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Well, hello!  My name is Kristina and I'm new to WyzAnt.  I decided to start this endeavor because I love English, I love learning, and I love that feeling when you finally grasp a concept.  As a tutor, I can share my love for all of these things.  I'm new to this, but I'm looking forward to the challenge and the adventure.   WyzAnt wants to know what my five outside the box tips that make my tutoring lessons fun?   1. Music.  I like to relate everything to music.  Whether it be lyrics or overall themes, connecting pop culture with literary pieces always helps to with retention.   2. Smiling.  There's a lot of smiling going on in my lessons.  Confidence isn't always easy, but if you start with a smile, you're half way there.   3. Social Media.  We're going to be using social media to find relevant topics to discuss and connect with your readings and writings.  I'm going to show you... read more

F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby presents the dark side of the American Dream and does so with unusual panache. The shimmering surface of Fitzgerald's prose style mirrors the daylight optimism of the dream, reflecting the ideal of a society wherein talent and hard work routinely get rewarded and upward mobility is based at least as much on merit as on luck or charm or who you know. Ruthlessness or deceit … but who could need such things? The narrator, Nick Carraway, likewise begins this adventure with a fair measure of this robust American optimism. He envies the high society spoons in his new top drawer of polished acquaintances, interpreting their frivolity and hedonism as an abundance of life. Yet as the narrative progresses, this bright-eyed optimism dims. Nick sees, on the one hand, heirs to inherited wealth who are arrogant, bigoted, selfish, and only superficially cultured – Tom Buchanan and his ilk. On the other hand, he sees those who are... read more

While I, as a writer, very much enjoy the act of putting pen to paper (or fingers to keyboard, more likely), I understand not everyone is as inclined. In fact, writing can be a very tedious task if you're not invested in your writing, whether an inbox full of emails that need responses or a 10-page paper. But I have a few quick tips that will hopefully make writing more fun for everyone! Write to a soundtrack. Now, this tip may not be for everyone, as some people find it very hard to focus with any kind of distraction. But I find that music playing softly in the background while I type away takes some of the pressure of what I'm doing, as I'm less likely to track the minutes I spend staring at the same sentence if I have a song giving my work flow and momentum. Pick whatever music you like, but I suggest nothing too catchy that you'll be tempted to stop writing and have a karaoke break. I have a playlist of music without words, which doesn't have to be all classical... read more

Never have I ever done a tutoring job like this before.  I am looking forward to partaking in this website and venture as a side job because it seems like a reasonable way to generate income on the side without stressing yourself out. I'm looking forward to teaching kids and passing on my knowledge of subjects through tips and tricks to make their learning easier, like it did for myself.  Most of all, I can't wait to see the results from my students when they receive their grades or start to perform better at the sports I coach them in.

For parents  -- and tutors looking for tips -- I am interested in speaking with you about your tutoring needs, or plans. I live conveniently, in Newton Centre, and have worked with many high school students in the greater Boston area. My students (and their parents)  are very enthusiastic about my special technique. The methods I use include some of the following: reading for speed, reading for context, skimming, customized exercises, quizzes designed by me, alternative study styles, and more.    My students have shown dramatic improvement on the SAT and ACT, as well as in English class, and in their ability to communicate well in writing. This is a skill that will carry them through many college assignments, and I teach my students to edit their own writing.   After evaluating each student's reading and writing level, I adapt my curriculum to account for their weakest areas.  The topics we may cover include analytical writing, composition,... read more

We all have one: that one subject that our brains just refuse to understand, and no matter how much we study or how hard we work, we never feel like we really truly GET what is going on.   For me, that subject was always Physics. No junior high or high school teacher could ever answer the unending string of "...but WHY?" questions that I needed answered before I could understand even the most basic concepts of our Introductory course. It wasn't that I couldn't understand, but rather that I wasn't being taught these ideas in a way that made sense to me.    As an adult, Physics is now actually one of my favorite subjects to read about because I have found some books written for people just like me, people who need explanations fulls of examples and explanations and lots of pictures! I may never discover black holes or split an atom, but I now know enough that I can understand the people who do those things. :-)     So,... read more

Here is information on what I do, how I bill, and what I need from you. Feel free to read the entire blog, or just skim the bold headings until you see the type of proofreading you need. I look forward to working with you! For $5 per unit, I will do the following: Proofread your paper for grammar, spelling, and punctuation. ($5 per 1200 words)  Provide notes explaining the changes I suggest. Make these changes (tentatively) in your paper and mark them in red print. I am: Certified in Teaching English as a Second Language Experienced in proofreading college-level academic writing, having done so as an employee of a nearby college and as a professional tutor Ethical and attentive to detail How it works: Message me and let me know what you are looking for in a proofreader. See the “extras” below for more options, and let me know if you need a service that is not listed. Charges: o $5 per 1200 words for basic... read more

I was asked once by a Japanese ELL (English Language Learner) how she could improve her speaking.  I told her that if you want to improve then you need to speak!  Talk to everyone.  Don't worry if you screw up or if your pronunciation isn't perfect.  The only way to become better at speaking a language, and to gain confidence, is to practice.   How does an ELL improve their speaking when they are living in a peripherary country?  A country where the language is not spoken as an official language?   That can be a bit more tricky, but immersion is not a guarantee that an ELL will gain proficiency in a language either.  I recommend finding an app or make an online friend that will give you opportunities to practice speaking.   I myself am a language learner.  I would like to go back to Japan and teach, but I would like to improve my speaking skills before I go.  I like using an app called Mango Languages. ... read more

It does happen sometimes- you've met a new student once, or twice, and they don't return. There are many possible reasons for this; it could be the tutor's approach, the student's expectations, or other external factors. This happened to me recently, despite all my tutoring experience, and I'll explain why. This college student came to me two days before an essay was due, with a poor first draft full of grammatical issues along with a poor grasp of the topic and supporting readings for it. She was desperate, and I believe expected me to just fix her paper for her. When I asked her how she deals with her second-language grammar problems, she explained that she uses an online program that supposedly corrects her grammar on her submitted draft. That is, she isn't really learning the grammar herself, but depending on a software program. In addition, she didn't grasp the admittedly-hard readings assigned in her text, and was very vague on her thesis. I reviewed the essay and suggested that... read more

I always stress the importance of organization and preparation with my students. Being consistent, clear, concise, and on time, are vital steps that will lead to a more effective and fulfilling learning experience. Ever sat through a class that was so boring you couldn't pay attention? Ever listened to an extensive lecture from a teacher with a dull, monotonous, voice? Aside from individual success, my main motive is to help others raise their self-confidence and self-esteem as much as possible; I plan to do this in an exciting manner that will keep your attention because it will be fun! Be open-minded, hopeful, have a sense of humor, and stay motivated! I look forward to meeting with you and syncing our experiences in a spontaneous manner! 

You have one hour with a college prep specialist who can help make your admissions/scholarship essays award winning.  How can you maximize your time?  Here are five tips to get the most out of your time:   Come Prepared. - Bring the essay prompts from each of your colleges.  Bring a sample personal statement and resume.  Be sure to have any information necessary to complete an admissions essay, to include your GPA, test scores, and any major accomplishments. Know Thyself - Always know your stats.  During this time, knowing your GPA and SAT score is as important as knowing your name and birthdate.  Also, know (and have a list of) your interests, hobbies, favorite subjects, etc.  Have an idea of at least 3 possible majors and careers you would like to explore. Be on Time - There is a lot to cover!  The better prepared and earlier you are, the more likely we are to get a lot done. Also, I tend to take my time... read more

Tonight I met with one of my students, who is in 6th grade, and we are working together to tackle proper essay structure.    This can be a tough issue for students, especially the really creative ones. These are the students that are FULL of ideas, and all of them are equally good, so why can't they just put them all into one essay or story? Trust me, it's not easy to kill your darlings, but it must be done (until you get a blog, of course).    In general, all essays, or even stories should be structured in a similar fashion: an introduction, a body, and a conclusion. Or, a beginning, a middle, and an end.    The introduction will include the visuals, the details to get the reader completely hooked into the story. If this is an analytical essay, the introduction will include the argument, or the point you're trying to prove.    Next comes the body, or the middle of the essay/story. This will typically be the longest... read more

I remember taking some courses in my early years of undergrad that were pretty awful. The teaching wasn't that bad, and I was definitely awake for them (two key points to getting decent grades) but the subject matter just wasn't something I could ever see myself using. Sound familiar?    Interestingly though, after changing my attitude, I saw that I can indeed use most things learned in most classes, if I am looking for the beneficial parts of each subject. I'm not saying that if you hate science you'll want to start studying the makeup of dirt all of a sudden, but I can definitely assure you that there is a way to dislike things less. We have to find ways to connect what math, science, English, or the like teaches us (even if it's under the surface) to what we love in life.    I love children with cancer. You can see more about that here. And even though I had to write that on the front of a lot of notebooks over... read more

Have you ever been in a situation when you have several alternatives for what you want to say in a second language but you are still not entirely sure which one to use? A lot of times, people find that they have several alternatives for what they want to say, and are not sure which one to choose for a particular situation. The good news for language learners is that its getting easier and easier to check exactly how to use a word correctly. Tools like corpora are becoming increasingly user-friendly and can be extremely useful for this. A corpus is a large set of linguistic data drawn from a particular area. This might be scientific journals, newspapers, novels, annual reports, or even conversation transcripts. To run a check on a corpus, simply write in your search term (go/salt/timely) and the corpus will show you the top 50 examples of this word in context. This means that one can easily read through and see not just the word, but the words which are most likely... read more

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