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At the beginning of my senior year of college, everyone was panicking about the possibility of not finding a job before graduation. Hence, job fairs were heavily attended. While attending a job fair hosted by the business school, I was encouraged to discuss finance positions at Abercrombie and Fitch by a recruiter. I decided I had nothing to lose and introduced myself. She then asked me what I scored on the SAT. Yes, she was referring to the exam that I took over five years ago. After awkwardly staring at her in disbelief, I answered her question and kindly ended the conversation. I do not agree with how the recruiter tried to put me in a box, but as Tupac said, “I was given this world, I didn’t make it.” Doing well on the SAT pays dividends and high school students may encounter this recruiter in the future, so I have decided to share my experience with the SAT. Five Years Ago… As many of my classmates prepared to gain admission to the University of Texas, I was... read more

You have one hour with a college prep specialist who can help make your admissions/scholarship essays award winning.  How can you maximize your time?  Here are five tips to get the most out of your time:   Come Prepared. - Bring the essay prompts from each of your colleges.  Bring a sample personal statement and resume.  Be sure to have any information necessary to complete an admissions essay, to include your GPA, test scores, and any major accomplishments. Know Thyself - Always know your stats.  During this time, knowing your GPA and SAT score is as important as knowing your name and birthdate.  Also, know (and have a list of) your interests, hobbies, favorite subjects, etc.  Have an idea of at least 3 possible majors and careers you would like to explore. Be on Time - There is a lot to cover!  The better prepared and earlier you are, the more likely we are to get a lot done. Also, I tend to take my time... read more

I remember taking some courses in my early years of undergrad that were pretty awful. The teaching wasn't that bad, and I was definitely awake for them (two key points to getting decent grades) but the subject matter just wasn't something I could ever see myself using. Sound familiar?    Interestingly though, after changing my attitude, I saw that I can indeed use most things learned in most classes, if I am looking for the beneficial parts of each subject. I'm not saying that if you hate science you'll want to start studying the makeup of dirt all of a sudden, but I can definitely assure you that there is a way to dislike things less.    So...how? We have to find ways to connect what math, science, English, or the like teaches us (even if it's under the surface) to what we love in life.    I love children with cancer. You can see more about that here. And even though I had to write that on the front of a lot of notebooks over... read more

The selection of college is a major decision. Families looking ahead to college selection have many questions: What are the expectations in college planning? What factors are important in identifying a college or university? How do you know if a college is right for you? With over 4,000 colleges and universities across the nation, it is often difficult to determine which schools are best suited for your child. Many focus on the ‘hype’  about the ever-changing admissions process, while others focus on the myths that have evolved out of the admissions process. College admissions process has become a ‘breeding ground’ for inaccurate statements and perceptions. Families do not have the time or resources to sort through the information and make well-informed decisions about college. With colleges and universities becoming more competitive and even more expensive, families are feeling an increased pressure and frustration to find the right college choice. Many are... read more

You’ve studied and you’ve prepared, but what comes next? Determining what colleges to apply to and attend is difficult as there are so many factors to consider. At Augmentus Tutoring, we aim to help you achieve your highest possible test scores that provide you with the ability to choose the school that is best for you. There are a multitude of considerations that contribute to this decision, including your goals and personality. We’ve narrowed it down to two top decision making factors: Size and Location. The benefits and considerations listed below are generalizations, so do not hesitate to reach out to a specific school to learn more about their programs. The size of the school affects the size of classrooms, size of athletic programs, and numerous other activities that will impact your overall experience. Attend a Big University Benefits that come with big colleges include a seemingly unlimited list of majors and minors, well-funded sports teams,... read more

Creating a legacy and leading by example may be concepts that some of us keep in the back of our minds, especially if we have children or grandchildren. Instinctively, we want their lives to be fuller, richer, maybe even easier. And trying to set a good example as parents is no easy feat — it can cause us to feel disappointment in ourselves if things don’t work out the way we planned. But there is at least one area where our hard work, even our setbacks and how we handle them can leave a lasting, positive effect on our peers and on younger generations —pursuing higher education. There are many benefits to being life-long learners, as successful people can attest. There are tangible rewards such as good salaries and benefits that help families stay healthy and happy. Adults who thrive can help create viable com-munities with options for the future and time for creativity and recreation. Important, too, are the less tangible rewards of interesting careers with... read more

This was another banner year for my client admits: Amherst, University of Alabama, Arcadia University, Art Institute of Chicago, Barnard, Coastal Carolina University, Columbia College Chicago, University of Delaware, Drexel University (multiple admissions), Fordham University, Guilford College (multiple admissions), Hofstra University, University of Illinois-Urbana-Champaign (multiple admissions), Ithaca College, Johnson & Wales University,LIM College, Loyola University Maryland, University of Maine, Marist College (prestigious freshman year in Florence program), University of Maryland-College Park (multiple admissions, including honors college), University of Baltimore County (all honors and Meyerhoff winner), University of Maine, University of Massachusetts-Amherst, University of Massachusetts-Boston, University of Massachusetts-Lowell, McDaniel College, Miami University -- Oxford, University of Miami (multiple admissions), University of Florida, New York University (multiple... read more

Test prep companies have been teaching students how to beat standardized tests such as the SAT and ACT for years. The simple truth is that these exams measure how well you take exams, not your aptitude or your ability to do college work. In some cases there may be a direct correspondence: students who have excellent grades have correspondingly excellent scores. And yet, there is a not-insignificant group of students with outstanding grades and poor scores. Does this mean standardized testing is unreliable? Or that it fails to consistently predict student success? Not exactly, and yes, respectively. Let’s back up for a moment and talk about the single best input for determining college success: the high school GPA. Time and time again a high correlation has been shown between success and engagement in academics in high school (as represented by an unweighted GPA) and performance in college. That’s because the GPA is a many-faceted guage. It samples various different types of... read more

You’ve studied and you’ve prepared, but what comes next? Determining what colleges to apply to and attend is difficult as there are so many factors to consider. At Augmentus Tutoring, we aim to help you achieve your highest possible test scores that provide you with the ability to choose the school that is best for you. There are a multitude of considerations that contribute to this decision, including your goals and personality. We’ve narrowed it down to two top decision making factors: Size and Location. The benefits and considerations listed below are generalizations, so do not hesitate to reach out to a specific school to learn more about their programs. The size of the school affects the size of classrooms, size of athletic programs, and numerous other activities that will impact your overall experience. Attend a Big University Benefits that come with big colleges include a seemingly unlimited list of majors and minors, well-funded sports teams,... read more

As I held the crisp white letter with the university’s insignia in my hand, I couldn’t believe my eyes. I read the letter once more to ensure that I understood the cold words. If you do not improve academically within the next semester, you will be expelled from this institution. I stood at the mailboxes in my residence hall… suddenly awaken (rudely I would argue) from my cozy assumption that, “I am smart and that’s all that matters”.   Back in 2001 I didn’t realize that peacefully drifting as I did in high school would not serve me well in college. No matter how smart I really am I would not have made it in college by simply paying attention and doing my homework. Study skills are imperative for maximizing success potential. This is no major secret but sadly studies of freshmen reveal that my experience was not isolated. Many students may suffer a blow to their self-confidence when they encounter the more rigorous academic work of higher education . Even more... read more

Greetings,   Students can benefit exponentially from a mentor.  A mentor is far more than a tutor.  A tutor will work through the coursework an try to make sure that the student grasps the material and is ready for upcoming quizzes and exam.  A mentor has real world experience and can lend guidance to the student as an individual who will ultimately need to go out into the world and make something of themselves.  The education or the diploma that he or she earns will not translate into a job or career automatically.  The hard work and real world experience that accompanies an education is where a mentor defines how they are much much more than a tutor.  I hope that every student has someone like this in their life.  For they will do their best to not let you stray from the proper path.   Joseph A., MD

See if there is one thing that I cannot stand, is seeing a student rush into a Stats class and stating that this class is remarkably easy because my friend said so. Too many times has a student come up to me and asked is statistics easy, and I reply "it most certainly is... for myself, because I studied my content for two years before retaking the course.". If you know that you are going to start a statistics class anywhere at any time your going to need the following items.   1. TI-83 or 84 preferably Now why one of these calculators? Students, if you are going to take a stats class be aware that there is a lot of data or numerical values that can be used to find the measures of central tendency and measures of dispersion. These calculators excel for data entry and double checking your answers on the very first test.    *If your teacher says you cannot use this calculator, then get its cheaper cousin. TI-30XII Hint there usually... read more

I’ve been thinking lately about why college application essays—any personal writing, really—triggers so much anxiety.  Andrew Ferguson gives us a marvelously personal perspective when he describes his experience as a father shepherding his 17-year-old son through writing the college essays during their last holiday break. He calls this process “the Great Extrusion,” where parents brace themselves “while dragging, pulling, tugging word after word and draft after draft from the insides of their mulish offspring until something presentable appeared.” Ferguson first gently, then more forcefully, offers stacks of books with sample essays to his son, as he does all he can to help without actually writing the essay for him.   By contrast, Robin Mamlet, a former Dean of admission, and Christine VanDeVelde, a journalist, offer a professional perspective. Their clear, step-by-step approach to the college essay advises 10 drafts written over the span of at least one month... read more

Isn't it interesting how some people know what they want to be when they grow up, while some of us can't decide which career to pursue? Don't despair! I was in this same situation many decades ago. While times can dictate what is acceptable or popular for a career, YOU must follow your heart. There are a few things you can do before deciding on a Major in College (or a Career): go to a College first, not a University. research a few interesting careers, ask friends and families what you would be good at doing, review your list of skills, get a part-time job, volunteer to learn a job skill, or audit a college course to see if it is your calling. You can do one or more of these suggestions, but whichever you decide, keep a journal of your notes. Write down your experiences and thoughts. After reviewing or experiencing 2 or 3 different career paths, review your notes and see how you feel. It may take a few tries and a few career paths before you find your... read more

Summer is an awesome time to be a student - free time and less stress can help you clear your thoughts and really establish your goals. Regardless of age or reason, there is no better time than summer to really hone your skills. If you'll be applying to college in the coming school year, now is the time to really set your goals in stone and get working on those applications. Personal statements take time to craft and make perfect, and if you haven't caught on by now, let me repeat it: there is no time like the present to get started. The earlier you begin planning, the more prepared you will be when the application deadlines start rolling in, and ultimately, that means you will be less stressed and more likely to succeed. Or, if you're just someone looking to get better at a particular skill, you can think of summer as an "off season," of sorts. You have a ton of skilled professionals at your disposal to help you sharpen your presenting skills or communication habits... read more

NEED-TO-KNOW Know How To Add an Email Signature in Microsoft Outlook   Once you’re in MS Outlook: 1. Click on the “File” menu in your top task menu. 2. Click on “Options”. 3. In the dialog box, click on “Mail”. 4. Find and open “Signatures” on the right side of the page. 5. Create your signature by choosing “New” and type a name for it in the text field. * Now you’ll create the signature you want displayed at the bottom of your emails. You can personalize fonts, insert images and provide hyperlinks (company logos, website URLs, etc.)   Items You May Want to Consider Including: - Name - Job Title, Department - Office Phone, Fax Number - Company Name, Location - Logo or Website Link for the Company   Once you've finished & saved your signature, you can select which emails you'd like it to be automatically added to. It can be set to populate on every email sent from your Outlook account or you... read more

Unless you or your child attends a year – round school, summer vacation begins sometime in the next week or so. College students have read more pages than they thought humanly possible, taken many exams, written research papers, and stayed up way too late over the past 10 months. Parents of school – aged children have helped with homework, gone to parent/ teacher conferences, E-mailed teachers, and maybe volunteered for one activity too many. This article will help you understand the importance of continuing your/ your child’s learning over the summer and lists several suggestions on how to make the fall back - to - school transition much easier! Suffer No Setbacks Educational researchers agree that students need to continue their education over the summer or they stand to lose up to three (3) months worth of the previous year’s learning. Think about that for a minute. It’s like going to class from March to May for no reason! Unless you keep learning over the summer, you’ll... read more

Please let me know your experience, or any helpful information you may have regarding Parental Alienation in divorce (or post-divorce) cases. I am deeply concerned for the well-being of some children who may be victims of Parental Alienation. I have been told that this is a form of child abuse, since it can seriously impact a child's self-esteem. Research shows that children in divorce cases are under stress, and when one parent "vilifies" the other parent, it can cause emotional damage to the child, or children. If you can take a minute to comment or email me directly, I would greatly appreciate your assistance. Thanks in advance--I hope to hear from you soon.

College - bound high school seniors are facing a deadline they may not know about: the FAFSA application. It’s easy to understand how students can overlook it with all their high school work and graduation requirements on their minds. But, failing to turn the form in can make them ineligible for college financial aid next year. This article will teach high school seniors basic facts and tips to make filling out their FAFSA easy! 1. What Does the FAFSA Determine? The FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid) determines you/ your “Expected Family Contribution” (EFC) to your college education. In other words, how much college tuition and room and board fees you/ your family can afford to pay and still maintain their current standard of living. In some cases, the Student Aid Report (or “SAR”) you receive will state that you/ your family’s EFC is $0. This simply means you will probably be eligible for more financial aid. It does not mean that you are eligible for “$0 financial... read more

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