to pictures, stories, and hands-on activities, (5) unlimited access to appropriate technology, (6) information broken into smaller parts and/or color-coded, (7) notes, formulas, word-banks, mnemonics, modified assignments, and (8) a total acceptance of outside the box (giving the student the benefit of the doubt) types of problem solving.   Educational challenges come in about as many shapes and sizes as there are children in schools. The "One... read more

I offer every student and/or every parent to rate my lessons. As a result, quality of my lessons is not that hard to guess. I offer the most respectful attitude to my clients. The result of that attitude is a very positive feedback. I like to tutor people of any age. The result of that is a wide range of student from various communities. I love to explain and converse with my clients instead of telling them what to do. The result is they want me back. I do not like procrastinators. The result is there is no blame game.

From my experience, designing a lesson for one student could be challenging due to not being able to include group or pair-work, which is not only a great way for the students to apply what they have just learned with a fellow classmate allowing them to feel more comfortable to make mistakes but also gives the teacher the opportunity to walk around and listen in and find common errors that can be brought up to the class as a whole instead of singling out a single student's mistake possibly discouraging them, but also because after some time the student can easily get bored deterring them from fully learning the material the tutor is teaching. Here are five things I include in each lesson to ensure that the student is actively learning and having a fun time doing so as well.   1) Make your first lesson informal so they feel comfortable with you from the get-go. They will be hesitant until they feel it is okay to mistakes and the sooner you can get them to let their guard... read more

Using unusual resources make my tutoring lessons more fun.  Especially when teaching ESL, using Netflix or FireStick to call up particular shows in English that interest my students (I use their suggestions) are very useful while providing the motivation needed for language learning in the moment.  The students want to know it all--idioms, American or British common sayings, and more vocabulary that can be learned in a single lesson at times.   I always bring my tablet and a hotspot if there is no WiFi to use this fun tool.

Here is information on what I do, how I bill, and what I need from you. Feel free to read the entire blog, or just skim the bold headings until you see the type of proofreading you need. I look forward to working with you! For $5 per unit, I will do the following: Proofread your paper for grammar, spelling, and punctuation. ($5 per 1200 words)  Provide notes explaining the changes I suggest. Make these changes (tentatively) in your paper and mark them in red print. I am: Certified in Teaching English as a Second Language Experienced in proofreading college-level academic writing, having done so as an employee of a nearby college and as a professional tutor Ethical and attentive to detail How it works: Message me and let me know what you are looking for in a proofreader. See the “extras” below for more options, and let me know if you need a service that is not listed. Charges: o $5 per 1200 words for basic... read more

I suppose I should dedicate this space to an introduction, to give you an idea of what I offer, moreso than just the basic profile.   I am very passionate about education. I suppose I always have been--something my mother instilled in me--but in the last few years I have begun working in that realm. I have been an in home tutor, substitute teacher, and worked with non profits as a teacher and tutor. Maybe a bit off of the beaten path, but I feel that going a non traditional route has given me more hands on, real world, practical knowledge.   I am adept at working with limited English speakers, which I feel gives me an edge. I have worked with children and adults alike in this area, and am always looking to do more work with refugees, especially.   I also have a lot of customer service experience, which at first glance may not seem important. To me, it is a very important and influential part of how I handle teaching. Rather than "customers"... read more   Are you looking to learn English as a second language? Or do you want to learn Chinese? Whether you are a college student learning English or a professional seeking to learn Mandarin Chinese, I can help you make real progress in the language learning process. As a native speaker of English, I have lived abroad and experienced what it's like to learn a second language. in the process I have gained many insights into the language learning process and this experience has better prepared me to help tutor students seeking to learn English. If you're seeking to learn Mandarin, I understand where you're coming from and I share your native language and cultural perspective so that I can explain things to you in a way you will understand. I can also share tips for helping you to learn Mandarin. For Chinese-speaking students learning English I can explain difficult concepts to you... read more

       Book, books... Table, tables... Phone, phones... Day, days... So... life, lifes, right? Nope! The plural of life is lives. And, isn't the plural of sheep sheeps? Nope! The plural of sheep is sheep. It's the same word.      Have you ever wondered how to handle all of the rules and exceptions to rules in the English language? Here is an introduction (a beginning) to understanding the rules about plural nouns. Hopefully, it will make figuring out how to change that word less of a guessing game and more of a skill. '   Plurals What is a plural noun? A plural noun is a person, place, or thing of which there is more than one. Example: If there is more than one phone, they are called phones. When should I make a noun plural? Make a noun plural when there is more than one of what that noun represents How do I make a noun plural? Usually,... read more

I have been involved education as long as I can remember. My parents were educators. They helped start a school, were on the board of another, and were founding board members of the North Dakota Home School Association. I started teaching at the age of thirteen, as a volunteer. I have taught professionally, for over fourteen years. I have coached soccer. I co-founded a school and taught a wide array of subjects there for three years, including Latin, Rhetoric, General Science, and History. For nearly twelve years, I have been an education consultant, tutor, and mentor. I am prepared to tutor students in all subjects through high school, and I am well-versed in ACT and SAT preparation. I also do some college-level tutoring, particularly in English, Writing, Study Skills, and other humanities-related subjects. Feel free to ask for more details. I tutor adult students in a variety of subjects, and I have also had success in the past working with students who have a variety of... read more

Here's an idea for listening and speaking skills. Have ESL students watch (or record and watch) the TV show Jeopardy. (Channels and times will vary depending on where you live.   The benefits?     1) Since it's a quiz show, the prompts are spoken clearly and somewhat more slowly than normal conversation.     2) The prompts themselves are displayed on the screen and can be read.     3) Since the show is pre-recorded, close captioning for prompts and responses is accurate, complete, and well-synchronized with the spoken matieral.     4) Responses to the prompt must be phrased as QUESTIONS. Many ESL speakers have difficulty with forming questions in English and here they are hearing that done correctly over and over.     5) The material may expand students' knowledge of U.S. culture.

Si necesita aprender Ingles, you puedo aydarle. Tengo mi certificaciòn del segundo nivel para enseñar Ingles a personas que no hablen Ingles. Mis lecciones son en Ingles, pero ofrezco algunas explicaciones en Español. No hablo español fluidez, pero la familia de mi novio es de Mexico y en mi iglesia, se hable Español. Yo puedo comunicarse, pero mi Español tiene errores. Si mis lecciones le interesan, puede mirar a mi profile or puede escribirme por mas informaccion en Español.

I have found that many students know the words because they understand it by using it. However, they often do not know how to read the word. Please check out this amazing site that will use videos in sentences to teach over 1,000 words.  There are so many ways this site can prepare your child for reading.   ESOL see below

What is ESL?   ESL stands for English as a Second Language. While this has been the standard acronym for years, there are other acronyms that are associated with this particular field.    ELL - English Language Learner - This refers to students in ESL programs. Generally, it is an umbrella abbreviation for any learner of English whose native language is not English.    TEFL - Teachers of English as a Foreign Language - This refers to instructors who teach ELLs. You will commonly see this abbreviation used more than others. See also TESL and TESOL.   TESL - Teachers of English as a Second Language - Refers to ESL instructors.   TESOL - Teacher of English to Speakers of Other Languages - Refers to ESL instructors.    ESOL - English for Speakers of Other Languages - This actually refers to the English language itself; not the instructor.  Now that we have the basic acronyms out of... read more

Hi Students!   I hope you are enjoying the process of learning English. English can be a hard language to learn, even for native speakers. So here are some study tips and resources for you to use when you are studying for a test:         1. Make flashcards - write the vocab word on the front and the definition on the back. With this method,               you can quiz yourself.   2. Take practice quizzes - make a few practice quizzes for yourself using questions or information from other lessons. If you would like me to make a practice quiz for you, please send me an email!   3. Try to use English as much as possible - if you live with someone or have a friend who speaks               English, practice speaking with them. Try to speak English for at least one hour everyday outside of                 your lessons... read more

Now that its getting warmer this summer, many of us our spending more time watching TV. But how can watching TV help to improve our English/ESL skills?   One way is to mute the TV and display the closed captioning at the bottom of the screen. That way, you can practice reading English and still enjoy catching up on your favorite shows.   Let me know how it works for you, and have a great summer!

Many people, myself included, feel that for all its advantages, the internet has precipitated a steady decline in the quality of writing. Anyone can write anything anywhere, and while that gives a voice to many who otherwise might not have a public forum to share what they have to say, it also makes it difficult and sometimes impossible to uphold any sort of standards.   That said, the internet also offers plenty of resources for improving your writing. Here are a few of my favorites: Here you'll also find a thesaurus and several other reference tools. It may not be the Oxford English Dictionary, but it gives you plenty of good definitions and sometimes includes usage notes with practical implications for your writing, like differences in how similar words are typically used.   Difference Between Speaking of differences, this is a really cool site. As its... read more

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